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Sunday, August 4
 

3:00pm

 
Monday, August 5
 

8:00am

8:30am

Open Jam Huddle

Not finding the session you were looking for? Want to delve deeper into a session you went to? Have an edgy or groundbreaking topic to share? Got some questions you want to discuss?

 

Then you want to come to Open Jam, where folks gather to introduce thoughts and take away ideas while building off of one another's creativity.

 

Anyone may convene an Open Jam session. They are short sessions that run throughout the day, from early in the morning, like Lean Coffee, and sometimes late into the evening! All you need to lead a session is passion and commitment.

 

We encourage interactive sessions providing opportunities to explore ideas and techniques. Sessions don't need to be formal, in fact, it's more fun if they are not!

 

So come to the Open Jam daily huddle at 8:30AM in the Jack Daniels space to choose a time slot for your session, then announce it to fellow conference participants so they can join! Feel free to tweet or promote your session using the conference hashtag #agile2013.

 

Follow @Open_Jam on Twitter for updates to what’s happening at the Open Jam track. Explore more, join Open Jam!


Monday August 5, 2013 8:30am - 9:00am
Open Jam - Jack Daniels

9:00am

Coding for America: How Agile and Lean are disrupting government -- and why they need to. (Abhi Nemani)
Limited Capacity seats available

Governments spend hundreds of billions of dollars on technology, but they can adopt modern practices to reduce costs and improve services. And here's the thing: they are.


Speakers
avatar for Abhi Nemani

Abhi Nemani

Chief of Staff, Code for America
Abhi Nemani has worked closely with technology firms, political organizations, and local governments, focusing on leveraging technology to grow their impact. At the Rose Institute of State and Local Government, he led a 30-person research team to increase transparency and efficiency in governance using technology, and at various political organizations, including the Center for American Progress and Young Democrats of America, he has... Read More →


Monday August 5, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Delta B, C, D

10:45am

History & Overview of Agile Development (Ahmed Sidky)
Limited Capacity seats available

In this session we will explore why Agile is a Mindset, not a process or a methodology. We will walk through the history of Agile starting from its roots in Lean, to the emergence of the popular agile methodologies like Scrum and XP through the writing of the Agile Manifesto and the evolution of Agile as we now understand it today. This will provide the critical context needed for the remaining sessions in the Boot Camp, show you the 'why' behind things before you dive into the 'how'.

Speakers

Monday August 5, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Delta B

10:45am

Harnessing the Creativity of Your Technical Team. (Cindy Gallop, Corey Innis)
Limited Capacity filling up

This is our story of how we built two successful lean startups,  http://ifwerantheworld.com/ and  https://makelovenotporn.tv/, from the ground up. We will be talking about our process,  Cindy’s experience of working closely with our technical team & Pivotal Labs to realize her vision, and  Corey’s experience as CTO and leader of the tech team of translating that vision into reality.

Cindy  will illustrate the realities of managing a lean startup technical team from a CEO’s perspective. Corey will illustrate the realities of both managing a lean startup technical team, and also managing the CEO. :)

Many CEOs have an opaque window into their technical team. This vantage point can have counterproductive results born from good intentions.   We are going to be utterly frank and honest about the trials, the tribulations, the blood, sweat and tears of how two very different mindsets and perspectives can meet, merge and get to awesome.

We will be sharing the solutions that we found for:

* Overcoming the obstacles we faced as lean startup.
* The tooling, data & process CEOs need to gauge the ramifications of their decisions on the development team.
* How to have the right amount of friction (push and pull) to get a polished product
* Which of the weird Agile practices is making your team crazy good or just plain crazy.
* How to write user stories and break them into minimum marketable features.
* How to create a closely collaborative triumvirate between technical, marketing, user experience to maximize the value of each mindset. 

We will also be sharing how all of these things become even more challenging when you are working on a startup that is considered ‘adult content’, as per https://makelovenotporn.tv/.



Speakers
avatar for Cindy Gallop

Cindy Gallop

Founder & CEO, IfWeRanTheWorld/MakeLoveNotPorn
I like to blow shit up. I am the Michael Bay of business.
avatar for Corey Innis

Corey Innis

CTO, IfWeRanTheWorld/MakeLoveNotPorn
the only thing that's capital-T True is that you get to decide how you're going to try to see it. you get to consciously decide what has meaning and what doesn't. you get to decide what to worship.


Monday August 5, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Canal E

10:45am

What is Devops? (John Willis)
Limited Capacity seats available

This is the second most asked question today in IT. Obviously behind “What is a Cloud?”. Most people who have been following the Devops movement for the past three years would agree it really doesn’t or maybe shouldn’t even have a definition. For example “What is Agile?” doesn’t really have a simple answer. A general consensus of like minded Devops followers might agree with Adam Jacob’s, (founder of Opscode), definition of “It’s a cultural and professional movement”. That’s it. However, in this session we are going to try and expand on the ideas behind the Devops movement. We will attempt to discuss the “Why” of Devops. Why does it exist, what is it’s history, what are some of it’s patterns and also look at some practitioning examples. We will start by looking at some of the roots of the movement breaking down it’s history. We will take a deeper look at the following influences:

* Lean Manufacturing
* Lean Startup
* Agile and Agile Infrastructure
* Continuous Delivery
* Web Scale

We will look at some of the direct and indirect influences of twentieth century management scientist like Deming, Goldratt and Ohno. We will also will look at taxonomy that has been used to try and identify certain patterns of Devops called CAMS.

* Culture
* Automation
* Measurement
* Sharing

And finally we will end up with a look at some successful Devops style companies who have been capturing the mindshare of this movement. Companies like:

* Etsy
* Github
* Netflix

Estimated Timeline:

History and Influences (15 Minutes)
Taxonomy Overview (15 Minutes)
Case Studies (30 Minutes)
Q & A (15 MInutes)

The audience for this presentation is for anyone who wants to ask or has already asked the question “What is Devops?”.

Speakers
avatar for John Willis

John Willis

VP of Services and Enablement at Enstratus | John Willis has worked in the IT management industry for more than 30 years. Prior to joining enStratus, Willis was the VP of Solutions for DTO Solutions where he led the transition to a new suite of automated infrastructure and DevOps solutions. Prior to DTO Solutions. Willis was the VP of Training & Services at Opscode where he formalized the training, evangelism, and professional services... Read More →


Monday August 5, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Governors C

10:45am

Scaling the ScrumMaster (Evan Wiley, Keith Nottonson)
Limited Capacity full

Scaling the Product Owner seems straightforward enough, but how do we accomplish the same goal with the ScrumMaster role? Is it done in a similar vein to the PO, with Uber-ScrumMasters and Scaled ScrumMasters? Is it accomplished differently via Coaches and Agile Anarchists? Is positional authority necessary, as found with Tech Leads & Group Pod Leaders? And how do enthusiasts and communities of practice support scaling the ScrumMaster?

Together we will explore the role of the ScrumMaster within a large agile organization by discussing the merits of the ScrumMaster role, identifying what problems scaling the ScrumMaster solves and then sharing real-life examples and lessons we’ve learned at enterprise agile implementations through our coaching experience at Salesforce, Yahoo! and Johnson & Johnson.


Speakers
avatar for Keith Nottonson

Keith Nottonson

Development Director, Optimizely
avatar for Evan Willey

Evan Willey

UberScrumMaster, Work.com / Salesforce.com


Monday August 5, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Bayou C

10:45am

Transforming a Public Sector Company - From Stone Age to Agile (Ardita Karaj, Jason Little)
Limited Capacity seats available

Transforming to Agile practices is difficult, perhaps even more so for public sector government organizations. In this session we'll give an experience report for how we brought these practices into a public sector organization with a 280 person IT department (4300 organization wide) and how we're branching out into other public sector organizations as a result. While the initial scope of the internal coaching team was the IT group, we'll show you how we were able to spread influence to other areas of the organization including the PMO, HR, Learning and Performance (L&P) and Change Management departments despite the additional constraints that come along with working in a government organization.

In a year we've been able to migrate the entire 280 person IT group to Agile, added Agile training curriculum to the official leadership program through HR, helped transform the PMO, and develop technical capability to better support delivery of software. We'll show you the progress we've made and the process we used to get there.

Some of the topics we will touch:

* Transformation using Lean Startup – created a home-grown change management method called Lean Change (http://www.leanchange.org)
* Contractors and Internal coaches – The difference in approach and results
* Culture Hacking - How small hacks that run against the 'cultural norms' yielded high gains
* How to change areas where you lack control by establishing relationships
* How we used classic change management tools like ADKAR
* How to manage the managers during a Transformation – including our own
* Our’s bigger! (the Kanban Board off course) - lots of pictures (of boards, change canvases, metrics, games, etc) ,
* What keeps on giving – some areas where a little change goes a long way,
* How a team of coaches can work - and be aligned
* How we branched out of IT and into HR, Learning/Performance groups and got Management 3.0 on the official leadership curriculum
* How we used Innovation Games to help people confused with their

Speakers
avatar for Ardita Karaj

Ardita Karaj

Agile Coach, EPAM Canada
Ardita is a passionate Agile coach, trainer, change agent and consultant in the Toronto area. She brings more than 15 years of software development experience from different commercial and public organizations. Over the past few years her focus has been on process improvement for organizations that are adopting Agile frameworks like Scrum and Kanban. Working with both management and development teams, she is well known for applying Agile and Lean... Read More →
avatar for Jason Little

Jason Little

Agile and Organizational Change Coach, Leanintuit
Jason began his career as a web developer when Cold Fusion roamed the earth. Over the following years, he moved into management, Agile Coaching and consulting. The bumps and bruises collected along the way brought him to the realization that helping organizations adopt Agile practices was less about the practices, and all about change. In 2008 he attended an experiential learning conference about how people experience change and since then... Read More →


Monday August 5, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Bayou D

10:45am

Creating and Sustaining High-Performance Teams through Team Cultural Understanding (Peter Saddington)
Limited Capacity full

There has been a ton written about management techniques for creating great teams. Let’s go a bit further, and look into how managers can build great teams not by using a new method or management style, but rather understanding team dynamics and behavioral science and patterns.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Saddington - MDiv, CST

Peter Saddington - MDiv, CST

Maharaja of Agile, Action & Influence, Inc.
PETER SADDINGTON owns a successful research and analytics consultancy and has been integral in multi-million dollar Agile Transformation projects with some of the biggest Fortune 500 companies, including Cisco, T-Mobile, Capital One, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Aetna, Primedia, and Cbeyond. He is a sought-after speaker at many industry events and is a Certified Scrum Trainer (CST). He has also received three master's degrees, one of which is in... Read More →


Monday August 5, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Canal B

10:45am

Real Options with Trust (Olaf Lewitz, Steve Holyer)
Limited Capacity seats available

[Real Options](http://leanprocrastination.com/blog/2012/08/real-options-a-mindset/) have been present in the agile and lean community for half a decade, helping methods like Feature Injection and Impact Mapping to evolve and improving decision making in general. We think it's time to give it a twist:

Moving further away from the maths/finance origin and adding trust to the concept we can focus on what Real Options can help us achieve: a raised state of awareness of our present's potential. This is a virtuous learning loop: learning more about our options leads to greater awareness, helping us to identify more options we can again learn more about...

Dave Snowden coined the phrase explore the potential of the present as guidance on how to deliberately experiment in a complex environment. Awareness of our options increases the discovery of things to try.

Our lack of trust and common wish for certainty in our lives leads to coercion: expectations, obligations, all these coulda-shoulda-woulda thoughts let us treat options as commitments. Trusting ourselves and others can lead to a state of deliberate serendipity: we grant ourselves the freedom to be pleasantly surprised. These surprises allow the deep learning we need to delight our clients in an agile team.

You will learn how to establish trust, how to increase the number of choices, and to embrace uncertainty and ambiguity to confidently make better decisions.

We will capture experiences and stories shared in this session in some way (maybe through phone recordings of conversations) so that we can afterwards share examples of the serendipitous effects of trusts with the greater community.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Holyer

Steve Holyer

Principle Consultant (and Indie-label Coach), Engage-Results.com
Steve Holyer is an experienced trainer, coach, facilitator and consultant helping organisations unleash value and produce results. He is also a frequent international speaker on Scrum and Agile software development. He serves as advocate and mentor for companies, leaders and change agents looking for a better way of working using Agile practices in a productive, fulfilling, and fun way. | | From international Swiss business to emerging... Read More →
avatar for Olaf Lewitz

Olaf Lewitz

Trust Artist, trustartist.com
Witch, Nomad, Pioneer.Trust Artist. Connecting with people to enable them to increase trust, in themselves and others.Will stay when needed and leave when wanted.Loving and challenging.Using Scrum, Kanban, CoreProtocols, NVC, agile or better.


Monday August 5, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Bayou A

10:45am

The Agile Mindset - what's next? (Linda Rising)
Limited Capacity seats available

At Agile 2011 I gave a talk about the Agile Mindset. That talk was surprisingly very well received and I have given it many times since. I have continued to keep up with the research on mindset and have incorporated that new research into the evolving presentation. Some years ago I gave another talk at Agile on Who do you trust, which has also proved a popular topic. Now I'm learning that the two talks are related, so I have combined them. To summarize the Agile Mindset Talk: Researchers have identified that we hold one of two mindsets toward ability: (1) that we have a fixed amount of talent or intelligence, what we are born with and there’s nothing we can do about it; (2) that we are born with a certain amount of talent or intelligence, but we can all improve by working hard. These two mindsets: “fixed” and “agile” not only determine how we feel about our own success or failure but also how we feel about others. To summarize the Who do you trust Talk: Researchers tell us that we are hardwired to stereotype others based on a very small amount of information. Now they say there is a connection between our mindset and how quickly we judge others and how open we are to seeing how others can improve. If we can do a better job of holding an agile mindset, imagine how much more creative, innovative, and cooperative our workplaces and homes could be. Having an agile mindset means more openness means better collaboration means better agile team work. There is now research that shows mindset can even affect our ability to bring peace in areas of long-standing conflict. It's a very hopeful topic.

Speakers
LR

Linda Rising

Linda Rising LLC


Monday August 5, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Delta D

10:45am

Rapid Product Design In The Wild (Michele Ide-Smith)
Limited Capacity seats available

How do you know you're developing the right product? This talk will help you think creatively about how to do customer development using Agile and Lean User Experience methods. I'll share what we learnt about using rapid, iterative prototyping techniques to develop a minimum viable product at a software conference.

In August 2012 we attended Kscope, a conference for Oracle developers. Instead of doing the usual product demonstrations, we turned our stand into a live lab and took Agile development processes out of the office and in front of our customers. Our stand included an area for customer research, a Kanban board and information radiators in the form of a whiteboard, blank wall and a large digital screen. Over 3 days we ran 9 sprints and conducted 25 customer interviews, using a paper prototype to get feedback. We collected invaluable information about our customers' development environments, how they work with their teams, their processes, tasks and pain points. By the end of the conference my colleague had developed an interactive HTML/CSS prototype which potential customers could evaluate. The team went through several rapid build-measure-learn cycles to improve our product concept and validate the market need.

I’ll cover the benefits and pitfalls of doing live design and development in front of potential customers and competitors. For example:

• doing guerilla research with no up-front participant recruitment;

• analysing and making sense of large amounts of research data on the fly;

• making your design and development process transparent;

• recording and communicating research insights for future reference and remote team members.

The talk will illustrate how opening up our development process at a trade show provided visitors to the stand with an opportunity to experience Agile and Lean methods first-hand, and that marketing teams can learn a lot from Agile development teams.

Anyone directly involved in product design, development and marketing would get value from attendi

Speakers
avatar for Michele Ide-Smith

Michele Ide-Smith

User Experience Specialist, Red Gate Software
I've worked in web and software development since 1997, starting as a web developer and gaining experience in project management, information architecture, web channel management and user experience. | | As a User Experience Specialist at Red Gate I design tools which take the pain out of delivering software. I enjoy developing and contributing to local UX communities and co-organise the Cambridge Usability Group events. I'm a keen... Read More →


Monday August 5, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Canal A

10:45am

Estimating Business Value (Chris Sims)
Limited Capacity full

Forget about comparing apples and oranges. How about dollars and cents? My user story has more business value than yours does. Or does it? One of the most exciting aspects of agile development is the emphasis on creating and delivering products based on prioritized business value. But at some point early in the process -- someone has to figure out that value. And that someone might be you.

This workshop explores the art and science of business value. What is business value? Is it more than a singular dollar value randomly generated by a product manager? What methods could be used to produce numeric business value relevant to user stories in an agile development environment? How can well-defined business values help focus and accelerate teams to make better decisions and deliver better products? Come to this workshop and discover the two surprisingly simple techniques to estimate and quantify business value.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Sims

Chris Sims

Agile Coach and Certified Scrum Trainer, Agile Learning Labs
Chris Sims is a Certified Scrum Trainer, agile coach, and recovering C++ developer who helps software development teams improve their productivity and happiness. Chris is the founder of Agile Learning Labs and co-author of two best-selling scrum books: The Elements of Scrum and Scrum: a Breathtakingly Brief and Agile Introduction.


Monday August 5, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Governors A

10:45am

Think Outside the Timebox - Transitioning from Timeboxes to Continuous Product Delivery (Steve Stolt, Steven Younge)
Limited Capacity seats available

Agile continuous flow (Kanban) methods aren’t only for Operations and Support anymore -- Product Development teams now use them for strategic, date-sensitive initiatives to achieve faster time to market. Proceed with caution! Simply throwing away timeboxes can be dangerous.

We took the journey from a timeboxed to a continuous flow software delivery model. We brought along a large tribe of developers, testers, product owners, dev-ops people, UX designers, and stakeholders. We got lost a few times on the way, but we did find our destination.

Spend 75 minutes with us and learn about the paths you should avoid, and those you should run toward, if you're considering a similar journey.

Speakers
SS

Steve Stolt

I work at Rally Software as a product line manager for Rally ALM. I'm passionate about my family, friends and work. Conversations about Agile, Rally's products, or product management in general are always welcome. Reach out if you'd like to connect. Cheers.
SY

Steven Younge

Product Owner, Rally
Stephen is a Product Line Director at Rally Software. He has 2 decades of experience in the software industry, and has been practicing Agile for the past 6 years.


Monday August 5, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Canal C/D

10:45am

User Story Mapping in Practice (Steve Rogalsky)
Limited Capacity full

Creating a backlog of user stories is pretty straight forward but it doesn't help you when it comes to decisions like what to build first, how to prioritize and groom the backlog, how to scope and plan the project, and how to visualize progress. The traditional backlog is simply too flat and often too long to help you see the bigger picture and make good decisions. User Story Mapping helps simplify all of these common project issues. By adding a third dimension to your backlog, your team will make better decisions about priorities, scope, and planning while improving your ability to visualize progress.

In this practical session I’ll cover the basics of user story mapping before walking you through case studies of how our teams are using this approach and the results we are achieving. I'll show you the before, during, and after pictures from several projects so that you can understand how our maps progress during the projects and how we use them to influence iterative development, promote good decision making, and visualize priorities, plans, scope and progress.

Speakers

Monday August 5, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Bayou B

10:45am

After Twelve Years of Agile-Testing: How Did We Get Here and What Do We Know? (Matthew Heusser)
Limited Capacity seats available

Twelve years after the Agile Manifesto was founded, we know a lot about how software is developed. Testing, on the other hand, is a little bit more ... fuzzy. Yes, we have advice on process and some shared language around testing, but how to fit the customer-facing into a sprint remains a challenge for many teams.

In this presentation Matthew Heusser covers the Agile Software Test Literature, discussion what's been proposed, what's been tried ... and how that played out four or five years later. Drawing examples from his own work on real software projects, colleagues, and the literature, Matt will explain some common approaches to customer-facing tests, including scripted testing, exploratory testing, performance, automated linear testing, and high-volume test automation methods.

In addition to how to test, Matt will talk about the why of testing - how Agile principles subtly shift the way we think about the work, to eliminate entire categories of risk, while making a few risk categories more important.

Instead of a simple, easy prescription (automate everything), Matt will cover several different approaches, their strengths and weaknesses, and why you may want to consider each one.

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Heusser

Matthew Heusser

Principal Consultant, Excelon Development
Matt has deep experience in software testing, project management, development, writing, and systems improvement. His extensive network of contacts in these fields has enabled him to put together a diversified, high-level team of experts at Excelon. | | In 2006, Matt was lead organizer for the initial Great Lakes Software Excellence Conference, a regional event that continues today. He organized the Agile-Alliance Sponsored Workshop on the... Read More →


Monday August 5, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Governors D

10:45am

Customer Who?? (Maria Matarelli, Daniel Sack)
Limited Capacity seats available

Do your teams have a real connection to their customers? Join us as we explore how to best engage customers with Agile teams that may have multiple customers and end users. Hear a story of what happened when we built a product without including our customers and learn pitfalls to avoid. We’ll discuss how to handle it when your development teams receive customer feedback that changes their course and examine the layers between our teams and the end user. Discover techniques for getting full circle feedback from the customers to the development team and ensure that you’re delivering what your customers value.


Monday August 5, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Governors E

10:45am

Net Promoter System for Agile Companies (Bernd Schiffer)
Limited Capacity seats available

Customer collaboration is essential to every Agile business. To create and collaborate to keep a customer is the purpose of an organisation. But still lots of companies try to make bad profits, i.e. profits earned at the expense of customer relationships. The Net Promoter System (NPS) is a renowned open-source system which addresses and measures customer collaboration. And did you know that you not only can use it to get feedback on your products and services, but also on your employees and your personal performance?

NPS is a perfect fit for Agile companies - and those who want to be. Most of the companies I worked with (Agile coaching, training, consulting) had not heard about it, and far less were actually using it. This really surprises me, since NPS integrates like a charm with Agile, e.g. within product development via Scrum.

In this session I’ll explain the basics of NPS, i.e. promoters and detractors, satisfied and delighted customers, bad profits (how to deal with bad feedback?) and good profits, and why and how to measure these. Several stories from companies like Apple Retail, Zappos, Southwest Airlines, and others will help to make my point. I’ll further show why NPS is a very good fit with Agile regarding products, employees, and personal performance. Dos and Don’ts regarding NPS (also from personal experience) will close this session. Related to the Don'ts, I also cover some of the negative critiques out there.

Speakers
avatar for Bernd Schiffer

Bernd Schiffer

Agile Coach, Trainer, and Consultant, Bold Mover
Bernd Schiffer is Agile coach, trainer and consultant in Melbourne, Australia. He founded his own Agile company called Bold Mover, and he's been doing Agile and Lean for about 12 years. He often works at the client's introducing Scrum and Kanban at team and management level. He deeply cares about his work, and he's passionate about running long distances.


Monday August 5, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Bayou E

1:00pm

2:00pm

Agile Planning & Project Management (Mike Cohn)
Limited Capacity seats available

In this session we will shatter the myth that agile teams can't plan. We'll start by looking at the benefits of the short cycles of iterative and incremental development. We'll then look at the six different levels of planning that occur in agile organizations. We'll see what user stories are and why they've become the preferred approach to planning and managing the work of an agile team. We'll look at how user stories are estimated with the popular Planning Poker technique. To do that we'll discuss the merits of relative estimating and abstract approaches such as story points and what a point really means. With an initial plan created, we'll look at how agile teams use the concept of velocity to measure and predict progress. We'll also look at information radiatiors such as task boards and burndown charts. We'll conclude by looking at how these concepts can be applied to complex situations such as fixed-date and fixed-scope projects.

Speakers
avatar for Mike  Cohn

Mike Cohn

President, Mountain Goat Software
I am the author of three books on agile software development: User Stories Applied; Agile Estimating and Planning; and Succeeding with Agile. I am interested in the management and leadership practices necessary to enable agility.


Monday August 5, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Delta B

2:00pm

My Agile Suitcase - Travel light with Pecha Kucha of experienced Agilists (Martin Heider)
Limited Capacity seats available

 

 Imagine you are an Agile consultant or coach. You are called by the inhabitants from waterfall island, who haven’t heard about Agility before and want to benefit from your advice. Which practices, principles and values would you pack in your agile suitcase for providing them guidance? What would you leave at home? In this session following experienced Agilists will deliver insights in their Agile suitcases: 

  • David Hussman
  • Johanna Rothman 
  • Michael Sahota
  • Arlo Belshee 
  • Bernd Schiffer 

Their short, concise and entertaining Pecha Kuchas may give you hints for your own suitcase. Afterwards you will work on your own agile suitcases. This may help you to travel lighter next time. 



Speakers
avatar for Martin Heider

Martin Heider

Owner, infomar software
With 20 years of professional IT background I’m coaching projects, teams and companies to improve their way of working since eight years. I create waves to push my clients and colleagues out of their box in order to help them to get better. Doing this I try to keep the balance between avoiding to overwhelm and striving for excellence. Besides working as coach, consultant and trainer I’m organizing Agile Tracks on conferences, I’m one of the... Read More →


Monday August 5, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Bayou A

2:00pm

Mob Programming - A Whole Team Approach (Woody Zuill)
Limited Capacity seats available

Mob Programming is a development practice where the whole team works on the same thing, at the same time, in the same space, and at the same computer. This is a Whole Team approach to doing all the work the team does - including coding, designing, testing, and working with the cusotmer (partner, Product Owner, user, etc). We have expanded the team nature of all the work we do - not just planning, retrospectives, and a daily standup or other meeting - but all the work that the team does. This could be thought of as Pair Programming++, or continuous collaboration, perhaps.

In other words, this is an evolutionary step to the pair programming, face-to-face communication, team alignment, collaboration, and self organizing team concepts of the Agile approach to software development.

I'll share how we've been using this practice to super-charge our development efforts and deliver high value software for almost 2 years. We'll see what it looks like, the benefits, and how to do it yourself. In our workplace we Mob Programm all day, every day, but we'll also explore some ideas on how you can employ all of the concepts and practices (and get the benefits) of Mob Programming in your own company even if you can't do it all day, every day.

### What it looks like:

* I have photos, a short time-lapse video of a full day, and a few drawings that make it easy to see the basic approach and how we have arranged things

### We'll see some of the benefits ###

* More productive coding
* Incidents are known to everyone immediately and solved quickly before moving to production
* Nearly 100% bug free code in production
* Teams overall productivity increased by an order of magnitude
* Blocking issues become visible immediately, and are dealt with immediately - no hiding
* Easy to gather for meetings since our meeting space is our mobbing space
* No Need for Daily Stand-ups – we are always in alignment
* Less repetitive stress and other health issues (and we use a lot of hand sanitizer)
* Wea

Speakers
avatar for Woody Zuill

Woody Zuill

Application Development Manager, Hunter Industries
I've been a software developer for 30+ years, and I'm an Agile enthusiast. I work as an Agile Coach with the original "Mob Programming" team, and have been instrumental highlighting "No Estimates" concepts. | | I've enjoy sharing my Agile experiences, and learning new things. If you are ever in the San Diego area please stop by and "Mob" with us. | | I maintain and write for both the http://mobprogramming.org website, and my own blog at... Read More →


Monday August 5, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Canal A

2:00pm

Understanding Leadership in Self-Organizing Teams (Don Gray)
Limited Capacity full

What does leader mean in self-organizing teams? Is there one leader or many? What factors enable or squelch leading? How does leading in self-organizing teams compare to more traditional roles?

*Understanding leadership in teams:* Team members lead by enabling others to solve problems. Without title or position team members motivate others, organize and reorganize themselves to solve their current problem, and innovate by sharing information and ideas. This leads to dynamic and emergent leaders.

Using the Motivation, Organization, and Innovation (MOI) leadership model, participants learn how to foster leadership in their agile teams, and how to encourage motivation, organization, and innovation. We’ll share examples of successes, and tools and frameworks to understand how the team is doing.

Speakers
DG

Don Gray

President, n-th Order Systems, Inc
Having worked in software for 30 years I focus my energy and efforts working with executives to create the conditions where teams can flourish developing business value. I facilitate team learning and interdependent work. This includes assessments, embedded coaching, focused coaching, public and private workshops. | | I lead sessions at Agile meetups across the southeast, from Richmond, VA to Knoxville, TN to Charleston, SC. Topics range... Read More →


Monday August 5, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Bayou B

2:00pm

Self-Service Build and Deployment at Netflix (Gareth Bowles)
Limited Capacity seats available

Netflix customers stream their movies and TV shows via a Service Oriented Architecture made up of hundreds of fine grained services. The teams who own each service are responsible for maintaining their services and deploying them to our production AWS cloud, and they are free to set their own deployment schedules.

This talk will explore the self-service (and largely open source) toolchain that we built to let our engineering teams build, release, test and deploy their services, all without the aid of dedicated release engineers. I'll start off with the motivation behind the decision to go self-service and explore how we designed and built the toolchain. I'm not planning to give a lot of time to any individual tool, but rather focus on the problems we faced and when they led us to build our own versus using something off the shelf. Finally, I'll take a peek at some significant improvements that we're making for the future.

Speakers
avatar for Gareth Bowles

Gareth Bowles

Sr. Tools Engineer, Netflix


Monday August 5, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Delta D

2:00pm

Why We Need Architects (and Architecture) on Large Scale Agile Projects (Rebecca Wirfs-Brock)
Limited Capacity seats available

The typical rhythm of agile software development is to work on the next known, small batch of work. Some propose that software architecture should emerge and shouldn't require any extra attention. But it isn’t always prudent to let your architecture emerge at the speed of the next iteration, especially when you are building large, complex software systems. Complex enterprise systems and large software projects have many moving parts, dependencies, challenges, and unknowns. Without appropriate architectural investigations and ongoing attention, such projects can be risky. Yet two commonly heard phrases in agile development are, “Let your architecture emerge” and, “Always implement what you actually need, never what you think you might need.”

This talk will explore how you can be agile at managing architecture risks and innnovations for complex projects and programs.We'll present options for effectively developing and refining your architecture and monitoring its ongoing health. We'll introduce the notion of architecture spikes and explain how they differ from design spikes. We'll discuss how small team design practices contribute to sustainable architecture, and introduce other practices you might want to employ to mitigate architecture risk and incrementally develop and evolve your architecture. We'll conclude with a call for action to agile architects and their role in enabling sustainable software development.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

President, Wirfs-Brock Associates
I'm best known as the "design geek" who invented Responsibility-Driven Design and the xDriven meme. I'm also keen about team effectiveness, communicating complex requirements, software quality, pragmatic TDD, and techniques for architecting and reducing risk on agile projects and programs. I'm a slow jogger... if anyone is interested in early morning runs while at Agile 2014 it'd be fun to meet and go on a run.


Monday August 5, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Governors C

2:00pm

Lean Product Ownership for Fat Organizations (Joanna Snead)
Limited Capacity filling up

The Agile/Lean community is on fire for Lean Start Up techniques, but can we apply the same techniques in big government or larger companies? In this session we will demonstrate how these techniques work in fat organizations in order to avoid the classic pitfalls of struggling with product approvals, willingness to change, and achieving a product's Big Vision. You will leave with practical techniques that you can apply to trim the fat once you return back to work.

Speakers
avatar for Joanna Snead

Joanna Snead

Senior Consultant, Excella Consulting
Product Management consultant passionate for building products that enhance revenue and surprise and delight customers. Love to apply Lean Start Up thinking to products and companies of all shapes and sizes.


Monday August 5, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Canal E

2:00pm

Adapting Agile Methodology to Overcome Social Differences in Project Members (Hitoshi Ozawa, Lan ZHANG)
Limited Capacity seats available

Projects often consist with members with different values that may cause conflicts within the team causing decrease in members' motivation, involvement, and cohesiveness. In our experiences with offshoring Japanese software development projects to China, we were having difficulties with low quality deliverables and high turnover rate of Chinese members because of social differences. Our attempts to create a common culture were not very successful because people in general are less likely to change their basic views and behavior in a short period of time. We, however, were able to obtain success by acknowledging that differences are going to exist and adopting and adapting agile practices in consideration of the existence of these differences.

This session will show Kaizen as is used by a Japanese company in software development. We will focus on our experiences with social differences we've found and how we continuously adapted practices in our project to take better advantage of the situation as relationship between members changed. It is based on our over 10 years of experience in trying to improve a software package development at a software company in China, which has now become our subsidiary. During our attempts, we have learned the importance of agile mentality in resolving social difference issues. We believe what we've learned in adapting agile practices is not just limited to our particular project but can be useful in agile projects in general and thus can be used to assist resolve value differences in organizations as well.

Speakers
avatar for Hitoshi Ozawa

Hitoshi Ozawa

Consultant, OGIS-RI
Senior consultant involved with several open source projects in spare time. Like jogging and cycling.
LZ

Lan ZHANG

OGIS-RI


Monday August 5, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Governors E

2:00pm

Conflict Facilitation as a Leadership Skill: A Systems Approach for Leaders & Coaches (Michael Spayd, Lyssa Adkins)
Limited Capacity full

Whether hot and messy or cold and hidden, conflict surrounds us as leaders. There are two common choices: become the arbitrator who breaks the tie, or throw up our hands in exasperation, deciding it’s the (self-organized) team’s problem. A third, more powerful approach is to become a skilled conflict facilitator. This hands-on workshop provides four interrelated systems intelligence tools and mindsets to help you prevent destructive conflict and encourage the creative kind: positive/negative ratio, deep democracy, the Conflict Dynamics model, and conflict protocols.

The relationship systems approach, from CRRGlobal, will be discussed and facilitated by two experienced agile + relationship systems coaches in this session. First laying a foundation with the team’s positive/negative behavioral ratio, to create a positive emotional bank account that helps people “assume positive intent” and strengthen resiliency. We then add an attitude for the leader called Deep Democracy, a systems approach to hearing all voices in a system. The heart of the approach is familiarity with the common constructive and destructive behaviors exhibited by people in conflict from the Conflict Dynamics model, a framework to think about how we get into conflict as a team. Do we take each other's perspective? Or, do we try to win the argument at all costs? There are a total 15 such behaviors, based on research into how people and teams really get into conflict. If I know these, I can talk to my team about them, have a discussion of what our favorite behaviors, then agree to work on eliminating or minimizing the destructive ones, whether passive or active. Finally, we add a behavioral structure -- Conflict Protocols -- to prepare teams for the heat of conflict. You will get practice with the Conflict Dynamics model and with Conflict Protocols in this session.

Speakers
avatar for Lyssa Adkins

Lyssa Adkins

Coach of Agile Coaches, Agile Coaching Institute
I came to Agile as a project leader with over 15 years project management expertise. Even with all that experience, nothing prepared me for the power and simplicity of Agile done well.My Agile experience, along with my professional coaching and training abilities, gives me the perspective needed to guide teams and Agile leaders to harness Agile as the competitive advantage weapon it was meant to be. I know the transformation path is rocky. As a... Read More →
avatar for Michael Spayd

Michael Spayd

Chief Executive, Agile Coaching Institute, LLC
Since 2001, I have been immersed in Agile & Lean thinking and practices. From the beginning, I was drawn into large-scale transformation initiatives, especially the change and cultural aspects. I love to work at all levels of an organization, from teams and their managers to project offices and execs. I have educated thousands of people, coached scores of teams and worked with well over a hundred managers. I am currently writing a book entitled... Read More →


Monday August 5, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Governors A

2:00pm

Leadership behaviours to encourage or damage a learning community. (Chris Matts, Liz Keogh)
Limited Capacity filling up

This session will look at the behaviours of leaders that enhance or destroy a learning community. The Agile Community ( Conferences, Mail Groups, Local Groups and Companies ) will be used as an example of a learning community.

I will start by introducing the three types of leader in a learning community. The Trail Blazers (who find new ways of doing things), the Thought Leaders (who spread the word) and the Servants of the Community ( who create the spaces for learning ). As a warn up exercise, the room will break into groups to identify people who fit into each category of leadership. Participants will also be asked to identify people who encourage learning. These will be shared with the room. (10 Minutes) < Spoiler - Expect movement and sticky notes >

The groups will then identify examples of behaviour that encourage community learning. These will be shared with the room. (10 Minutes)

The groups will then identify examples of damaging behaviour that discourage community learning. These are the behaviours that discourage people from learning, experimenting, or sharing.... That prevent the birth, growth and spread of ideas. (Participants will be encouraged to share stories but mention no names). These will be shared with the room. (10 Minutes) < Spoiler - you guessed it >

The groups will then discuss strategies they have used for dealing with damaging behaviour. These will be shared with the room. (25 Minutes) < Spoiler - Sticky Notes, Movement, Flipcharts and An Accelerated Goldfish bowl >

The groups will then discuss how an understanding of these behaviours and strategies can be transferred into their own working environments. (10 Minutes)

We will wrap up with a short facilitated reflection.

To start the discussion of good and damaging behaviour, I can spare a number of stories I have encountered over the past few years (No names will be mentioned):

* Thought leaders who travel across the world to encourage trail blazers to re-engage with the

Speakers
avatar for LIZ KEOGH

LIZ KEOGH

Lunivore Limited
Liz Keogh is a Lean and Agile consultant based in London. She is a well-known blogger and international speaker, a core member of the BDD community and a contributor to a number of open-source projects including JBehave. She has a strong technical background with over 15 years’ experience in delivering value and coaching others to deliver, from small start-ups to global enterprises. Most of her work now focuses on Lean, Agile and... Read More →


Monday August 5, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Bayou D

2:00pm

Moving Your Organization into the Fast Lane - Delighting Your Customers (Michael Vincent)
Limited Capacity seats available

Organizations today want to be more responsive to their marketplace opportunities, more productive and more efficient; they want to be agile. Many have implemented agile practices for improving software development. But if you want to move out of traffic and into the fast lane it requires leadership that emphasizes creating, satisfying and delighting customers every day.

This session focuses on leadership techniques for delighting your customers that you can take back and put to use. You will learn how a culture of delighting customers is built around a work force characterized by high levels of productivity, continuous innovation, and elevated levels of sustained motivation and job satisfaction.

Your customers are your lifeblood; it’s not enough just to satisfy them. You need them sharing their delight with others, sharing opportunities with you, and coming back again and again.

Move into the fast lane! Focus your organization on delighting your customers on a continuous long-term basis. It’s hard work but immensely rewarding.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Vincent

Michael Vincent

CEO, Agile Coach, MVA Software
Mike is a veteran software entrepreneur providing clients throughout North America with Scrum training and coaching, application lifecycle management training, and consultation. He is a Microsoft Visual Studio Application Lifecycle Management MVP and Scaled Professional Scrum Trainer.


Monday August 5, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Bayou E

2:00pm

Complex Projects aren't plannable but controllable (Jutta Eckstein)
Limited Capacity seats available

Science has finally approved it: Forecasting complex projects is a deception. Moreover, forecasts hinder innovations. Daniel Kahneman, Nobel Prize Winner in Economic Sciences and psychologist verified in many cases, that forecasting of complex projects is impossible. Yet still, we keep losing time trying to do exactly that. Beyond Budgeting (see e.g. http://www.bbrt.org/) came empirically to the same findings and offers a concept for controlling corporations without budgets. Additionally Beyond Budgeting provides advice for controlling even long-term complex projects. Agile methodologies generally recommend developing a long-term plan on a coarse-grained level only and coming up with detailed short-term plans iteratively.
I'm working on large and complex agile projects for more than 10 years. However, learning about Kahneman's and the Beyond Budgeting folks' work helped me a great deal in better understanding how planning, estimating and budgeting relate and why the traditional approaches don't work. Of course, we all know how this works in the small, how to plan and steer a project by iterations. Yet, how will you get the budget for starting a large agile project, how do you know how your tiny iterations (across many feature teams) fit the long-term project goal?
This is not about small simple projects. It is about complex projects, e.g. projects with 50-300 developers, taking 3-5 years to finish or similarly large product (line) development.

In this talk I want to provide insights in the latest scientific research and show as well how Beyond Budgeting and Agile principles can be combined so that even complex projects remain controllable.

Speakers
avatar for Jutta Eckstein

Jutta Eckstein

IT communication
Jutta Eckstein works as an independent coach, consultant, and trainer. She holds a M.A. in Business Coaching & Change Management, a Dipl.Eng. in Product-Engineering, and a B.A. in Education. She has helped many teams and organizations worldwide to make an Agile transition. She has a unique experience in applying Agile processes within medium-sized to large distributed mission-critical projects. She has published her experience in her books 'Agile... Read More →


Monday August 5, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Canal C/D

2:00pm

Integration testing in Enterprises using TaaS - via Case Study (Anand Bagmar)
Limited Capacity seats available

Typically in organizations, there are multiple projects / products. Many organisations like to have a common Test Automation solution across these products in an effort to standardize the framework.

However, this is not a good idea! Each product should be tested using the tools and technologies that are “right” for it. Yet - these different products talk with each other and you need to test the integration between them in an automated way.

“**TaaS**” is an open-source product that allows you do achieve the “correct” way of doing integration testing across a variety of products via Test Automation.

I will talk about:
* Why it is not a good idea to have a common test automation framework
* A way to automate the integration testing between different products, which use different tools and technologies as development and testing stack.

Speakers
avatar for Anand Bagmar

Anand Bagmar

Principal Consultant, QA, ThoughtWorks
I am passionate about shipping a quality product, building automated testing tools, test automation, infrastructure and frameworks. I have also built open-source tools related to testing - WAAT, TTA and TaaS. | | Specialties: Automated testing, building test automation frameworks, Agile, Coaching, Consulting


Monday August 5, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Canal B

2:00pm

Designing Empathy--Learning to Walk in Your Customer's Shoes (Jean Tabaka, Robyn Mourning)
Limited Capacity filling up

You are a Product Owner working hard to maintain a value-driven product backlog. That means you continually check in with what you mean by value. For us, that means checking in with your customers in new heartfelt ways. What adds value to them? What provides them function, commodity and delight? How can you act in love and service to them? Designing empathy into your product feature sets brings you into a deep relationship with your customers. Design from your head and heart to your customers' head and heart. Fortunately for all of us as product owners, George Kembel and his team at the d.School at Stanford University have been working for a number of years on approaches to help us develop customer empathy and to act on it. Having had the good fortune of working with George and his brother John, we have created a design empathy approach that draws from the d.School work. We have added some of our own brainstorming divergence and convergence approaches for data collection and knowledge massaging. This session affords you the opportunity to learn how to conduct our set of empathy activities: from empathy interviews all the way through a complete problem statement. Interactively in a workshop setting, we'll work in small teams to complete 2 of the steps of the overall process.


Speakers
avatar for Jean Tabaka

Jean Tabaka

Agile Fellow, CA
Hey all! I'm excited to be joining everyone here. I continue to be passionate about the ways that we can apply Agile principles and values to extend humaneness in how we work. Being able to bring my passion into my 13,000 person organization is exciting and daunting. But when you work with amazing people who want to do the right thing, why wouldn't you want to give it your best? My good ol' conviction in the power of facilitation and... Read More →


Monday August 5, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Bayou C

3:45pm

Agile Feedback & Communication (Bill Wake)
Limited Capacity seats available

Agile approaches *thrive* on communication and feedback. The whole point of being agile is to be able to quickly change direction: Feedback teaches us where to go, and intense communication helps us move there quickly.

Feedback occurs at all levels: when we write code, when we work together, when our product is used.

We'll start with an overview of feedback. We'll then look at the outermost level: delivering software and seeing the results of its use. Then we'll move to the project level: how a whole team can collaborate effectively. Finally, we'll explore the inner development loop: engineering techniques that help teams develop in a sustainable way. (Don't worry if you're not a programmer: we'll build your intuition for why these matter.)

You'll walk out with ideas that help you improve communication and feedback in your own team.

Speakers
avatar for Bill Wake

Bill Wake

Sr. Consultant, Industrial Logic, Inc.
Bill Wake (www.xp123.com) is a consultant with Industrial Logic, Inc. (http://industriallogic.com). Before that, he was an independent consultant from 2001 to 2007, then spent two years managing software development at Gene Codes Forensics. Bill has worked with teams in a variety of domains, including biotechnology, financial systems, web sales, and more. Hes the co-author of Design Patterns in Java and Refactoring in Ruby.


Monday August 5, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Delta B

3:45pm

Discover What Motivates You / Your Team (Andrew Fuqua)
Limited Capacity full

What motivates you? What motivates your teammates/employees? Find out with this fun exercise, Moving Motivators, and create your Motivational Balance Sheet.

This workshop briefly introduces the superiority of taking advantage of intrinsic motivation over attempting to use extrinsic motivation, then leads the participants through a couple exercises. These exercises are great for leaders to use as a tool to better understand the people in their team. They are also useful to help people understand themselves.

This workshop got great reviews as an open space topic at the 2012 Scrum Gathering in Atlanta and at Product Camp 2012.

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Fuqua

Andrew Fuqua

Enterprise Agile Coach, Leading Agile
Lean/Agile Coach, Consultant. | Avid bicyclist. Swimmer.


Monday August 5, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Bayou D

3:45pm

Physical Environments to Support Agile Teams – Harnessing the Power of Place (Cindy Coleman, Jorgen Hesselberg)
Limited Capacity seats available

Agile work processes often depend on extreme physical co-location – side by side, just-in-time collaboration, shared visual access to information. But tight team co-location presents some significant and sometimes paradoxical challenges: how does one account for people’s need for deep concentration while also supporting high-bandwidth (out loud) communication? How can you create powerful team identity while preserving individuals' sense of their own space? How to integrate off-site team members in a physical workspace? How to balance real-estate cost-savings with the need for advanced tools and team support? How to engage tool-building team members in the design of a space that is a tool for their work? Jorgen Hesselberg, Senior Manager for Agile Enterprise Adoption at Nokia and Cindy Coleman, Strategist at the international architectural firm Gensler, discuss how Nokia successfully transformed from a traditional cube-land to a more tailored co-located setting. Heavy on visual illustrations, concrete examples and meaningful lessons learned, this talk is relevant for any organization considering a move to a high-performing, collaborative workspace

Speakers

Monday August 5, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Governors E

3:45pm

As distributed as it gets: 10 Agile best practices from open source (Mik Kersten)
Limited Capacity seats available

Open source development combines distributed teams, resource constraints and an overload of end user input. Despite these challenges, the velocity of popular open source projects is measurably higher than that of their enterprise counterparts. The time has come to bridge the lessons learned from open source development with enterprise Agile. We will start with an examination of several successful open source projects and their take on Agile delivery. In this talk, Dr. Mik Kersten, creator of the Eclipse Mylyn project which now sees 2M downloads/month, will review the overlap of open source approaches and Agile methods and highlight 10 best practices that Agile practitioners can apply to improve the collaboration and productivity of their teams. Each of the 10 best practices will be grounded in empirical data collected from Mylyn and other public open source projects hosted on Apache and GitHub. Graphics and visualizations will demonstrate how open source collaboration evolves over time to provide the audience with an intuitive appreciation for this style of Agile delivery. Attendees will learn strategies for connecting the lean methodologies of Agile and open source development with the application lifecycle management and predictability needs of large-scale enterprise Agile.

Speakers
avatar for Mik Kersten

Mik Kersten

CEO, Tasktop


Monday August 5, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Governors C

3:45pm

DevOps isn't Enough for Your Dysfunctional Organization (Mandi Walls)
Limited Capacity seats available

Large enterprise has spent years building silo'd teams, dividing tasks and amassing armies in the org chart. As technical people, our desire to find a technical solution to a problem often leaves us blind to people issues such as uncertainty, fear, and organizational politics. We cannot install a toolchain and magically get DevOps.

In this talk, we'll look at the common hurdles faced by silo'd teams when trying to adopt a DevOps mindset for development and operations teams, and how to involve more teams in modern practices. We'll look at product management, IT services, and support teams specifically, and how their functions can be included in a DevOps rollout.

We'll discuss methods for assessing readiness and gauging progress while retooling any processes that can't support the collaborative environment you want from your DevOps experience. One of the most powerful methods for cultural and business process change is starting with a full assessment of your processes, team structures, assets, and installed technologies. Your assessment gives you a starting place for targeting methods and tools that you'll want to think about changing or improving, including things that might be manual or opaque. We'll talk about what you should be looking for during your assessment and suggest who you will want to talk to.

Assessments also shine light on the people and teams in your organization and how they do their jobs. It's your opportunity to find out how their interteam relationships function, how they work together, and what really bothers people about the current processes. The information is invaluable for making strategic decisions while working towards a culture more in tune with DevOps.

We'll also discuss how to plan your assessment, who to talk to, and how to distill the information you collect, turning it into knowledge.

Speakers
MW

Mandi Walls

Opscode
Home for a while! More adventures in the planning stages! I work a lot!


Monday August 5, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Bayou E

3:45pm

Empirical Leadership: Proven Alternatives to Agile for Executives (Christopher Avery)
Limited Capacity seats available

Selling agile for management has become a favorite calling and pastime. And resistance to agile by management continues to be a common response. Most of us know of stories where management in large corporations actually say “don’t talk to us about ‘agile’”.

So what’s the agile evangelist to do?

When faced with this challenge I decided to search for other approaches to managing that “felt” agile but (a) did not use the same name and (b) originated in management (as opposed to development). That means I was looking for proven approaches that are holistic, empirical, and rooted in systems thinking.

And I found some. This session will share what I found and make two promises:

For agilists challenged with selling agile to management, it will provide agile-like alternatives that executives may be more receptive to hearing, and thus to trying.

For executives attracted to agile challenged with understanding how agile could work in management, operations, strategy, sales, etc., this session will provide alternatives that have been developed and proven in those management arenas.

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Avery

Christopher Avery

Author and CEO of Partnerwerks, Inc., Partnerwerks, Inc.
I help people find, embrace, and master their natural leadership ability. Author of "The Responsibility Process: Unlocking Your Natural Ability to Live and Lead with Power" and the classic "Teamwork Is An Individual Skill: Getting Your Work Done When Sharing Responsibility." CEO of Partnerwerks, Inc., distributor of The Responsibility Process® products and services. Host of The Leadership Gift™ Program, for a better, more productive way... Read More →


Monday August 5, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Delta D

3:45pm

Beyond Requirements Dictator: How Agile Helped A Business Analyst Discover Her Real Value (Diane Zajac-Woodie)
Limited Capacity filling up

When I started as a Business Analyst, I would obsess over every task that I learned. I submitted in depth requirement plans, created detailed meeting minutes, and clearly documented complex requirements. I was new to IT and I thought these tasks were a reflection of my value to the organization.

After a few years, I was placed on one of the few agile teams at my large company. Our first agile coach started challenging our team’s assumptions and teaching us a different approach to our work. It was exciting to me, but equally unsettling as I began to question my own worth. If no one needed my checklists and documentation, then what was I supposed to do?

Then I realized that *my value is not in the tasks that I do*.

In this session, I will share my journey of discovering how to provide real value as a business analyst on an agile team. For those BA’s struggling with how they fit into this new world, I will provide practical ideas for redefining the role of a business analyst as more than a requirements dictator. I will close by illustrating how BA’s, as well as the rest of the team, can reap the benefits of broadening their roles and striving to become generalizing specialists.

Speakers
avatar for Diane Zajac-Woodie

Diane Zajac-Woodie

Agent of Change, Green Jeans Consulting
http://www.greenjeansconsulting.com/ http://agilesquirrel.blogspot.com/


Monday August 5, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Canal B

3:45pm

The Agile Cognitive Bias: How our internal models affect the problems and solutions we see (Manoj Vadakkan, Bob Payne)
Limited Capacity seats available

The Lean/Agile community has many different models. Models and frameworks help us simplify reality to solve problems for our teams and organizations. But they also reinforce cognitive biases and force us to shoehorn reality to fit the models. Even when it doesn’t fit...

We will explore several cognitive bias categories including: Anchoring, Availability Cascade, Bandwagon Effect, Confirmation Bias, Expectation Bias and the Framing Effect.

An example from the Agile world : A team failing to meet expectations that they set. Based on common models, we may think:

* They have exceeded their WIP limit. (Kanban)
* They are overcommitting or have interference from the “Chickens”. (Scrum)
* They see failure as a personal indictment or as not tolerated. (Growth/Fixed Mindset)
* They are in the Resistance or Chaos phase. (Satir Change Model)
* The organization has not supported or empowered them appropriately (Servant Leadership)


This interactive workshop will explore how these valuable tools and frameworks can limit our ability to see the realities we face and how. By being aware of this we can limit the negative effects of cognitive bias on our decisions.

Speakers
avatar for Bob Payne

Bob Payne

VP Consulting Services, LitheSpeed
An early adopter of Extreme Programming, Scrum and SAFe, Bob has worked exclusively as a Lean+Agile Transformation leader since 1999.   | | Bob hosts the Agile Toolkit podcast and has produced over 170 podcasts, recording a variety of industry leaders and Agile practitioners. His consulting and training style is build on years of Lean+Agile experience, a MSEE in Computer Architectures for Artificial Intelligence and having grown up... Read More →
avatar for Manoj Vadakkan

Manoj Vadakkan

Manoj Vadakkan is a Certified Scrum Trainer (CST) and an Agile software development consultant. Manoj has experience in helping companies adopting an Agile way of working. He conducts Scrum trainings all over the world. Manoj has 20 years of experience in Software Development and Project Management.  He shares his experiences by presenting at national and international conferences and by his active participation in the Washington DC Metro... Read More →


Monday August 5, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Bayou B

3:45pm

The Power of Intuition in the Age of Uncertainty (Jim Elvidge)
Limited Capacity seats available

We have passed into a new era; one in which it is impossible to keep up with the flow of information. As a result, uncertainty and ambiguity play an exponentially increasing role in our workplace and our lives. We can no longer rely on methodical analysis to make decisions. Fortunately, there is a powerful method for making quality yet fuzzy decisions that fits perfectly into a probe-sense-respond type of system; in other words, most every situation that we encounter. This talk will demonstrate how agile principles are becoming increasingly important in today’s age of uncertainty. I will then discuss the incredible power of the subconscious mind and how it actually processes the same data as the conscious mind, but in a much more effective manner. Methods to enhance the power of your own intuition will be explored and practiced via workshop exercises. This concept should be extremely useful for agile coaches, ScrumMasters, catalytic leaders, and others working in an industry fraught with ambiguity.

Speakers
avatar for Jim  Elvidge

Jim Elvidge

Principal Agile Coach, BigVisible Solutions


Monday August 5, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Canal A

3:45pm

The Storytelling Battle : To Lead A Change , Create Its Story (Oana Juncu)
Limited Capacity filling up

Einstein said that if You cannot tell it simply, it means you don't understand it. I like to re-phrase this great quote and say If you cannot tell it to children, so they understand you, you didn’t get t yet yourself. Neuro-science studies found out that 70% of what we learn, comes from stories we heard. Human brain reacts to stories far better that to linear presentation of facts. People like to hear and tell stories where they recognize themselves in, not only as heroes of fiction wonder novels, but also in day-to-day business life. When someone asks a business case for a given approach/topic/implementation, the real demand is for a true story about that theoretical stuff.
Sometimes people may get out of lectures and if they are asked 'What was the presentation was about actually?' the best answer they can give is 'It was about 60 slides'. Storytelling (or Business Narrative) is a powerful way to help organizations and teams embrace change, and change agents are good storytellers. This workshop proposes a set-up to learn some narrative techniques that will empower participants willing to become ( Agile) change Agents or simply allow them to effectively send the messages they want.
The workshop proposes to build the description of a chosen topic via a story, using story construction telling techniques. It aims to help participants learn storytelling as an improvement technique to build messages that matter. The workshop focuses on 2 axes: Give participant a powerful practice to become a change Agent and seed engagement in their audience. Prove the effectiveness and persistence of the story format to teach something. (If you don't feel it, you won't remember it.)

Speakers
avatar for Oana Juncu

Oana Juncu

Founder, cOemerge
Oana\'s over 15 years of experience in Software Development and System Management led her choice to Agile, as the most effective approach for 21st century leading organizations focused on quality products creation that matter . She recently embraced the entrepreneurship path by founding cOemerge : www.coemerge.com , a company that helps its clients embrace Agility and build product that matters trhough Lean Startup.Oana acts as Agile... Read More →


Monday August 5, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Bayou A

3:45pm

Enterprise Product Owner's Challenge: Managing Networks of Backlogs (Alan Goerner)
Limited Capacity filling up

Product Owner is a demanding role. The care and skill with which this role is played is a major determinant of project success or failure. This simple truth, though, becomes amplified from a whisper to a shout: as projects become programs; as one stakeholder constituency becomes many; as products become product lines; as one or two releases become real release plans; and as changing market and resource conditions cause necessary shifts in priorities. Under these conditions, Product Owner develops from a role to a discipline, one of vital and urgent import for enterprises.

This talk outlines the role of Product Owner as a set of risks to be managed, outcomes to be achieved, and practices to be applied. We begin with an essential risk analysis: What risks is a Product Owner responsible for managing? What risks does a Product Owner introduce if the role is poorly played? Then, we ask: How does the role of Product Owner scale up? We contend that the role stretches and grows more complex in proportion to the number of constiuencies to manage and the scale of the product/project/program lifecycle? These two factors can be combined and represented in a network of backlogs. Examples are given of a real, highly complex and specialized backlog network as well as a couple common patterns of backlog network of moderate complexity. Planning and management activities are defined as interactions among and manipulations of these backlogs. We go on to discuss the idea of traceability among the levels of elements in these backlogs and show that traceability is a necessary complement to the concept of backlog network.

Speakers
avatar for Alan  Goerner

Alan Goerner

Chief Agile Strategist, Valtech Technologies
My enduring interest is how human beings work with each other to achieve things, great and small. My fascination with Agile and Lean methods is their grounding in sound principles of how people think, work and feel. Much of the success of these methods lies in a realistic attitude about what satisfies, motivates, and coordinates (or not) people working to a common purpose. Most recently, I have become interested in the power of challenge... Read More →


Monday August 5, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Governors D

3:45pm

PMPs vs Agile Project Managers: Clash of the Titans (Juan Banda )
Limited Capacity full

To the foreign eye a PMP (Project Management Professional) is in one corner and in the opposite corner we have an Agile Project Manager, and this seems to be so because both advocate different vision of how to run a project, and even different conceptions about what a project really is. PMP practices have been mainstream for years in project management, but in the last decade Agile gained more popularity and now seems to be ready to challenge the champion for the belt. But is really so that this two are really opposed? Don’t miss this fight that doesn’t promise knockouts but instead may go to distance.

Speakers
avatar for Juan Banda

Juan Banda

Scrum Coach, Innovision
I'm a trainer, coach, speaker, blogger, martial artist and out of the box thinker.


Monday August 5, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Canal E

3:45pm

Testautomation Coderetreat (Markus Gärtner)
Limited Capacity seats available

A few years ago Corey Haines invented the code retreat format. Since the first two global days of code retreat, the format seems to spread more and more. The concept is simple: over the course of a day, work in six different pairs on the ever same problem, write the best code you ever wrote, throw away your code after 45 minutes, and start from scratch.

Recently new formats seem to be invented bringing the format of a code retreat to new learning objectives. In this session, Markus will provide a brief look into the code retreat format for functional testautomation. The participants will work on a small internet application, automating tests using tools like Selenium or Watir, and sharing each other's experience with the different tools and frameworks around. The programming language, the test framework, and maybe even the test driver will be decided upon by the different pairs right in the session. Please bring your laptop prepared if you want to try any particular tool.

Why should I attend?

1. You will get to know how web applications can be tested with an automation framework
2. You will strengthen your techniques around test automation code
3. You will exchange your thoughts with other test automation developers.

Speakers
avatar for Markus Gärtner

Markus Gärtner

it-agile GmbH
Markus Gärtner works as a testing programmer, trainer, coach, and consultant with it-agile GmbH, Hamburg, Germany. Markus, author of ATDD by Example - A Practical Guide to Acceptance Test-Driven Development, a student of the work of Jerry Weinberg, founded the German Agile Testing and Exploratory workshop in 2011. He is a black-belt instructor in the Miagi-Do school of Software Testing and contributes to the Softwerkskammer, the Germany Software... Read More →


Monday August 5, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Governors A

3:45pm

Sketch You Can! Demystifying a Powerful Collaboration Technique (Jeremy Kriegel)
Limited Capacity full

This meeting is a waste of my time. When was the last time you had that thought? Was it because the conversation wasn't focused, or people couldn't agree, or maybe they were in violent agreement, but couldn't see it? How easily do you think you can get this meeting back on track? In this session, you will learn a skill that you can apply on the spot that will help you focus the conversation and drive to consensus. Everything you need is probably already in the room.

This technique is specifically for conversations around the features, functions, and behaviors of your product. Most people are visual thinkers, so give them something visual to focus on. You can do that by walking up to the whiteboard and drawing out what people are talking about. By visually capturing the conversation in a public way, you will help all participants understand each other and come to consensus faster. But I can't draw, you say. Neither can I, and I’ve been successfully using this technique for over 15 years. If you can draw a straight-ish line and a box, you have all the drawing skills necessary.

In this engaging workshop, you will learn how to create a basic sketch of an interface using some simple sketching techniques and UX principles as well as practice thinking-on-your-feet that will help you comfortably do this with a group.

I have used this technique to help teams focus the conversation, visualize the requirements they were requesting, quickly experiment with new ideas, and provide detailed input that I can use to design the outcome. Often, the sketch (or a photo of it) acts as the deliverable for simple problems, eliminating the need for more formal wireframes. This technique is accessible to everyone. You don’t need any special software and anyone on the team can use it. Pick up the pen and get on track again.


Speakers
avatar for Jeremy Kriegel

Jeremy Kriegel

UX Manager, BzzAgent
Jeremy Kriegel has been designing great user experiences (UX) for 18 years. Just as we need to understand the needs and context of users to craft a design solution, Jeremy believes that success also requires us to look at the business context to craft an appropriate design process. From start-ups to Fortune 100 companies, as a consultant or on an internal team, he has seen a lot of different scenarios that each required their own approach. He... Read More →


Monday August 5, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Bayou C

3:45pm

Co-Creation - Working with customers to create valuable products (Raj Mudhar)
Limited Capacity seats available

Co-creation is a business strategy that focuses on customer interaction for joint innovation of new products. Alcatel-Lucent's Wireless business has adopted co-creation: bringing customers directly into our R&D facilities to partner with us to develop new products for their networks. Co-creation has many benefits and challenges. Early and frequent feedback from customers from ideation through production is a key benefit. Managing intellectual property rights, export control and legal requirements in different countries are some of the challenges.

In this talk, we'll walk through the process of co-creation, looking at two models. The first is an arms-length model that enables customer interaction, however in a limited way. The second is a model where engineering teams from the customer and the supplier work side-by-side everyday, creating and innovating together.

We'll take a close look at the benefits and challenges of co-creation, describing some of our real-world experiences co-creating on telecom products. This is an opportunity to explore new ways of engaging your customers, creating an innovation partnership which offers early value creation for both customers and their suppliers.

Speakers
avatar for Raj Mudhar

Raj Mudhar

Agilist, Raj Mudhar & Associates Ltd.
I'm passionate about technology, and the knowledge that organizations can improve, deliver higher value to customers, while making the workplace an engine of engagement, innovation, and sustainability


Monday August 5, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Canal C/D

7:00pm

Ice Breaker
Monday August 5, 2013 7:00pm - 10:00pm
Delta A
 
Tuesday, August 6
 

8:30am

Open Jam Huddle

Not finding the session you were looking for? Want to delve deeper into a session you went to? Have an edgy or groundbreaking topic to share? Got some questions you want to discuss?

 

Then you want to come to Open Jam, where folks gather to introduce thoughts and take away ideas while building off of one another's creativity.

 

Anyone may convene an Open Jam session. They are short sessions that run throughout the day, from early in the morning, like Lean Coffee, and sometimes late into the evening! All you need to lead a session is passion and commitment.

 

We encourage interactive sessions providing opportunities to explore ideas and techniques. Sessions don't need to be formal, in fact, it's more fun if they are not!

 

So come to the Open Jam daily huddle at 8:30AM in the Jack Daniels space to choose a time slot for your session, then announce it to fellow conference participants so they can join! Feel free to tweet or promote your session using the conference hashtag #agile2013.

 

Follow @Open_Jam on Twitter for updates to what’s happening at the Open Jam track. Explore more, join Open Jam!


Tuesday August 6, 2013 8:30am - 9:00am
Open Jam - Jack Daniels

9:00am

Agile Software Development with Distributed Teams: Agility, Distribution and Trust (Siva Dorairaj)
Limited Capacity filling up

Trust among team members is imperative for the success of a software development project. Little is known about how distributed teams in Agile software development could build trust between team members separated across different geographical sites, time zones and cultures. Through a Grounded Theory study that involved 55 participants from 38 different software companies in the USA, India and Australia, we investigate the key emergent concerns of distributed teams in Agile software development. We found that members of a distributed team need to build trust with one another in order to become a successful Agile team. In this paper, we present techniques for building trust in Agile software development with distributed teams.


Speakers
avatar for Siva Dorairaj

Siva Dorairaj

Teaching Fellow, Victoria University of Wellington
A PhD researcher from Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. Through a Grounded Theory study which involved 55 participants from 38 different software companies in the USA, India and Australia, I investigated key concerns of distributed teams in Agile software development. Subsequently I developed a grounded theory -- "The Theory of One-team: Agile Software Development with Distributed Teams" -- which explicates how a distributed team in... Read More →


Tuesday August 6, 2013 9:00am - 9:30am
Presidential Boardroom

9:00am

Agile Teams & Collaboration: What's New About Agile? (Johanna Rothman)
Limited Capacity seats available

Before you transition to agile, you are accustomed to functional roles, people who “owned the code,” and time to bake quality in. In agile we have cross-functional teams, collective code and quality ownership, and a collective notion of “done.” It sounds like we magically become a big happy family, doesn’t it?

Teams don’t just become self-organized cross-functional happy teams. They have to work to get that way. In this talk, Johanna will help you understand some of the challenges teams face, and how agile practices help. She’ll also help you understand some of the practices that don’t help, such as multitasking and distributed teams.

We’ll talk about some models for scaling agile, such as Scrum of Scrums, and a network model of scaling. No matter what problems you encounter on your agile team, retrospectives are the one way the team can help itself solve its own problems.

Speakers
avatar for Johanna Rothman

Johanna Rothman

President, Rothman Consulting
Johanna Rothman, known as the "Pragmatic Manager," provides frank advice for your tough problems. She helps leaders and teams see problems and resolve risks and manage their product development. | | Johanna was the Agile 2009 conference chair. She is the current agileconnection.com technical editor. Johanna is the author of several books including: Agile and Lean Program Management: Scaling Collaboration Across the Organization... Read More →


Tuesday August 6, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Delta B

9:00am

Awesome Retrospectives (and other important meetings) with Remote Attendees (Peter Green)
Limited Capacity filling up

I used to refuse to facilitate retrospectives for remote teams, believing they just wouldn't be very effective. Then I simply had to do some for an extended group with both in-person and remote teams, and I discovered I was dead wrong: Retrospectives for remote teams don't have to suck! I learned how to translate my favorite in-person techniques into online versions using screen sharing/remote collaboration tools like Adobe Connect, GoToMeeting, WebEx, etc. and I'll share that approach with attendees by facilitating a live, remote retrospective in the room then debriefing.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Green

Peter Green

Coach and Trainer, Agile For All
Peter Green led a grass roots Agile transformation at Adobe from 2005 to 2015, starting with his own team, Adobe Audition. His influence includes the teams behind such software flagships as Photoshop, Acrobat, After Effects, Flash, Dreamweaver and Premiere Pro, as well as dozens of internal IT and platform technology teams and groups such as marketing and globalization. His work was a major factor enabling Adobe product teams to successfully... Read More →


Tuesday August 6, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Governors C

9:00am

Complement discussions and clarify everything with sketches (Sophie Freiermuth)
Limited Capacity seats available

Conversations, emails, bugs, user stories - communications still rely heavily on words. Doodles and sketches should start entering the dev room, as they can carry tremendous amounts of information and help clarify the subject at hand and level understanding. Remembering that documentation doesn't need to be comprehensive, there are great benefits to taking pen and paper and entering into ultra-low fidelity documentation, aka sketching.

Sketches can be done with all sorts of skills, however rather than their aesthetic value, it's their ability to accurately transfer information that makes them invaluable tools during product development, at any stage: idea generation, idea clarification, user story details, etc.

I've often and successfully applied sketching in my agile projects and am making them everyday a greater part of my practice when working with Agile teams.

In this workshop, I will share basic sketching tips and practices to help everyone begin experimenting with this additional way of communicating. It gets better with practice, and is easier to start with a bit of support.
This hands-on session will help anyone with no sense of design and proportions start sketching with confidence, and help focus on the purpose of the sketch: enhancing clarity and facilitating discussions.


Tuesday August 6, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Governors A

9:00am

Counteracting The Systemic Oppression of Traditional Development Thinking (Damon Poole)
Limited Capacity seats available

Every day, across a wide variety of software and IT organizations, people are being oppressed. At this point, the oppression has become so systemic, so ingrained, and so accepted as "business as usual" or "the culture around here" that it is effectively invisible. In the software industry we casually talk about "death marches" and how people that give up their vacations, weekends, and special events at their kid's schools are "real team players." We routinely set ridiculous deadlines that nobody believes in to "motivate" people into "giving it their all." And for what? Is a little extra bonus money worth the broken relationships, lost time with your children, high stress, guilt, unhappiness, and impact on health?

Unfortunately, one of the reasons that Agile adoptions fail is that implementing the principles and values of the Agile Manifesto requires breaking the deeply ingrained habits of oppression. It is time to do more than just offer the solution of Agile development, it is time bring the subject to light and provide ways to counteract oppressive behavior.

Who is to blame? Is it a certain personality type or role? No. The root cause is not a person, it is the practices and organizational structures of traditional development itself. It is the system, not the people. Truly addressing the problem means changing the practices and organizational structures to support a healthy work environment. But the path to change starts with awareness and coping mechanisms.

In this session, participants will take a journey of self-discovery, realizing how they unknowingly practice, enable, and condone oppressive behaviors that they wouldn't allow in other contexts. After having their eyes opened, they will then interactively learn and practice ways to peacefully and constructively counteract oppressive behaviors. As those practicing oppressive behavior experience new and more effective ways to handle the typical pressures of software development, they will also have less need to practice their old behaviors.

'To accept passively an unjust system is to cooperate with that system; thereby the oppressed become as evil as the oppressor.'

'Often the oppressor goes along unaware of the evil involved in his oppression so long as the oppressed accepts it.'

--Martin Luther King Jr.

'Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely.'

--The Agile Manifesto

 


Speakers
DP

Damon Poole

Chief Agilist, Eliassen Group


Tuesday August 6, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Bayou E

9:00am

Using NVC for Managing Conflict on Your Agile Team (Pat Arcady)
Limited Capacity seats available

If you work with people, conflict is inevitable. Even the most dynamic, productive teams experience conflict; disagreements arise, ideas collide, and passions about principles can be tested. This could possibly describe your relationship with a customer or two. A key question is: does conflict on your team or with a customer lead to resentment, rivalry or hostility? Whether you answer yes or no, what is the outcome you want and how can you achieve that?

Agile teams value responding to change over following a plan; collaborating with customers to meet their needs; and prioritizing individuals and interactions over processes and tools. A core component for being in alignment with these values is developing individual and team skills for handling conflict so it serves the desired outcome.

In this highly interactive program, participants will explore key skills for navigating differences and conflicts at work. You will learn a simple four-step protocol to follow for achieving outcomes that work for all parties involved. You are encouraged to bring your real life situations to the experience for practice.

Speakers

Tuesday August 6, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Governors E

9:00am

Code Literacy for Non-Programmers (Jonathan Berger)
Limited Capacity seats available

Should Designers be coding? How about Product Owners? Just how technical should your team be? In real-world Agile teams, traditionally defined roles are being displaced by a culture of collective ownership. Responsibilities are being decoupled from job titles by teammates with overlapping skills, and chief among those skills is technical acumen. Every day, it makes less and less sense to talk about skill sets as collections of binary “I can do this”‘s or “I don’t do that”‘s. In this talk, we’ll investigate how treating Coding as Literacy can affect the way decisions are made and work gets done, describe what varying levels of literacy among teammates, facilitate doing agile well, and discuss how to get literate in technical topics.

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Berger

Jonathan Berger

Principal, Discovery Studio
Jonathan Berger is a designer, developer and technologist who has been active in the NYC technology scene since around 2005, helping to organize events like the Agile Experience Design Meetup, the Pivotal Labs Tech Talk series in NY, Startup Weekend, Barcamp, Fashioncamp, and IgniteNYC. He spends his days building software with Pivotal Labs and his nights and weekends working on Market Publique. Prior to that, he earned a Bachelors in... Read More →


Tuesday August 6, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Canal B

9:00am

Architecture and collaboration: Cornerstones of Continuous Delivery (Tom Sulston, Rachel Laycock)
Limited Capacity filling up

Once you've been on a continuously-delivered project, there's no way back. The combination of rapid feedback, high levels of collaboration, and great software quality produces a virtuous delivery cycle that is both pleasing and effective.

However, existing delivery models and product portfolios may not allow for straightforward adoption of CD. Technical and organisational debt accumulates inexorably over time and can make continuous delivery difficult or even impossible.

In this session, we draw on our extensive project experience to demonstrate some of the software architecture patterns that enable continuous delivery. We look at related anti-patterns; and some strategies for getting a codebase into a shape such that it can be continuously delivered. We use examples of both successful and unsuccessful projects to show some of the rewards and pitfalls of following these strategies.

As the structure of a software product changes, the organisation of the teams building and supporting it will need to go through concomitant changes. Using more real project examples, we discuss what drives these organisational changes, how they can be managed, and how to base a delivery team around collaboration rather than conflict.

As we go, we engage members of the audience in a conversation about instances where they have seen similar issues, and encourage sharing of some methods that they might have tried.

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Laycock

Rachel Laycock

Lead Consultant, ThoughtWorks


Tuesday August 6, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Canal E

9:00am

Big Visible Testing (Claire Moss)
Limited Capacity seats available

This is the story of how I let go of being the lone tester and became the testing teacher and coach for my team. I have always thought of myself as an agile tester. However, over the past couple of years, I have transformed from a pseudo-agile tester to a true agile tester. To improve collaboration with the rest of my product delivery team, I have been gradually increasing the visibility of testing activities through exploratory test charter management, defect backlog organization, and paired exploratory testing with both testers and non-testers. The feedback loops have shortened and the abbreviated time between activities necessitated adjusting how I provide information.

Now that the audience for my testing comprises a mix of disciplines and the work environment has shifted from a heavier process to transparent, quick information access, I have been experimenting with different ways to execute testing and to represent the outcomes of that testing activity so that the information consumers understand it in ways that best suit each of their perspectives.

We will examine distinct agile team member personas and their implications for presenting and maintaining testing information as well as the inherent tensions between their distinct and various needs. I will trace my learning curve of adjusting to their needs through the various experiments I have completed in this context, though these lessons extend beyond a purely cross-functional agile product development team.

Attendees will come away with a fresh perspective on viewing their product team members and focus on the value testing artifacts provide to a software development team as well as answers to these questions

- What value can testing bring to an agile software product team?
- How can we focus on outcomes over output, both as an agile software product team and as tester contributors?
- How do you keep the work sustainable?
- How do we maintain effective communication?
- What does it mean to test in agile environments?

Speakers
avatar for Claire Moss

Claire Moss

Agile Tester, VersionOne
Software testing speaker, workshop facilitator, author, and blogger. Agile software tester working closely with product development team. I help teams to craft more testable user stories. Testing teacher, unit and integration test review and advisement, exploratory testing coach. Exploratory tester and test automator. | Claire Moss has always had a passion for writing, which might be a strange trait for a discrete mathematician, but that... Read More →


Tuesday August 6, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Canal A

9:00am

Play the Customer Development Game: A lean approach to business model discovery (Adrian Howard)
Limited Capacity filling up

Agile teams are great at building what you want - but how do you know what your customers need? This game-based workshop shows you how to discover the right product before you build the wrong business.

Each team will start a new business, describe it using the Business Model Canvas, and incrementally improve it using concepts from Lean Startup and Customer Development.

You already know how to build great products with Agile. Learn how to find the right product to build using Customer Development. See how Lean Startup combines Agile and Customer Development to get the best of both worlds.

Speakers
avatar for Adrian Howard

Adrian Howard

Quietstars
Adrian Howard is passionate about building effective teams and great products. He co-founded Quietstars to help organisations do that using Lean, Agile and User Experience practices. | | You'll find Adrian working with startup and product development teams — doing everything from coaching & teaching to hands on user experience & development work | | With more than fifteen years experience working with startups, established businesses... Read More →


Tuesday August 6, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Bayou A

9:00am

Agile Metrics, Velocity is NOT the goal (Michael Norton)
Limited Capacity full

Velocity is one of the most common metrics used—and one of the most commonly misused—on agile projects. Velocity is simply a measurement of speed in a given direction—the rate at which a team is delivering toward a product release. As with a vehicle en route to a particular destination, increasing the speed may appear to ensure a timely arrival. However, that assumption is dangerous because it ignores the risks with higher speeds. And while it’s easy to increase a vehicle’s speed, where exactly is the accelerator on a software team? In this session, you'll learn about the Hawthorne Effect and Goodhart's Law help us see that setting goals for velocity is actually detrimental to the team. We'll then dive into team issues that can negatively impact velocity, ways to stabilize fluctuating velocity, and methods to improve velocity without the risks. You'll leave with a toolkit of additional metrics that, coupled with velocity, give a better view of the project’s overall health.

Speakers
avatar for Doc Norton

Doc Norton

CEO, CTO2
Doc is passionate about working with teams to improve delivery and building great organizations. Once a dedicated code slinger, Doc has turned his energy toward helping teams, departments, and companies work better together in the pursuit of better software. Working with a wide range of companies such as Groupon, Nationwide Insurance, Belly, and many others, Doc has applied tenants of agile, lean, systems thinking, and servant leadership to... Read More →


Tuesday August 6, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Governors D

9:00am

Strategies for Agile Portfolio Management (Kenny Rubin)
Limited Capacity full

Do you work in an organization where development is expected to be done in an Agile way, but upper management operates in a way that makes being Agile downstream difficult? Do you feel like your organization is working on way too many products/projects at the same time? Are people so busy multitasking that they do the best job that they can on one project before hoping to the next--never really doing the high-quality work that is desired? If so, your organization needs to align Agile throughout the value chain starting with portfolio management!

Traditional portfolio management frequently uses principles that are at odds with agile thinking. For example, believing that people should be 100% utilized might lead to us to start many simultaneous projects leading to high levels of team-member multitasking. Managing a portfolio according to these principles all but guarantees a continuous stream of impediments that interfere with team-level agility and sub-optimizes delivered value.

In this session I discuss a framework of 11 strategies for aligning portfolio management with agile development to ensure a better end-to-end flow of value. Attendees will:
* Understand the framework's 11 strategies for how to restructure their portfolio-management process to better align it with core agile principles
* Be exposed to real-world examples of how other companies have successfully applied these strategies.
* Return to their organization and promote real change throughout their organizational value chains by ensuring that decisions at the portfolio level are well-aligned with and do not disrupt the fast, flexible flow of work that Scrum team perform downstream.

Speakers
avatar for Ken Rubin

Ken Rubin

Managing Principal, Innolution
Ken Rubin is Managing Principal at Innolution, a company that provides Scrum and agile training and coaching to help companies develop products in an effective and economically sensible way. A Certified Scrum Trainer, Ken has trained over 22,000 people on agile and Scrum, Kanban, Smalltalk development, managing object-oriented projects, and transition management. He has coached over 200 companies, ranging from start-ups to Fortune 10. Ken was... Read More →


Tuesday August 6, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Canal C/D

9:00am

Leveling Up (Ron Jeffries, Chet Hendrickson)
Limited Capacity seats available

Most teams undertaking Agile get some benefit, and then sometimes they hit a plateau. They might sense that there's more but not be able to see it, or maybe they don't even realize there's more benefit to be had.

Let's talk about your situation, and about some next steps for raising your team's score. Skills, teamwork, interactions ... everything's on the table.

Speakers
CH

Chet Hendrickson

HendricksonXP
RJ

Ron Jeffries

www.xprogramming.com


Tuesday August 6, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Delta D

9:00am

Beyond Stories, an Intro to ATDD, BDD & HDD (David Bulkin)
Limited Capacity filling up

Traditional requirements approaches don’t work, but user stories and acceptance criteria are often not enough.

So, what is the answer?

Testable examples!

Testable examples, sometimes called executable specifications, provide a lightweight, objective description of a need. They serve as a **common language across roles**, from business to the development team, allowing us to **understand and improve our business rules**. As an added benefit they can be used to automate acceptance level testing.

In this workshop we will create several testable examples allowing you to immediately apply this technique in your work.

Speakers
DB

David Bulkin

VP and Head of Training Services, LitheSpeed
David Bulkin is a VP and Head of Training Services at LitheSpeed, where he delivers training and coaching to clients in North America, Australia, India, Europe and Africa. David is a part time agile editor at InfoQ, and co-founder of the Agile Leadership Network of NJ. David has 30 years experience delivering software and systems and has been applying agile methods for 10+ years across the entire value stream from strategy and product ideation to... Read More →


Tuesday August 6, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Bayou B

9:00am

The experience canvas: how to use a core tool from the experience driven playbook (Justin Koke, Eewei Chen)
Limited Capacity seats available

Atlassian has a 10 year history of creating innovative software products. We struggled to include UX within our Agile and Lean teams. After making a lot of mistakes, we came up with the Experience Driven Development Playbook. It allows all our autonomous teams to include experience design effectively and remain strongly user centered and fast.

The Experience Driven Development Playbook, that Jurgen Spangl will introduce in his talk, is a radical set of strategies to play with your team. At the core of the Playbook is the Experience Canvas. Inspired by the business model canvas, the Experience Canvas is quite different to any other documentation we currently have on projects. It is not a spec, and it is not a roadmap or anything in between. It is more like insurance: it helps us stay honest. The canvas is driven by the whole team, not just the designers or project managers and it constrains the boundaries rather than the outcome. It's not a document, it's a tool like a barometer.

We will cover the playbook in the introduction and tell you all about how we can to make one in the first place. We have very autonomous teams, packed full of very smart people who we trust to do the right thing. Each team works in a way that makes sense to them, we don't dictate a process that everyone must follow. The playbook came from wanting to ensure that all the work we do in various teams hit a particular quality level in terms of design, is user centered, solves the right problem, etc...We took our inspiration from sports team playbooks that contain plays that the team uses to play together and win. The experience canvas is one of those plays, and probably one of the most important ones. It is the first play in the book.

We will share with everyone how we introduced it to our organisation, how it works, where we're trying to improve it and how it has affected the way we work. If you are in a product team, this workshop is for you, whether you have tried to integrate UX successfully or unsuccessfully or if you are in a


Speakers
avatar for Eewei Chen

Eewei Chen

Customer Experience Director, Digital Product Strategist, Eewei.com
@Ultraman Digital Product Strategist, Customer Experience Director and writer of 101 Design Ingredients to Solve Big Tech Problems @101DI
avatar for Justin Koke

Justin Koke

Team Lead, Atlassian


Tuesday August 6, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Bayou C

9:00am

Got Value? Making Continual Product Decisions with a Practical, Sustainable Value Model (Ellen Gottesdiener)
Limited Capacity filling up

Working with stakeholders (customer, business and technology perspectives) to effectively and efficiently deliver high-value products begins and ends with value. “Value” is the beacon, watchword, end game, justification and mantra for Agile. It is the basis of the big “why”.

Value means fair return in exchange for time, money, goods, or services. One way to assess value can be summarized as IRACIS: Increase Revenue, Avoid Costs (including avoiding loss by protecting revenue), and Improve Service. But that’s not enough. Value is in the eyes of the beholder. Furthermore, value can be tangible (money, market share) and intangible (customer loyalty, desirability, feasibility, differentiation).

You assess value by weighting benefits, costs, and risks, and incorporating value considerations—variables used to assess value of product options. You make product decisions at every turn throughout discovery and delivery based on value, balancing multiple considerations and perspectives.

Many agile teams struggle to clearly, concisely and continually use value as the basis for making decisions about what backlog items to pull and plan for. Explore a lightweight framework for collaboratively—and continually—identifying stakeholder values and making value-based decisions on what to build.

Speakers
avatar for Ellen Gottesdiener

Ellen Gottesdiener

CEO/Founder, EBG Consulting
Ellen Gottesdiener is an internationally recognized leader in the convergence of agile + requirements + product management and a pioneer in the use of collaborative practices for product discovery. She offers techniques, tools, training, and leadership in how you can engage in ways that excite, invite, and produce valuable product outcomes and happy teams. | | Ellen is a world-renowned writer, speaker, and presenter. Her most recent book... Read More →


Tuesday August 6, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Bayou D

9:45am

Proposing Regulatory-Driven Automated Test Suites (Patrick Morrison, Laurie Williams, Casper Holmgreen and Aaron Massey)
Limited Capacity seats available

In regulated domains such as finance and health care, failure to comply with regulation can lead to financial, civil and criminal penalties. While systems vary from organization to organization, the same regulations apply for all systems. As a result, efficiencies could be gained if the commonalities between systems could be captured in public, shared, test suites for regulations. We propose the use of Behavior-Driven-Development (BDD) technology to create these test suites. With BDD, desired system behavior with respect to regulatory requirements can be captured as constrained natural language ‘scenarios’. The scenarios can then be automated through system-specific test drivers. The goal of this research is to enable organizations to compare their systems to regulation in a repeatable and traceable way through the use of BDD. To evaluate our approach, we developed seven scenarios based on the HITECH Act Meaningful Use (MU) regulations for healthcare. We then created system-specific code for three open-source electronic health record systems. We found that it was possible to create scenarios and system-specific code supporting scenario execution on three systems, that iTrust can be shown to be non-compliant, that emergency access procedures aren’t defined clearly enough by the regulation to determine compliance or non-compliance.


Speakers

Tuesday August 6, 2013 9:45am - 10:15am
Presidential Boardroom

10:45am

Assessing an Organization's Capability to Effectively Implement Its Selected Agile Method(s): An Objectives, Principles, Strategies Approach (Shvetha Soundararajan, Osman Balci, James Arthur)
Limited Capacity seats available

Agile methods provide an organization or a team with the flexibility to adopt a selected subset of principles and practices based on their culture, their values, and the types of systems that they develop. More specifically, every organization or team implements a customized agile method, tailored to better accommodate its needs. However, the extent to which a customized method supports the organizational objectives, i.e. the ‘goodness’ of that method, should be demonstrable. Existing agile assessment approaches focus on comparative analyses, or are limited in scope and application. In this research, we present a systematic, comprehensive approach to assessing the ‘goodness’ of agile methods. We examine an agile method based on (1) its adequacy, (2) the capability of the organization to support the adopted principles and practices specified by the method, and (3) the method’s effectiveness. We employ the Objectives, Principles and Strategies (OPS) Framework to guide our assessment process. The Framework identifies (a) objectives of the agile philosophy, (b) principles that support the objectives and (c) strategies that implement the principles. It also defines (d) linkages that relate objectives to principles, and principles to strategies, and finally, (e) indicators for assessing the extent to which an organization supports the implementation and effectiveness of those strategies. The propagation of indicator values along the linkages provides a multi-level assessment view of the agile method. In this paper, we discuss our assessment approach and substantiation results.


Speakers

Tuesday August 6, 2013 10:45am - 11:15am
Presidential Boardroom

10:45am

Agile Requirements & Product Management (Jeff Patton)
Limited Capacity seats available

These aren’t the same old concepts repackaged. Understanding and communicating requirements in an Agile environment is a very different way of thinking and working.

In this talk, Jeff will explain where the idea of the agile story came from, and how best to write and use them. You’ll learn how stories help you manage the flow of discussion and work from big ideas all the way through to delivery. You’ll learn how to break big ideas down into organized backlogs using story mapping. You’ll learn how stories fit into a discovery process that you’ll use to better understand the challenges of your customers and users, imagine solutions, and continuously learn if you’re building things they truly value.


Speakers
avatar for Jeff Patton

Jeff Patton

Chief Troublemaker, Jeff Patton & Associates
Jeff makes use of over 20 years of product design and development experience to help companies create great products.Jeff started in software development in the early 90s as a project leader and senior developer for a small software product company. There he learned that well written code, and fast delivery isnt the secret to success, its just table stakes. Its actually deep understanding of your customers and users coupled with a desire to... Read More →


Tuesday August 6, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Delta B

10:45am

Coaching For Win-Win Outcomes with Win-Win Conversations (Declan Whelan, Ola Ellnestam)
Limited Capacity filling up

As a coach you may have heard something like *Release the outcome!*. In other words, as a coach you should distance yourself from project outcomes. Instead you *should* focus on helping others visualize and achieve outcomes that are important to *them*. But what if you are a ScrumMaster, manager, executive or in a similar position, where you have a vested interest in the outcome? How do you coach effectively with such a bias?

With win-win conversations you build mutual trust and respect while striving for win-win outcomes. You will unleash hidden latent ‘intelligent energy’ in yourself and others leading to sustainable high performance on your teams.

In this session you will learn the art of the ‘win-win conversation’ through hands-on practice. You will apply the model by having conversations on specific situations leading to fresh new insights into challenges you are facing right now. You can even take the techniques you learn home with you to improve conversations with your spouse, children and friends!

Speakers
avatar for Ola Ellnestam

Ola Ellnestam

Agical
Ola is a coach and mentor for both business and technical teams. He loves to combine technology, people and business, which is why he finds software development so interesting. He has developed complex computer systems within health care, defense and online banking and he knows that software must be easy to use, extend and deploy in order to be worth developing.
avatar for Declan Whelan

Declan Whelan

Leanintuit
Helping organizations improve value steams and their organizational structure.


Tuesday August 6, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Canal A

10:45am

Producing Product Developers (david hussman)
Limited Capacity seats available

Beyond Scrum Masters and Software Engineers lies the land of Product Developers. Product developers have the skills to produce and the tenacity to ensure their product is meaningful. So how do you do produce product developers, and what coaching tools can you take back to your company that you can immediately apply?

This session applies years of coaching experience to teach tools for producing teams who produce. The context is your team and your product. The format will challenged you to examine how you work today and how you can coach your team toward product development and product learning. The tools will be tangible, applicable and concrete.

Starting from product ideation and team formation and going well into product delivery and product learning, the session will cover a wide range of material. Your only preparation is a list of questions you want answered and an open mind ready to think, critique and absorb.

Speakers
avatar for David Hussman

David Hussman

Founder, DevJam
I split my time between leading DevJam and coaching at client sites. My coaching ranges from small teams to large enterprises and entails working with teams, programs and leadership groups. Some days I am doing discovery work, teaching product thinking and agile design and augmenting real agility with user centered design and user experience tools. Other days I am deep in the delivery space helping teams adapt agile methods to meet their needs... Read More →


Tuesday August 6, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Delta D

10:45am

Changing Cultural DNA with Spiral Dynamics to become thoroughly Agile (Dajo Breddels)
Limited Capacity seats available

Your Agile Coach leaves ... How to prevent your company from going back to old behavior? A lot of organizations are struggling with this question. This is mainly, because it’s much harder to implement an Agile mind-set than its to tell people about processes, artifacts and events. This mind-set is a system of specific values. Spiral Dynamics is about value systems and provides tools how to assess and change them. During this session you will learn how to discover the dominant values in organizations and how to transform them using the natural flow of value system evolution.

At the end of this session you will have a list of concrete steps and actions to change the values of your organization to the desired value system.

Speakers
avatar for Dajo Breddels

Dajo Breddels

Coach, Dajo Breddels Coaching
Dajo Breddels, Agile Coach with a big interest in developing new playful and creative ways to give insights and help in cultural transformation.


Tuesday August 6, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Bayou D

10:45am

Cultural transformation of a large organization - experiences from Ericsson (Hendrik Esser)
Limited Capacity seats available

Many agile transitions begin with the adoption of agile practices. That is relatively straight-forward as often the starting point is a sort of command and control culture making learning of new processes easy. However, for a sustainable agile transformation, culture is a key aspect. Unfortunately, culture is difficult to change. It affects everybody in the company: the engineers, the leaders and managers as well as the executives. It can’t be switched from one day to the next and you need to start from where you are.

In this presentation I will share learnings and experiences coming from 4 years of agile transformation of a 2000 people organization within Ericsson. I will talk about what motivates cultural change, what we want to achieve with it, how it can be planned and kicked off, how we can manage the many challenges arising from such a change and what great steps forward can be experienced if things go right.
The challenges comprise things like, for example: how we can lead and manage the very high expectations on leaders (how can leaders lead by example if they are themselves in a transformation?), how we can establish true collaboration between people and teams, crossing organizational borders and handling friction between units that are doing an agile transition and units that don’t (yet). Doing this I will share a number of real-life stories illustrating what can happen and how one we dealt with it.
Based on our experiences, I will suggest general concepts and approaches, that can help your organization progressing on the way through your agile transformation.

Speakers
avatar for Hendrik Esser

Hendrik Esser

VP, Operations and Programs, Ericsson
Growing up in the 1980s, Hendrik was passionate computer game developer and active in a computer club giving programming lessons. After getting his diploma in Electrical engineering he started at Ericsson as a SW developer and grew into technical coordination and System Development roles. A broad interest in people and management of large organizations brought him into management roles, starting as a project manager, later heading Systems- and... Read More →


Tuesday August 6, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Governors C

10:45am

Simple sketches for diagramming your software architecture (Simon Brown)
Limited Capacity seats available

Agility is about moving fast and this requires good communication. A consistent, shared vision is essential in order for teams to push in the same direction, but it's surprising that many agile teams struggle to effectively communicate the architecture of the software they are building. As an industry we do have the Unified Modeling Language (UML), yet many people favour informal boxes and lines sketches instead. The problem is that such diagrams rarely make any sense, usually need a narrative to accompany them and ultimately slow the team down. Although we can argue whether UML offers an effective way to communicate software architecture, that's often irrelevant because many teams have already thrown out UML or simply don't know it. Abandoning UML is one thing but, in the race for agility, many software development teams have lost the ability to communicate visually.

This session is aimed at everybody involved in the software development process and is about improving architectural communication in an agile environment. You'll see some patterns and anti-patterns related to NoUML diagrams and you'll learn some simple techniques for communicating software architecture using informal sketches.

Simon regularly gives software architecture classes around Europe and this topic is a core part of his workshops.

Speakers

Tuesday August 6, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Canal E

10:45am

Using Pair Programming for Coaching & Mentoring (Angela Harms, Jason Felice)
Limited Capacity seats available

Jerry Weinberg says no matter what the problem is, it's always a people problem. This is especially true for pairing. You can have a perfect CI setup, big monitiors, extra keyboards, and fast tests, but this won't fix the most interesting pairing challenges. (Like when you wonder what to say when your pair is hunched over the keyboard, or when you know that your pair is lost, but it's easier not to bring it up...) When you're in the coaching role, learn what you can do to overcome the barriers and create real pairing flow.

Speakers
avatar for Jason Felice

Jason Felice

Developer, Groupon


Tuesday August 6, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Bayou B

10:45am

So You Want to Do a Startup! (Abby Fichtner)
Limited Capacity seats available

So, you've got a big idea and want to do a startup. Awesome! Where will you start? There's no gathering customer requirements - this isn't a custom dev shop. Nor can you just go off & start building -- 9 out of 10 new products fail and *if you build it, they will come* is not the path to success.

Right! There's that whole Lean Startup methodology, but where do you start *with that*? In this interactive talk, I'll take a very pragmatic approach to helping ensure you're building a **viable business** out of your vision as you work up to your first product release. And we'll have fun with it, splitting up into startup teams and trying the ideas out in real-time during the session.

For the talk, I'll introduce the milestones that an early stage startup should strive for, and show you how to create Minimum Viable Products (MVPs) to drive towards these milestones.

I'll walk through a number of MVPs that you can build -- starting from things that require no software at all (customer interviews, concierge services) through to things you can quickly pull together with little to no code (landing pages, technology mashups). Evolving up to how to decide what to build in your first product release. And I'll include examples of how real startups are using each of these.

--
As Co-Organizer for Boston's Lean Startup Circle (3rd largest Lean Startup Circle in the world with almost 3,000 members), I'm a huge advocate for Lean Startup. As with any methodology - it's sometimes hard to know how to apply theory to practice. This talk will be based on what I've seen work (and not work!) amongst the hundreds of early stage startups that I've worked with.

Speakers
avatar for Abby Fichtner

Abby Fichtner

Hacker in Residence, Harvard Innovation Lab
Hacker Chick ~ Startup Guardian Angel ~ awesomely eclectic crazy child


Tuesday August 6, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Bayou E

10:45am

Agile at scale at Spotify (Joakim Sundén, Anders Ivarsson)
Limited Capacity filling up

In a few years Spotify has grown from a small startup in Sweden to a pretty big company with more than 30 engineering teams in four different development offices on two different continents. And we have no intention of slowing down. Such rapid growth carries big challenges. How can we continue to improve our product at great speed, while growing the number of users, employees and supported platforms and devices? How do we stay lean and agile when we grow from a small startup to a big corporation? In this talk we will present how Spotify is addressing these challenges. We will talk about autonomous squads, tribes, retrospective gatherings, guilds, hack weeks, system owner days, and a lot of other ideas we’re experimenting with.

Speakers
avatar for Anders Ivarsson

Anders Ivarsson

Agile Coach, Spotify
avatar for Joakim Sundén

Joakim Sundén

Agile Coach, Spotify


Tuesday August 6, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Canal C/D

10:45am

10:45am

Black Swan Farming using Cost of Delay: Discover, nurture and speed up delivery of value (Joshua Arnold, Ozlem Yuce)
Limited Capacity seats available

Most organisations don't suffer from a lack of innovative ideas, they suffer from not being able to pick the best of what turns out to be a bad bunch. Thanks to the consumerization of IT and software eating the world this is getting worse. Innovation and software development is already synonymous in most organizations. As Jack Welch says: If you are not moving at the speed of the marketplace you're already dead – you just haven't stopped breathing yet.

So how do we improve the way we prioritise to ensure that we're delivering value quickly and not wasting our precious capacity to innovate? Since economics is all about scarcity, we can turn to economics to help us quickly discover, nurture and speed up the delivery of value. This session examines how a Fortune 500 company used Cost of Delay across a $100m portfolio to:

  1. 1. Improve Prioritisation – by using CD3 (Cost of Delay Divided by Duration)

  2. 2. Improve Decision-making – by making the economic trade-offs visible

  3. 3. Change the Focus – from efficiency and cost to speed and value



The talk concludes with before and after results and a retrospective: what worked well, what we would do differently, what we learned and what still puzzles us.

Speakers
avatar for Joshua Arnold

Joshua Arnold

Engineer, blackswanfarming.com
With a background in fluid mechanics and systems engineering, Joshua has worked for the past decade with various organisations to improve their systems of innovation and delivery. In particular, Joshua has focused on the problem of prioritisation and portfolio management, helping to bring the fuzzy-front-end of development into focus and aligned toward faster time-to-market and improved return on investment. | | He recently co-authored an... Read More →
avatar for Ozlem Yuce

Ozlem Yuce

Agile Transformation Lead, Maersk Line
https://twitter.com/OzzieYuce


Tuesday August 6, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Canal B

10:45am

Failing Well (Jabe Bloom)
Limited Capacity seats available

There is a trap hidden inside Lean Startup's CustDev cycle. If entrepreneurs want to be successful, they have to be passionate about their ideas. They need to understand more about their customers than anyone else. I’ve spent the last year lecturing to and teaching entrepreneurs and I've observed that their passion for their idea and their belief that they already DO know everything about their customers can prevent them from actually LEARNING what they need to know in order to create as successful business. The same passion and positive psychology required to succeed in the face of uncertainty is hindering them from learning fast enough to survive.

How can we take our passion, our vision, a couple “wild ass guesses”, and produce meaningful, validated learning?

# Stand back... we are going to try science.

The question of how to learn as an organization and how to DEMONSTRATE learning has been explored by philosophers of science and by business theorists for years. What can the Lean Startup Community learn about creating scientifically valid experiments that create actionable knowledge?

This session will explore the theoretical relationships between scientific hypotheses and scientific experiments. We will explore the theory behind using effective questions to invalidate assumptions and following through with the learning process after an error in the hypothesis is detected. We’ll learn how to detect hypothesis and questions that can’t be falsified and therefore only lead to vanity validation not learning.

We’ll learn how to fail well and fail faster by keeping our passion focused on the vision and our dispassionate logic focused on the assumptions.

Speakers
avatar for Jabe Bloom

Jabe Bloom

President & Principle Consultant, Coherent Insight
I try to collect and tell interesting stories about the future. | | Sometimes, when the stories are are compelling enough, people use them to make interesting things. | | I am an award-winning international speaker on Lean Software and Product Development, Agile, and Lean Management. | | President and Principal Consultant at Coherent Insight, Chief Flow Officer at Praxis Flow | | Pursuing a PhD at Carnegie Mellon.


Tuesday August 6, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Governors D

10:45am

Play the getKanban Board Game with the Inventor (Russell Healy)
Limited Capacity full

How would you like to experience Kanban for yourself? Try playing the game! In this session we will play the latest version of the popular getKanban Board Game, facilitated by the guy who made it! Rather than hearing theory, you will actually see how a Kanban system works. You will feel the tension as you make trade-offs between utilization and cost-of-delay. You'll see how classes of service work, and what they're good for. You'll collect metrics and construct your own Cumulative Flow Diagram, Control Chart, and Lead Time Distribution Chart. As a result you will come away with a deep, intuitive understanding of Kanban, and best of all, you'll have a great time!


Speakers

Tuesday August 6, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Bayou A

10:45am

Visual Management: Beyond Burndown to Portfolio and Enterprise Walls (Bob Payne, Cameron Wolff, George Dinwiddie)
Limited Capacity filling up

Visual Management has long been a key part of agile and lean. This talk will explore real world examples of visual management systems and discuss the hidden power of visualization and transparency in an enterprise setting. Participants in this interactive workshop will work with examples of team, portfolio and enterprise management walls to understand how the walls create context for real management and design/prototype an improvement for the example boards.

Many organizations talk about driving change through transparency and an empowered, informed workforce. A picture can say a thousand words, we will highlight examples of enterprises that have stopped telling and started showing. An agile team is but a piece of a larger value stream. By embedding the team’s visual management system in the context of the Portfolio and Enterprise Wall, the team has the context of what is coming, how it ties to corporate goals and the impact of the working software delivered.

Own the board and let the information do the talking.

Speakers
avatar for George Dinwiddie

George Dinwiddie

Software Development Coach, iDIA Computing
George Dinwiddie helps organizations develop software more effectively. He brings thirty-five years of development experience from electronic hardware and embedded firmware to business information technology. He helps organizations, managers, and teams solve the problems they face by providing consulting, coaching, mentoring and training at the organizational, process, team, interpersonal, and technical levels. Involved in the Agile community... Read More →
avatar for Bob Payne

Bob Payne

VP Consulting Services, LitheSpeed
An early adopter of Extreme Programming, Scrum and SAFe, Bob has worked exclusively as a Lean+Agile Transformation leader since 1999.   | | Bob hosts the Agile Toolkit podcast and has produced over 170 podcasts, recording a variety of industry leaders and Agile practitioners. His consulting and training style is build on years of Lean+Agile experience, a MSEE in Computer Architectures for Artificial Intelligence and having grown up... Read More →
avatar for Cameron Wolff

Cameron Wolff

Agile Whisperer, Cardinal Health - Fuse
Long time advocate of agile management and development practices. Believe leadership is responsible for setting the culture that feeds agile transformations. | | Author of the agileandleanatscale.com blog. Led transformations at Cardinal Health - Fuse, Virtual Hold Technology and Nationwide Insurance. | | Learned leadership skills at Qwest (now CenturyLink Communications) and software development at AT&T Bell Laboratories... Read More →


Tuesday August 6, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Governors A

11:30am

Agile Testing: A Systematic Mapping Across Three Conferences (Theodore D. Hellmann, Apoorve Chokshi, Zahra Shakeri, Sydney Pratte, and Frank Maurer)
Limited Capacity full

Unit and acceptance testing are central to agile software development, but is that all there is to agile testing? We build on previous work to provide a systematic mapping of agile testing publications at major agile conferences. The analysis presented in this paper allows us to answer research questions like: what is agile testing used for; what types of studies on agile testing have been published; what problems do people have when performing agile testing; and what benefits do these publications offer? We additionally explore topics such as: who are the major authors in this field; in which countries do these authors work; what tools are mentioned; and is the field driven by academics, practitioners, or collaborations? This paper presents our analysis of these topics in order to better structure future work in the field of agile testing and to provide a better understanding of what this field actually entails. 


Speakers
avatar for Theodore D. Hellmann

Theodore D. Hellmann

PhD Student / Sessional Instructor, University of Calgary
I'm a PhD student under the supervision of Frank Maurer at the University of Calgary. My research interests include automated GUI testing, low-fidelity prototyping, test maintenance, and test-driven development. | | I've recently got into teaching as a sessional instructor here and I think it's great! If you have any advice for / stories about teaching agile methodologies, I'd love to hear about it so please get in touch with me!


Tuesday August 6, 2013 11:30am - 12:00am
Presidential Boardroom

2:00pm

Ten Lessons Learned from Integrating Interaction Design and Agile Development (Tiago Silva Da Silva, Milene Silveira, and Frank Maurer)
Limited Capacity seats available

Agile development have a distinct culture that at first glance seems to conflict with Interaction Design. Therefore, integrating these two areas becomes a challenging task. There is little guidance about integrating them. Very limited empirical evidence exists on agile development and interaction design being combined in practice. In order to better understand how these approaches are combined in practice, a multiple-case study of agile teams working with interaction designers was performed. In the paper, we present a set of ten lessons learned from these studies.


Speakers
avatar for Tiago Silva Da Silva

Tiago Silva Da Silva

Profesor, ICT-UNIFESP
Agile UX Researcher


Tuesday August 6, 2013 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Presidential Boardroom

2:00pm

Agile Leadership & Roles (James Newkirk)
Limited Capacity seats available

Empowering the team requires a very different approach to leadership. An empowered team has the authority and responsibility to make decisions, rather than needing to approval or instructions from a manager. The team itself self-organizes around a leader instead of reporting to a manager. This session will describe a number of leadership styles and how these apply to the various roles people play on an agile team.


Speakers
avatar for James Newkirk

James Newkirk

VP of Service Engineering, CenturyLink Cloud
As Tier 3's vice president of engineering, James oversees the development of Tier 3's cloud management platform. He brings almost 30 years experience in the software industry. Prior to Tier 3, James held senior leadership roles at Microsoft, Caradigm (GE/Microsoft Joint Venture) and ThoughtWorks. Earlier in his career he co-founded Object Mentor Inc with Robert C. Martin, a consulting firm that specialized in training and mentoring their... Read More →


Tuesday August 6, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Delta B

2:00pm

Active Listening for Agile Coaches (Chris Sims)
Limited Capacity full

When people are talking to you, are you really listening, or are you starting to think about what you’re going to say next? Even if you hear their words, are you sure that you understand their intended meaning? In this exercise-driven workshop we learn to employ Active Listening techniques to improve interpersonal communication, with particular attention to how active listening techniques can help an agile coach succeed.


Speakers
avatar for Chris Sims

Chris Sims

Agile Coach and Certified Scrum Trainer, Agile Learning Labs
Chris Sims is a Certified Scrum Trainer, agile coach, and recovering C++ developer who helps software development teams improve their productivity and happiness. Chris is the founder of Agile Learning Labs and co-author of two best-selling scrum books: The Elements of Scrum and Scrum: a Breathtakingly Brief and Agile Introduction.


Tuesday August 6, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Bayou C

2:00pm

Lightning Talks - People

Moderators
avatar for Michael Sahota

Michael Sahota

Guide & Certified Enterprise Coach, Agilitrix (Independent Consultant)
I believe people deliver astounding results when they have Passion and Purpose. Joy and Meaning. Creativity, Safety, Trust and Belonging. I believe we can foster work environments where people can grow and evolve to unleash their best every day. | | I help people cultivate their organizational culture. To invite a more conscious way of being and relating. To evolve organizational structures and practices that foster new ways of working... Read More →

Tuesday August 6, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Canal C/D

2:00pm

The Seven Pillars Of Collaboration - Why agile teams need HISTORY in order to collaborate (Geoff Watts)
Limited Capacity filling up

All men dream; but not equally - T.E. Lawrence (Lawrence of Arabia) in the Seven Pillars of Wisdom

Perhaps the equivalent of that quote would be...All teams collaborate: but not equally 

The theory states that collaborative teams are a desirable by-product of agile. In my experience, however, they are often a necessity and all teams have the potential to collaborate well. Yet not all teams do collaborate well so how do you turn a group of individuals into a creative, collaborative team? Are there any patterns that we can follow to help us increase our teams' collaboration?

This session will introduce you to a memorable model - HISTORY - that has been drawn from patterns observed in some of the most successful and collaborative agile teams I have seen that explain the foundational characteristics required for collaboration to exist and grow and will let you experience short, practical and easy-to-implement techniques that you can use with your team(s) to increase their collaboration.

Speakers
avatar for Geoff  Watts

Geoff Watts

Director & Coach, Inspect & Adapt
I am the author of Scrum Mastery: From Good to Great Servant-Leadership and passionate about helping develop great ScrumMasters who, in turn, make great agile organisations. | | I love coaching talented individuals who are looking to develop themselves and make a change at work and helping organisations develop a coaching culture and become more agile.


Tuesday August 6, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Bayou B

2:00pm

Continuous Architecture & Emergence Design (Scott Ambler)
Limited Capacity filling up

A common question that people new to agile often have is how do agile teams address architecture? Sadly, some people will claim that agile teams don't address architecture at all, yet nothing could be further from the truth. Architecture is an important aspect of any software-based solution regardless of development paradigm. Agilists take architecture so seriously that we work on it every single day and we safely evolve the architecture in a continuous manner throughout a project.

There are several key aspects to continuous architecture. Disciplined agile teams will perform architecture envisioning at the beginning of a project to ensure that they get going in the right direction. They will prove the architecture with working code early in construction so that they know their strategy is viable, evolving appropriately based on their learnings. They will explore new or complex technologies with small architecture spikes. They will explore the details of the architecture on a just-in-time (JIT) basis throughout construction, doing JIT modeling as they go and ideally taking a test-driven-development (TDD) approach at the design level.

This presentation describes how these techniques fit into your development lifecycle, the advantages and disadvantages of each one, and via examples how to tailor your approach to reflect the scaling factors that you face.

Speakers

Tuesday August 6, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Governors C

2:00pm

Leading Agile Engineering: Helping Your Team Improve Its Ability to Ship Software (Arlo Belshee, James Shore)
Limited Capacity seats available

You're leading a team as it becomes agile. You've got the planning process under control. You're realizing the benefits of improved transparency and your teams are communicating better with the customer. But you know that many of the key advantages - faster release cadence, improved quality, reduced cost of change - come from changing the core development activity.

Some of these changes, such as basic TDD, are obvious. But even they can be difficult to measure. Beyond the basics, the technical practices become difficult even to describe. Your teams give you transparency into what they do. How can you get similar transparency into how they do it? What should you realistically expect a team to do, and how can you tell whether it is doing that?

This talk targets managers and executives for agile teams. We discuss helping people see what is possible, creating feedback systems so that everyone knows where they are at, and ways to choose practices that align with your business needs.

Speakers
avatar for Arlo Belshee

Arlo Belshee

Sr. Program Mgr, Microsoft
Arlo helps you change cultures in large organizations. He transitions hundreds or thousands of people at a time to full technical and cultural prowess in a way that sticks. | | More importantly, Arlo gives your company the ability to change its own culture. He seeks to be the last consultant you will ever need to hire. After 6 months, you should be able to adapt your culture, practices, and company structures to meet novel challenges, each... Read More →
avatar for James Shore

James Shore

James Shore teaches, writes, and consults on Agile development processes. He led his first Agile team in 1999 and was an early adopter of Extreme Programming in 2000. Today, he focuses on helping people understand how all aspects of Agile, from technical, to business, to social, fit together to create successful software projects. | | James is an inaugural recipient of the Agile Alliance's Gordon Pask Award for Contributions to Agile... Read More →


Tuesday August 6, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Governors D

2:00pm

Agile In The Real World: Gone Mainstream, Creating Bigger Waves, Making Course Corrections (Tom Grant)
Limited Capacity seats available

As part of its ongoing collection of data about software development and delivery, Forrester Research has been tracking the state and trajectory of Agile adoption. Agile is clearly a mainstream methodology at this point, but that's only the first part of a much longer story about Agile in practice. This session will cover the state of Agile adoption, as seen through Forrester's collection of survey and interview data. A sample of the questions we'll cover includes...

* How far has Agile adoption spread?
* How are teams juggling Agile and other demands?
* Which presumed threats to Agile adoption (distributed development, compliance, etc.) are real, and which might be overrated?
* Which works better, incremental adoption or big bang?
* Is the common mix of Waterfall and Agile (Water-Scrum-Fall) a cause for concern?
* Is anyone getting Agile to work with outsourcing partners?
* How are Agile and Lean working together these days?
* Whose roles and responsibilities are changing the most?
* Is Agile demonstrating value in other ways than speed?

Speakers

Tuesday August 6, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Canal A

2:00pm

Be Agile. Scale Up. Stay Lean. (Dean Leffingwell)
Limited Capacity seats available

Scrum, XP, Kanban and related methods have been proven to provide step changes in productivity and quality for software teams. However, these methods do not have the native constructs necessary to scale to the enterprise. What the industry desperately needs is a solution that moves from a set of simplistic, disparate, development-centric methods, to a scalable, unified approach that addresses the complex constructs and additional stakeholders in the organization—and enables realization of enterprise-class product or service initiatives via aligned and cooperative solution development.

In this tutorial, Dean Leffingwell describes how to accomplish this with the Scaled Agile Framework, a publicly–accessible knowledge base of proven Lean and Agile practices for enterprise-class software development. He approaches the problem from the perspectives of Lean thinking and principles of product development flow, illustrating how these core principles help deliver business results at scale, while keeping the development system—and the enterprise—lean and able to responsive rapidly to changing market needs.

Speakers
avatar for Dean Leffingwell

Dean Leffingwell

President, Leffingwell, LLC.


Tuesday August 6, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Delta D

2:00pm

Need 4 Speed: Leverage new metrics to boost your velocity without compromising on quality (Raziel Tabib)
Limited Capacity full

In today’s reality we cannot afford any fat or unnecessary delays in our time to market neither afford any compromise on quality. Agile is no longer luxury but a necessity. However, agile has to evolve. It has been more than 10 years since the agile manifesto published. Enough time to revisit some of the practices, refine, enhance, and identify gaps.
In this session we will visit some of successful practices we have learned after 6 years of practicing agile ourselves in a fairly large distributed organization as well as practices we have learn from our mature customers who manage to exercise continuous delivery on their mission critical application while staying on top of quality and risks .
Few examples of these practices: how we can further understand teams velocity beyond a single number, how we can improve velocity? How we can stay on top of changes and better assess risks? How to leverage application lifecycle intelligence to achieve better alignment of agile teams efforts with business priorities, decrease MTTR, facilitate collaboration and much more.
more than 10 years after, many best practices have been gathered, come learn about the practices helped us taking our agile to the next level.

Speakers
avatar for Raziel Tabib

Raziel Tabib

Director of Products at HP Software, Hewlett-Packard


Tuesday August 6, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Canal B

2:00pm

Lean Leadership - How to change as a manager from expert to coach (Ed Kraay)
Limited Capacity full

While 67% of the initial champions for enterprise agile adoption are at the top, the most cited obstacle to further adoption is lack of management support. [1] And yet, most change efforts tend to focus on the teams, rather than management. When support is offered, it is typically not more than listing a few do's and don'ts in an agile training class.

This, combined with the tendency for managers to be promoted because they are excellent at technical work, rather than people skills, make paying attention to managers all the more important.

In a company wide Lean Transformation, Dan Bos, operations manager for Herman Miller who has been applying lean thinking since 2001 said Lean tools can be taught to anybody. We know now that the soft skills are the critical part of this whole process.[2] Lean Manufacturing, while different from agile software development, is very similar from the perspective of the magnitude of behavior and thinking changes required.

In this session, we will make the case that for agile change to be successful, we need to move management from the role of the expert who solves problems for teams to the role of coach, who develops her team's best thinking. We will use Mike Rother's Toyota Kata model to explain how Toyota develops managers from experts to coaches. I will then provide some specific Yahoo! examples of how we have taught coaching skills and the results.

And while knowing what to change is helpful, it doesn't provide the specific guidance that you need in order to make coaching a habit. So we will guide you through a workshop to come up with a specific change plan that makes sense in your environment to sustain the change. You will identify key behaviors you need to change in order to be a coach, instead of an expert. You with then apply Joseph Grenny's proven model for analyzing the six sources of influence, to sustain your new behavior. You can also use this model to mentor others in your organization to do the same.

Audience

* People managers in software d

Speakers
avatar for Ed Kraay

Ed Kraay

Technical Project/Program Mgr, Yahoo!
Ed has been at Yahoo for 3 years. His first job was a coach moving 1000 people all-in to modern software methods. He then worked to spread agile methods across Yahoo as a whole. He now works as a Program Lead for a large strategic project. Prior to Yahoo Ed was an coach for ThoughtWorks and SolutionsIQ


Tuesday August 6, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Bayou D

2:00pm

Hacking Agile with Users - The User Driven Development process (Alline Watkins)
Limited Capacity seats available

How to improve Agile Development?
Where are the users on the Agile Development Manifesto?
How is Agile related to Lean?
How users can help avoiding waste?

or even more:
How can everyone become involved in the customer research process?
How can you use UX to drive innovation within large enterprises?

These and other questions are going to be discussed on this talk that was created after years of experience working for enterprises and startups together. How they can learn from each other? That is what Alline Watkins found about Lean Startup and Agile Development.

In this talk the presenter will show the User Driven Development Process in details and how this process can improve Agile Development. The UDD process was invented by Alline Watkins while working at a 100% Scrum project at Nike Inc. and put together in the blog below:
http://UserDrivenDev.com

Speakers

Tuesday August 6, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Bayou A

2:00pm

Discovery Curves: The Organization's Ability To Learn And Deliver (Cesar Idrovo Carrillo)
Limited Capacity seats available

Software development is mostly not about software development, and our corporate audiences are telling us that in most cases it is only between 10-30% about software development. At least 70% is about learning.

This workshop introduces the concept and application of the Discovery Curves model to help chart your team or your organization's ability to learn, so you can link it to its ability to deliver. This model can also help frame Agile for your management team and help everyone stop pretending that we can learn by sheer force of planning. A team's own ability to learn directly supports its ability to deliver.

The session also shares some of the symptoms that might indicate discovery blind spots, as well as some strategies to address them.

Symptoms:

1. Warning Sign Wear
2. Knowledge Value
3. Data Congestion
4. Cracks, Gaps & Breaches
5. Talent Detractors
6. Specialist Attrition
7. Not My Problem
8. Historic Success
9. Malicious Cooperation

Strategies:

1. Own the Outcome
2. (Re)Activate Learning
3. Liberate Information
4. Bust the Silos
5. Celebrate Legacy
6. Reward Legacy
7. Redefine Roles
8. Protect Innovation
9. Fix the Milk!


Tuesday August 6, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Bayou E

2:00pm

Agile + Branding, Sitting in a Tree (Paul Hart)
Limited Capacity seats available

Many people think of branding as logos and colors. But, there's more to this branding thing than you may realize. *Every encounter a customer has with your product is a brand impression*. Understanding and applying brand will always make your product more successful.

Maybe you've noticed brand and marketing managers don't seem to get Agile. Perhaps you view branding as an annoying, superficial requirement pushed on you by managers who don't understand rapid development.

I'm a design craftsman with a marketing background working at an Agile shop. In agile software development, my observation has been that the full benefits of branding are often not considered and sometimes even ignored. From my experience as a designer in an agile world, I can assure you brands can *AND* do actually benefit from the agile process.

I'll be sharing three real-world product stories that illustrate how agile development works with brand:

* **A mom and pop startup** - How we discovered and built the right brand for the product, embracing change along the way.
* **A stand-alone application for an existing brand** - How we iterated and evolved the brand as we continually tested it with real customers.
* **A data-driven application for a large regional company** - How we worked with the organization's marketing management team to push the brand into new territory with a digital product.

You'll see how I applied brands through iterating, listening to customers, working with business people, attention to good design, reflection, simplicity and embracing changing requirements.

A company's brand — and how it's applied — is *THE* differentiating factor in products. As developers, designers and product managers, let's work together to make the most of it in our applications.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Hart

Paul Hart

Designer, Atomic Object


Tuesday August 6, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Canal E

2:00pm

Super duper fast domain modelling. (Chris Matts, Jeffrey Davidson)
Limited Capacity seats available

Many IT projects are unintentionally disrespectful to the customer. They ask the customer to define inputs or process or calculations when all the customer should do is specify the output that will deliver them value. There is a disturbing fashion within Agile to take a UX approach where the user sketches out the input screens they need and the UX designer creates a low fidelity prototype that looks pretty in powerpoint or visio. Whilst this highly interactive approach is very appealing and satisfying approach for the UX person, it is disrespectful of the customer's time and it is fundamentally wrong as an approach. This approach has lead to failed projects.

But if the customer doesn't tell you the inputs, processes and calculations, who will?

The solution is Domain Modelling, or Business Analysis as it is also known, is a very unfashionable topic within the Agile community. Some authors appreciate the value of domain modelling but dare not speak its name. They refer to Knowledge crunching or Gathering Up-Front Knowledge. Domain modelling is a very valuable technique but it traditionally has a number of drawbacks. First, it can take a long long time, so long in fact that it undermines the value it delivers. Second, it is prone to analysis paralysis where it thrashes around unsure of which direction to take and is not sure when it is finished. Third, domain modelling produces a model rather than examples which is what we need to drive an Agile development.

This workshop will show a technique that addresses these issues. A super duper fast analysis technique that has a very clear start and end point, generating a model AND examples. The approach, which does not have a name, is based on knowledge smells.

Workshop mechanics:

The session will start at the point where the customer has identified the value that they want to achieve and their requirements (An output report).

Step 1 (20 Minutes). The knowledge smells will be introduced by way of an interactive worked example. This will sho

Speakers
avatar for Jeffrey Davidson

Jeffrey Davidson

Principal, Leading Great Teams
Jeffrey Davidson helps teams uncover their greatness. It’s there already, but too often hiding. Using a combination of stories, engagement, and activities, Jeffrey lays the groundwork for lasting change in leaders and teams; building models of execution and cooperation, guiding world-class teams into the #futureofwork.


Tuesday August 6, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Governors A

2:45pm

Analyzing Effectiveness Of Workshops For Learning Agile Development. (Shota Suzuki and Hironori Washizaki)
Limited Capacity seats available

Workshops are effective in learning the human and social factors of software engineering [1]. However, their effectiveness in learning agile development in particular has not yet been determined, despite the fact that numerous agile development workshops have been held over the years. In this paper, we analyze the effectiveness of agile development workshops through an experiment, and show that the workshops are indeed effective at learning agile development. Self-study is another commonly used method to learn something new. Therefore, we compare the effectiveness of workshops with that of self-study to better illustrate the effectiveness of agile development workshops. In our experiment, we examine 7 workshop subjects and 8 self-study subjects, and compare their scores on the Agile mind check, which is a method used to measure their degree of mastery of agile development. As a result, we demonstrate the effectiveness of agile development workshops, especially those that simulate actual experiences. We also show that workshops are more effective than self-study.

 


Speakers
avatar for Shota Suzuki

Shota Suzuki

Student, Waseda University
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering, Waseda University,
avatar for Hironori Washizaki

Hironori Washizaki

Associate Professor, Waseda University
Hironori Washizaki is a head and associate professor at Global Software Engineering Laboratory, Waseda University, Japan. He also works at National Institute of Informatics as a visiting associate professor. He obtained his Doctor’s degree in Information and Computer Science from Waseda University in 2003. His research interests include software modeling, product line, and quality assurance. He has published more than 50 research papers in... Read More →


Tuesday August 6, 2013 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Presidential Boardroom

3:45pm

System Dynamics Modeling Of Agile Continuous Delivery Process (Olumide Akerele)
Limited Capacity seats available

The popularization of agile development as well as the recent prevalence of virtualization and cloud computing has revolutionized the software delivery process- making it faster and affordable for businesses to release their software continuously. Hence, the need for a reliable and predictable delivery process for software applications. The aim of this PhD research work is to develop a System Dynamics (SD) model to achieve a repetitive, risk-free and effortless Continuous Delivery process to reduce the perils of delayed delivery, delivery cost overrun and poor quality delivered software.


Speakers
avatar for Olumide Akerele

Olumide Akerele

BA, parexel


Tuesday August 6, 2013 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Presidential Boardroom

3:45pm

Agile Quality & Risk Management (Elisabeth Hendrickson)
Limited Capacity seats available

Traditional approaches to quality and risk management involve quality gates, change control boards, feature freeze and code freeze milestones, and independent QA or Test groups. These approaches stabilize quality at by sacrificing agility. Yet buggy fragile code is even more dangerous for Agile teams where so much is changing so often. Quality and risk management are critically important for agility. This leads to the inevitable question: if the traditional approaches to quality and risk management don't work in an Agile context, what does?

Practices vary across organizations, but all successful teams emphasize the same underlying principles of fast feedback, high visibility, collaboration, and alignment. This talk examines various approaches Agile teams have taken to increase quality, mitigate risk, and ultimately ensure they are delivering the highest possible value for their stakeholders. Along the way you'll hear real world success stories and cautionary tales.


Speakers
avatar for Elisabeth  Hendrickson

Elisabeth Hendrickson

Director Quality Engineering, Cloud Foundry, Pivotal


Tuesday August 6, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Delta B

3:45pm

Agile Leader Storyline (Scott Dunn)
Limited Capacity filling up

If your life were summarized on a movie poster, what would it say?

We ask agile leaders and ScrumMasters to be Servant Leaders, Impediment removers, Coaches, Educators and evangelists, and Shepherds and guardians of the process (I use acrostic SLICES) as well as organizational change agents. Those are exciting aspects that go beyond our HR titles, but it's a tall order - how do we make that actionable, part of us? How do we weave these into a story? Our careers are not our stories. Our stories come from who we are and we are bigger than our jobs. If we are only what we do for a living, we are smaller than our potential, yet we can use this radical new role of agile leader or ScrumMaster as a means of connecting to, and leveraging at work, an opportunity to grow.

I have recently gone through a process known as storyline and begun using it in my training and coaching, and already seeing a difference and getting positive feedback.

Speakers

Tuesday August 6, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Bayou A

3:45pm

What do you value in your team? (Mark Kilby)
Limited Capacity seats available

Building high performance teams can sometimes feel like moving mountains or at least building bridges between mountains. When the team starts “storming” to high performance, different types of conflict arise. Some conflict is surmountable, but the greatest challenges are conflicts over values that can lead to heated debates, dysfunction, and collaboration collapsing. This workshop will help you discover those peak values for yourself, determine if you and your teammates are trying to reach the same peak values, or if you can at least build a bridge to link those peak values to maximize the team’s performance.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Kilby

Mark Kilby

coach, Sonatype
Agile mentor and co-active coach that has played many roles on the software and product lifecycle stage. Passions include coaching coaches, serving servant leaders and building sustainable organizations that truly bring value to the people served inside and outside the organization. Also, husband, father, volunteer, and many other roles in life.


Tuesday August 6, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Bayou D

3:45pm

devops all-star ask me anything fireside chat (Andrew Clay Shafer)
Limited Capacity seats available

With a devops track this year there will be a number of people attending the conference that have been involved in some aspect of devops for a number of years. (we won't know who exactly will be attending until we get speakers set and closer to the date).

I will pick 4-5 people with representative devops experience and lead them in an interactive discussion about their experiences with automation, operations, culture and process.

I will prepare questions and talking point to fill 75 minutes, but my hope is that we can get more guidance from the audience and I just need to get the conversation started.

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Clay Shafer

Andrew Clay Shafer

Clown Prince, Parvus Captus
we do what we can


Tuesday August 6, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Governors E

3:45pm

Agile By Numbers: KPI-Optimized Software Transformation for the Enterprise (Elena Yatzeck)
Limited Capacity seats available

How do you create meaningful change in a large enterprise? Are you able to address the right audiences and help them to do things better on their teams or in their chains of command? Do your teams sustain their progress? Are you challenged by getting enough executive attention, enough middle-management cooperation, and enough team member participation?

While there are no easy answers, proper choice and use of old-fashioned key performance indicators can become a powerful shared focal point for your organization's agile transformation efforts. While the other companies are getting lost in the debate over what is agile, or do you use a burn-up or a burn-down, and when, you are taking your own organization to new levels of efficiency by progressing towards an actual business goal rather than fixating on the fine points of the enabling techniques.

Learn how to think about large-scale agile change in simple, repeatable steps, based on techniques that work for governments, universities, fund-raising bodies, and corporate enterprises like yours. Learn how to structure, time, and message your change efforts. Find out how to engage external agile coaching contractors so that you are driving and they are helping, and not vice-versa. Learn to distinguish useful team metrics which an individual self-governing team might use to tune their own performance from program metrics, which show that in the aggregate, the agile projects are different from their waterfall counterparts, and whether that is a good thing or not.

Leave with a KPI toolkit you can apply immediately to your environment at home, and keep using until your transformation is self-sustaining.

Speakers
avatar for Elena Yatzeck

Elena Yatzeck

VP and Chief Agilist, Treasury Services, JPMorgan Chase
Agile, Japanese turn based RPGs, and the Napoleanic Wars.


Tuesday August 6, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Governors A

3:45pm

Continuous delivery? Easy! Just change everything. (Well, maybe it isn’t that easy) (Steve Stolt, Steve Neely)
Limited Capacity full

We moved from delivering releases every 8-weeks (Scrum), to delivering on-demand with (Kanban). We struggled with build systems, test systems, customer enablement, and internal communication. But we found light at the end of the tunnel -- greater control and flexibility over feature releases, incremental delivery of value, much lower risk, easier onboarding of new developers, less off-hours work, and a big uptick in confidence, with fewer changes at stake with each deployment.

Don’t miss the chance to learn from our mistakes and get your teams deploying more frequently. We will cover this topic from both the business (product management) and engineering perspectives.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Neely

Steve Neely

Research and Development, Rally Software
Steve Neely is a research and development engineer at Rally Software. His interests include: software craftsmanship, Agile techniques, continuous delivery, distributed systems, internet technologies, mobile and pervasive computing, informatics and data management, and semi-structured data. He likes to move fast and break things.
SS

Steve Stolt

I work at Rally Software as a product line manager for Rally ALM. I'm passionate about my family, friends and work. Conversations about Agile, Rally's products, or product management in general are always welcome. Reach out if you'd like to connect. Cheers.


Tuesday August 6, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Canal B

3:45pm

Board Level Agile, A CEO’s Perspective - Using Agile with my Executive Leadership Team (Simon Galbraith)
Limited Capacity full

Five years after scrum was introduced to Red Gate development teams, we’re still seeing value in continued investment in our agile & lean efforts. In fact, we’re now adopting these practices at the board level.

In this engaging session, Simon Galbraith, CEO of Red Gate Software, will share his agile & lean journey so far, describing the pains, the leaps of faith, the successes and the failures of Red Gate's adoption of agile practices, as well as the direction in which he's taking his team and where they're heading next.

Don’t worry - he’s not here to sell or market. This is about sharing the amazing experience of creating and sustaining an agile culture from start-up to mature organization.

If there’s sufficient interest, he’ll also offer an unique opportunity to engage with participants on the challenges and benefits of agile which he faces as CEO of a multinational organization.

(This part was written by Simon Cromarty, our Head of Project Management, after discussing it extensively with Simon)


Speakers
SG

Simon Galbraith

CEO, Red Gate Software
My interest in Agile is that I believe that in working out how to run software projects in a much better way the Agile movement also uncovered how all sorts of other human activities could be improved. I'm interested in pioneering Agile approaches to problems I have in running a medium sized company. | | Simon Galbraith is the co-founder and CEO of Red Gate Software. Over the past forteen years, together with co-founder and school friend... Read More →


Tuesday August 6, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Bayou B

3:45pm

A new era at IBM. Lean UX leading the way (Ariadna Font)
Limited Capacity seats available

Large companies tend to have strictly-enforced and heavy processes, which make them slow moving and generally a place where it is hard to innovate.
IBM has long been an engineer-led organization, where UX to engineer ratios are still be very low in some teams, and where UX best practices don't always see the light of day.
But IBM has just started to undergo the largest cultural shift in software history (400,000 people large!), it's the beginning of a new era at IBM, the era of Design Thinking, and it's led by the new General Manager of Design, Phil Gilbert (yes, you read it correctly, a GM of Design!) [1] [2].

In this talk, I'd like to share the key components of this amazing transformation that IBM is undergoing, with Lean UX and Design Thinking leading the way.
Design Thinking [3] encompasses the thoughtful design of any kind of user interaction and experience that user has with your system, from the installer (5 clicks instead of 20 would be nice), to the API and, naturally, the user interface.

At IBM, rather than trying to dictate great outcomes via specific processes, the IBM Design Thinking initiative introduces a framework that provides the freedom to act in a very lean and agile way. It proposes a new[4] way of thinking and advocates for clear conceptual models and decisions, including an MVP approach to scoping (Minimal Viable Product) with no more than 3 main business objectives per release, strong involvement of sponsor clients throughout the development cycle, shared product ownership by the Product Manager and the UX or Design lead, iterative approach to releases and regular demos to all stakeholders.

[1] http://redmonk.com/jgovernor/2013/01/07/on-the-importance-of-design-at-ibm-love-and-margins/

[2] http://blogs.forrester.com/clay_richardson/12-12-17-design_thinking_blurs_the_line_between_process_and_experience_design

[3] Wikipedia: As a style of thinking, design thinking is generally considered the ability to combine empathy for the context of a problem, creativity in the genera

Speakers
avatar for Ariadna Font

Ariadna Font

User Experience Lead and Manager, IBM
UX Lead and Development manager at IBM building the next generation of large-scale customer experience software. I have been spearheading and practicing Lean, Agile and UX methods at Vivisimo and now IBM with the ultimate goal to improve communication, gain shared understanding and increase happiness. I strive to empower others and work tirelessly to improve the way our growing Engineering team deliver and work together. I have a passion for... Read More →


Tuesday August 6, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Governors D

3:45pm

From Concept to Product Backlog (Gerard Meszaros)
Limited Capacity seats available

Many agile methodologies assume a customer (or product owner) walks into the room with a swack of money and a pile of story cards and tells the development team to start building the functionality described on the top few cards. Sometimes this works but often it doesn't. This session provides an overview of what needs to go on “behind the scenes” between when a project is conceived and when development can start in earnest. It identifies the activities that may need to be conducted, whether and when they should be conducted and who should be involved in those activities.

Speakers

Tuesday August 6, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Governors C

3:45pm

Making Scrum Stick in Regulated Industries (Laszlo Szalvay, Pat Reed)
Limited Capacity seats available

To become a mainstream methodology, Agile had to overcome many potential obstacles. The first was geography…One of today’s most daunting obstacles is compliance, often bringing heavyweight documentation, required procedures that are very waterfall-ish, complex approval work flows, and complicated approval processes begins Compliance Is A Hurdle, Not A Barrier, To Agile a Forrester Research paper published in July 2011.

This presentation will walk attendees through the problem of why organizations trying to manage a software development life cycle or PMO in a heavily regulated industry are fraught with challenges (e.g. externally mandated documentation levels, limiting the requirements and scope of the Product Owner, morale of employees). The presenters will discuss the fact that many of the external compliance standards (FASB, MAS, FSOC) are vague, and worse yet not written with the software development team in mind. In fact one of the risks is the interpretation of policy or external compliance standard remains on the business or with an executive (through personal / fiduciary guarantees). For example, authors of US Federal legislation (e.g. Dodd Frank Act) do not specifically consider software development when writing laws and are often ignorant to the downstream effects of said legislation for a development team based in Russia or India. When asked for clarifications the FSOC does not know enough about software development to provide clear and concise answers and the amount of documentation in the said legislation can be (a) in the thousands of pages and (b) within living documents.

In addition, organizations are feeling pressures of their employee base to go Agile / Scrum / Lean. As the way in which we chose to work – our process - is a very personal or team based choice undoubtedly more software developers regardless of regulatory levels will move from Chaotic, Structured and Waterfall environments to Iterative and Agile, following the same pattern as non-regulated industry trends. In f


Speakers
avatar for Pat Reed

Pat Reed

Consultant, iHoriz
Experienced enterprise agile coach and consultant adjunct professor at UC Berkeley Agile Management Program Director on the Agile Alliance Community Leader and co-founder of PMI's Agile Community of Practice experienced Agile Executive for more than 25 years at The Walt Disney Company, Walt Disney Pictures and Television, NBC and Universal Studios, GE and Gap, Inc. 35 years teaching experience at the graduate and undergraduate levels
avatar for Laszlo Szalvay

Laszlo Szalvay

VP, SolutionsIQ
SolutionsIQ, a global provider of Agile transformation and development services, today announced the addition of Laszlo Szalvay as vice president. Szalvay, a recognized Agile development industry thought leader and successful entrepreneur, will lead the company’s marketing, sales and training initiatives. He co-founded the Scrum product and services company Danube that was acquired by CollabNet in 2010, and comes to SolutionsIQ after... Read More →


Tuesday August 6, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Bayou C

3:45pm

Pull vs Push: Keys to Agile Program Management Office Success (Bruce Winegarden)
Limited Capacity seats available

Businesses want to understand what features and deliverables to expect from upcoming software releases. A traditional program management office works to satisfy this desire with project management measurement and control that pushes results through adherence to the plan. Agile and lean can provide an alternative PMO approach using empirical evidence to pull more reliable information with much less wasted overhead. This session will share a proven approach from an agile PMO covering over 20 products with almost 400 product development people. It will explain how to leverage Scrum’s empirical approach for visibility, inspection, and adaptation to satisfy business concerns by pulling information from the inherent feedback loops.

This session will show proven techniques and charts for reliably forecasting feature releases throughout a major release cycle. Then, it will cover how to pull together the big picture for coordinating dependencies across product lines and identifying impacts on operations outside development. We will cover using development allocation charts to understand where the money really goes. Finally we will address overcoming challenges for organizational change to more fully engage the business.

Speakers

Tuesday August 6, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Bayou E

3:45pm

The Agile Dashboard (Fadi Stephan)
Limited Capacity full

There are more to Agile metrics than velocity and sprint burn-down charts. However, most Agile teams just focus on velocity and target story points which leads to executives misusing the metric and teams gaming the system. Velocity should stay within the team and there are other metrics that can be shared with executives and others that are outside the team. These metrics provide a more holistic view of the project’s overall health. The Agile Dashboard collects such metrics and acts as an information radiator giving us real time project updates on value, performance, schedule, scope, cost, quality, and team spirit. Come learn what to measure and for how long. Learn how to read warning signs and what corrective actions to take. Learn to setup your own Agile dashboard to arm yourself with the right information and make careful and constant adjustments to ensure forward and safe progress towards your final deliverable.

Speakers
avatar for Fadi Stephan

Fadi Stephan

Consultant, Excella
Fadi Stephan is a Certified Scrum Trainer (CST), Agile coach, and consultant with Washington DC-based Excella Consulting. Fadi has more than fifteen years of professional experience as a product manager, project manager, software developer, ScrumMaster and consultant at both Federal Agencies and businesses ranging from start-ups to Fortune 500 companies. Since 2006, his focus has been on building high performing organizations and teams that focus... Read More →


Tuesday August 6, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Canal E

3:45pm

The Agile Mindset - Your Questions, Comments, Thoughts? (Linda Rising)
Limited Capacity seats available

At the end of Agile 2011, I gave a talk about the Agile Mindset. Since then I have received an enormous amount of email from people who are interested in this topic. This forum will give us all a chance to learn from each other. I can share the latest research but, more importantly, I hope to hear your stories. How has your life been changed by learning about the two mindsets? What has happened in your families and in your workplaces? What have you learned and what has surprised you? I'm so looking forward to this session -- in my new hometown -- Music City!

Speakers
LR

Linda Rising

Linda Rising LLC


Tuesday August 6, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Delta D

3:45pm

Radically Open Software Testing (Chris McMahon)
Limited Capacity seats available

This talk is about the one-year-old testing and Quality Assurance effort for Wikipedia run by the Wikimedia Foundation. I will discuss the history and background of two testing projects as well as the current state of the practice.

One aspect of this practice is a completely open world-class browser test automation project using the best tools and practices available today. Not only are the tools open source, but the implementation is completely open as well, from the source code to the Jenkins configuration to the real-time test results. Anyone may contribute-- from analyzing test failures, to adding scenarios to be tested, to writing code.

The other aspect of the practice is Exploratory Testing by the greater Wikipedia community and the software testing community. We have synchronous and asynchronous test events, open test environments, and encourage participation by anyone to help test Wikipedia features. Note that contributions by exploratory testers to the automation project are made possible by using an Acceptance Test Driven Development framework, so non-programming people can contribute scenarios to be tested to the automation project.

I founded the QA/testing practice in early 2012. One year later, the testing projects are mature enough to be of interest to the greater software testing and software development community. That these projects are completely open means that they may serve as examples of good practice and good implementation from which others may learn and to which others may contribute.

Speakers
avatar for Chris McMahon

Chris McMahon

QA Lead, Wikimedia Foundation


Tuesday August 6, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Canal A

3:45pm

Rapid User Research - how to gather user insights to build the right product (Aviva Rosenstein, Gabrielle Benefield)
Limited Capacity seats available

If you are building software for people who are not developers, there is a good chance that you are making bad assumptions about their goals, needs, knowledge and skills. And if you don't know what will work for your users, you can't build working software.

Doing user research before and during development helps inform your choices about strategy (what to build) as well as tactics (how to build it)-- and it doesn't have to slow down your development process . In fact some rapidly executed research can speed up your time to market by reducing the need to refactor late in a project.

This presentation will provide practical information that will help product owners and developers quickly get inside the heads of their users, validate product ideas and improve the usability of their software at warp speed. The presenters will share tips and techniques for recruiting research participants, shadowing and interviewing users effectively, getting valuable feedback on product concepts and information architecture, and rapidly iterating on the user interface to improve usability. They will demonstrate remote testing tools that will help teams rapidly identify effective information architecture and labels and test users can successfully achieve their goals with their designs., and cover best practices for live testing and collecting feedback from users after launch.

Speakers
avatar for Gabrielle Benefield

Gabrielle Benefield

CEO, Evolve Beyond
I want to help people build great products that are beautifully designed. I believe in Outcomes over Outputs and being highly adaptive.
avatar for Aviva Rosenstein

Aviva Rosenstein

UX Consultant, Evolve Beyond
I enjoy helping teams build products and tools that empower, inform, entertain and delight users-- and I love teaching people and organizations how to discover (and act on!) user insights.


Tuesday August 6, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Canal C/D

4:30pm

Scrum Code Camps (Lene Pries-Heje, Jan Pries-Heje and Bente Dalgaard)
Limited Capacity seats available

A classic way to choose a supplier is through a bidding process where tenders from competing companies are evaluated in relation to the customer’s requirements. If the customer wants to hire an agile software developing team instead of buying a software product then a new approach for comparing tenders is required. In this paper we present the design of such a new approach, a so-called Scrum Code Camp, which was used to evaluate the ability of agile teams in two different bidding processes with seven competing suppliers. A design science research approach is used to analyze properties of the two instances of the Scrum Code Camp and identify abstract domain requirements and -components of a Scrum Code Camp with the aim of presenting something very useful to others performing competitive bidding processes.


Speakers

Tuesday August 6, 2013 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Presidential Boardroom

5:30pm

Industry Analyst Panel Discussion
Limited Capacity seats available

Agile Trends and Future Directions - Come join the leading industry analysts as they discuss the latest trends and emerging best practices around Agile software development. Learn how the most successful software organizations are utilizing Agile to drive business performance. Find out how the latest innovations in Agile practices continue to mature as development organizations deploy Agile further across the enterprise.

  • Tom Grant, Forrester
  • Thomas Murphy, Gartner
  • Melinda Ballou, IDC
  • Chris Rommel, VDC

Moderators
Speakers
MB

Melinda Ballou

IDC - Ballou serves as program director for IDC's Application Life-Cycle Management research. In this role, Ballou provides thought leadership, expert opinion, research, and analysis through comprehensive research on application life-cycle management (ALM), with specific focus on software life-cycle process configuration and management, software quality, and IT governance software. Ballou also offers competitive intelligence and consulting on key... Read More →
TM

Thomas Murphy

Murphy is focused on IT organizations that develop and deliver software in an efficient and effective fashion. He covers all phases of the life-cycle from requirements through software quality and testing. He is particularly interested in collaborative and agile practices and how organizations must use these to adapt to the increasing pace of change demanded by business to utilize cloud, and mobile technologies. Murphy provides guidance to Sr. IT... Read More →
CR

Chris Rommel

VDC - Rommel is a Research Vice President with VDC Research, covering Machine-to-Machine (M2M) Communications, Embedded Software Technology and Hardware Development. Rommel was named a research vice president with VDC research overseeing M2M and embedded software in August 2011. He was previously a senior analyst with the research firm covering embedded software and tools from 2007 to 2011.


Tuesday August 6, 2013 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Delta D

7:30pm

 
Wednesday, August 7
 

8:30am

Open Jam Huddle

Not finding the session you were looking for? Want to delve deeper into a session you went to? Have an edgy or groundbreaking topic to share? Got some questions you want to discuss?

 

Then you want to come to Open Jam, where folks gather to introduce thoughts and take away ideas while building off of one another's creativity.

 

Anyone may convene an Open Jam session. They are short sessions that run throughout the day, from early in the morning, like Lean Coffee, and sometimes late into the evening! All you need to lead a session is passion and commitment.

 

We encourage interactive sessions providing opportunities to explore ideas and techniques. Sessions don't need to be formal, in fact, it's more fun if they are not!

 

So come to the Open Jam daily huddle at 8:30AM in the Jack Daniels space to choose a time slot for your session, then announce it to fellow conference participants so they can join! Feel free to tweet or promote your session using the conference hashtag #agile2013.

 

Follow @Open_Jam on Twitter for updates to what’s happening at the Open Jam track. Explore more, join Open Jam!


Wednesday August 7, 2013 8:30am - 9:00am
Open Jam - Jack Daniels

9:00am

How simple maths and BELIEF can help you coach people and teams to change (Geoff Watts)
Limited Capacity seats available

Change is hard. Coaching for change is hard. How do you help generate some inertia for people to begin a change? Why do people sometimes choose to change and sometimes not? How can you increase the chances of people changing and how can you be an effective coach for people who want to change? And then, how do you know you are being effective as a coach?

This session will introduce the concept of a change equation that I believe everyone weighs up when considering (even subconsciously) whether to make a change or not. I will then share my model of having BELIEF in your team, or the person you are coaching, to increase your chances of success and then finally a METRIC model for evaluating the effectiveness of coaching for change.

This talk makes use of Mia Kellmer Pringle's book The Needs of Children which outlines 4 basic needs that children have and how, by applying these to my work as a coach it has increased my efficacy and thus the mobility of my clients.

Speakers
avatar for Geoff  Watts

Geoff Watts

Director & Coach, Inspect & Adapt
I am the author of Scrum Mastery: From Good to Great Servant-Leadership and passionate about helping develop great ScrumMasters who, in turn, make great agile organisations. | | I love coaching talented individuals who are looking to develop themselves and make a change at work and helping organisations develop a coaching culture and become more agile.


Wednesday August 7, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Governors E

9:00am

What's In Your Playbook? Strategies To Win The 'Iteration Game' (Jay Packlick, Ty Crockett)
Limited Capacity seats available

Agile is a team sport and in sports, the best teams are masters of strategy. Working with their coaches they develop 'play books'; a catalog of winning plays that they then master and select from when things don't go exactly according to plan.

In this fun and interactive workshop we'll introduce the 'Iteration Game'. Participants will learn how, when, and why to guide teams to develop their own custom 'play books'; a collection of named strategies to use on real projects that reduce cycle times and get more valuable stories across the 'finish line' before the iteration clock runs out.

Speakers
avatar for Ty Crockett

Ty Crockett

Consultant, Improving Enterprises Inc
Servant, Husband, Father, Ally, Agilist, ScrumMaster, Gamer, Artist. | | Agile Coach, ScrumMaster, & Project Manager. I have spent my professional career in the field of Information Technologies. My strength is in getting newly formed groups to become cohesive, self managing, high performing, teams. I have an intense interest in interpersonal interaction, and personality dynamics.
avatar for Jay Packlick

Jay Packlick

Principal / Enterprise Agile Coach, Sabre
Jay spent the first twenty years of his career getting software done in a variety of roles. Excited by how much better everything was using Extreme Programming in 2001, he’s dedicated the last twelve years of his career to learning and helping others implement better ways of getting stuff done. Currently an Enterprise Agile coach at Sabre, Jay uses an Integral approach to working with organizations to foster learning, increase agility at scale... Read More →


Wednesday August 7, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Governors A

9:00am

When NOT to Have All the Answers: Stop Giving Advice and Start Asking Questions (Judith Mills, Christopher Avery)
Limited Capacity seats available

Many coaches, leaders, and collaborators struggle to get others to engage, to step up and take ownership, to commit to the process. What to do? One thing would be to examine our own behavior. What’s our own ratio of giving advice versus asking empowering questions?

This workshop will expose a simple and powerful lesson about being in a position of authority as a coach, mentor, or leader: That giving advice may be the worst thing you can do when you want others to take ownership; and asking empowering and thought-provoking questions may be the best thing you can do.

In this hands-on workshop you will practice asking different types of questions in different contexts and experience the difference between listening to yourself give advice and engaging and empowering others.

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Avery

Christopher Avery

Author and CEO of Partnerwerks, Inc., Partnerwerks, Inc.
I help people find, embrace, and master their natural leadership ability. Author of "The Responsibility Process: Unlocking Your Natural Ability to Live and Lead with Power" and the classic "Teamwork Is An Individual Skill: Getting Your Work Done When Sharing Responsibility." CEO of Partnerwerks, Inc., distributor of The Responsibility Process® products and services. Host of The Leadership Gift™ Program, for a better, more productive way... Read More →
avatar for Judith Mills

Judith Mills

Coach, Judith Mills LLC
Judith Mills is an experienced software executive turned independent coach specializing in making organizations efficient with multiple Agile methodologies. Judith has extensive experience in guiding large organizations and teams through the adoption of Agile to create efficient and adaptable departments that deliver reliably and repeatedly. These organizations and teams have varied from smaller teams with everyone in one room to... Read More →


Wednesday August 7, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Delta B

9:00am

Remote Pair Programming - bringing XP to global developement (Johannes Brodwall)
Limited Capacity seats available

Pair programming is a well known practice for closely connected teams, but can it work for distributed teams as well? Johannes is the Oslo-based chief scientist for the Sri Lanka-based company Exilesoft. He's coaching people in Agile software development practices, including pair programming. To open new possibilities, he is experimenting with remote pair programming as a part of the daily work.

This talk will demonstrate remote pair programming in practice and cover the benefits and drawbacks of a distributed agile programming team. How much will being distributed cost your team, what can you regain from remote pair programming and how does remote pair programming feel compared to normal team work?

The talk will be centered around a demonstration where Johannes pair programs remotely in C# with Visual Studio, Dropbox and Skype with a colleague. If you're non-technical, the code will probably not make too much sense, but he collaboration will. After the demonstration, the talk will cover the questions of how to get started and when remote pair programming is worth the effort.

Speakers
avatar for Johannes  Brodwall

Johannes Brodwall

Chief Scientist, Exilesoft
I love to write software and help others write software better. I've practiced Test-driven development for over 10 years and find that it makes my coding fun and efficient. I've practice pair programming about five years and am now doing more and more remote pairing for fun and profit.


Wednesday August 7, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Canal E

9:00am

Learning to See – The Practical Application of Lean in DevOps (Robert Benefield)
Limited Capacity seats available

Much like Cloud Computing, there is a lot of noise and confusion around DevOps. Some think that it is about tooling and automation, while others seem to think that it is about either the merging of Operations with Engineering or elimination of Operations itself. Focusing on too narrow a set of solutions creates local suboptimization, often exaccerbating the problems this approach was trying to solve. Whereas eliminating Operations entirely trivialises the complexity of the system that Operations co-exists within, again increasing risk and providing bandaids where surgery was required.

Successful organisations that run effectively will instead focus on the systemic over the symptomatic problems, and target the outcomes for the holistic organisation over their own internal technical issues. To effectively instigate systematic improvement we need to provide transparency, alignment, and collaboration between all of the groups, of which DevOps is an essential piece.

Successful implementations focus on the crux of the problem – there are far too many mental, organisational and technological barriers producing so much friction that people lose sight of the big picture. One must find ways to eliminate this friction, allow information to flow so that people can rapidly understand, respond to and pivot based upon ecosystem feedback. It requires going back to the core of Agile itself. By adapting concepts from Boyd's OODA Loop and applying techniques from Lean, it is possible to teach an organization to learn to see.

This session provides a pragmatic 'from-the-trenches' step by step walk through of a DevOps transformation using over 10 years of our own personal experiences running and turning around transformations that span from an early SaaS startup through to some of the largest global enterprises in Energy, Finance, Software and Telecommunications with companies like Yahoo, BT and Skype.

We will cover:

* the typical starting point of how to meaningfully “walk the gemba (the shop floor)” from the e

Speakers
avatar for Robert  Benefield

Robert Benefield

CTO, Evolve Beyond
Robert Benefield has over 20 years of executive leadership experience building and leading world-class global lean and high performance engineering and technical operations organizations in demanding high uptime environments. He has deep experience in such industries as investment banking, defence, energy, software, pharmaceutical, telecommunications, embedded, and Internet service industries. Robert has led IT service management... Read More →


Wednesday August 7, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Governors C

9:00am

Agile & Waterfall: living together in perfect harmony! (Erick Bergmann, Andy Hamilton)
Limited Capacity full

Schneider Electric has a long history (more than 175 years). We have been successful in promoting Waterfall process as the only manner to boost innovation and create new products, but also to ensure consistency across all teams (spread in 60 major R&D centers in about 23 countries).
In the last 5 years, a large transition towards solutions and smart products has led to a growing part of our development being dedicated to software (more than 3,000 people worldwide). As a result, a traditional approach was no longer the best solution and it was time to turn towards Agile for efficiency and speed.
At the same time, most of our projects combine hardware and software and Agile itself could not be THE silver bullet.
So the Agile transition team proposed a hybrid framework, combining waterfall for the hardware/system level project management with Agile for the software components.
On the surface, these two methodologies seem conflicted. After an effort to understand the principles and constraints driving each team, we clarified how to collaborate efficiently and synchronize the execution for everyone. The outcome was to transform the initial disconnect into an efficient development machine leveraging the best of both worlds.
The model developed can easily be tailored to many different project environments and in particular for scaling-up with multiple teams working together in parallel.

Speakers
avatar for Erick Bergmann

Erick Bergmann

PMP & Agile Offer Creation Deployment Leader, Schneider Electric
avatar for Andy Hamilton

Andy Hamilton

Offer Creation Process Design Manager & Project Manager Function Leader, Schneider Electric


Wednesday August 7, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Bayou E

9:00am

Circles and Links as Effective Structures for Scaling (Daniel LeFebvre)
Limited Capacity seats available

Are you struggling with delivering large programs using agile techniques? Does your Scrum of Scrums lack the energy and drive to get things done? Does the structure of your organization create barriers to communication, collaboration, and decision-making?

All organizations have the core business needs of effective transmission of information, quick decision-making, and enacting those decisions throughout the organization. Static hierarchies are a poor strategy for fulfilling those needs in today’s dynamic business world. This session will explore alternatives for designing scalable organizations that keep the benefits of agility and collaboration intact. It will introduce three key principles to improve the flow of information throughout the organization and produce decisions that stick.

Speakers

Wednesday August 7, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Bayou B

9:00am

Refactoring as a Lifeline: Lessons Learned from Refactoring (Amr Noaman)
Limited Capacity seats available

Teams transitioning to Agile usually suffer from issues due to large inherited technical debt. In our example, we have faced problems like moving towards shorter iterations with shorter time for regression testing, trying to cover poor code with automated tests, prioritizing which refactorings to apply on which code, and convincing managers with the value of refactoring.

To tackle these challenges, we have crafted a roadmap of three stages: (1) Quick-wins; simple and least risky enhancements (2) Divide-and-conquer the code into functional, utility, and architectural components, with identified and clear component interfaces. (3) Build quality in the code by wrapping components with automated tests. The intent was not to refactor, but to qualify the code to be refactor-able!

In this session, I will present the challenges that we met while applying this model on two products (300 kloc and 1 million loc). I will explain which steps worked well and which did not, and when it was necessary to step over some of them and why. I will explain how we tried to answer the famous question by managers: *When are we going to finish?*, I will explain some visual indicators used to relate the effort spent with the value achieved. I will also present some insights about refactoring anti-patterns that we found out to be the real impediments of refactoring. Finally, I will present interesting facts about how managers are involved in such technical effort, and how developers sustained such a lengthy and hectic roadmap of refactorings.

Speakers
avatar for Amr Noaman

Amr Noaman

Co-Founder & Principal Consultant, Agile Academy
Over the last 7 years, Amr’s primary role was to spread agile awareness and lean thinking in software organizations in Egypt and the Middle East. Amr is the co-founder of Agile Academy and Egypt's Lean & Agile Network, one of the largest Agile communities in the Middle East. | In 2011, Amr has initiated Egypt's GoAgile program, the biggest agile adoption initiative sponsored by the Egyptian government for expanding agile practices and lean... Read More →


Wednesday August 7, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Bayou D

9:00am

The 7 Essentials of Leading an Agile Transformation (Brian Lawrence)
Limited Capacity filling up

Many companies think the way to transform to Agile is to bring in an Agile training company, train all their employees, then set the teams loose, sit back, and do business as usual. These companies can’t understand why, after a year or so, they still aren’t “Agile” and why projects continue to flounder. One of the keys is to understand that Agile transformations require managers to do more leading and less managing. For managers, Agile is about paving the way, then getting out of the way. Brian Lawrence talks about Gateway EDI’s Agile transformation and the role of both IT and business leaders in this transformation. He presents 7 key essentials that managers need to learn and follow in order for an Agile transformation to succeed. These essentials include dealing with non-Agile business thinking, IT management style changes, how roles such as project managers must transform, and how to measure success without fostering negative behavior.

Speakers
avatar for Brian Lawrence

Brian Lawrence

IT Director, TriZetto Provider Solutions (formerly Gateway EDI)
I have been a process junky since the days of Edward Yourdan. During my career I've taken development organizations through many methdology transformations. I love process improvement and looking at ways of doing things better, faster, cheaper. | | In my spare time, I write short stories as well as theological blog entries. I also teach English at local colleges as a hobby.


Wednesday August 7, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Canal C/D

9:00am

Being Agile with Processes, Methods, Checkpoints and Governance Procedures (Ian Spence)
Limited Capacity full

Large-scale agile adoptions often fall at one of two hurdles: 1. The organization selects a specific agile method or framework which it then tailors to produce the ultimate, one-size fits all company specific agile method. One that typically entails enforcing a level of prescription and governance at odds with agility and the diversity of work found in most software development organizations. 2. Although successful locally the early agile adopters fall out of governance and never link themselves into the broader organizational units, programmes, or portfolios that sponsor and fund them.

These and many other hurdles can be overcome if you are agile with your methods and processes, and adopt a practice independent, result-focussed approach to governance, compliance and process assurance.

In this hands-on workshop, with case studies drawn from many large-scale agile adoptions including KPN and Munich Re, attendees will learn how to empower teams to own and evolve their methods, understand where they are, monitor progress and health, share their practices and experiences, and define result based governance and compliance practices

This session uses the emerging SEMAT / OMG Essence standard, kernel and state cards to get hands on with results-based check points, check lists and health checks.


Speakers
avatar for Ian Spence

Ian Spence

Chief Scientist, Ivar Jacobson International
I am passionate about helping people get better at software development, and have been lucky enough to have been involved in many large-scale agile adoptions over the years reaching 1000's of people. | | Having worked in many fields for all different sizes of company I am currently passionate about practical mechanisms for scaling agile and in particular SAFe, agile for large programs, and driving sustainable change with actionable measures... Read More →


Wednesday August 7, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Bayou C

9:00am

The Agile Planning Mindset: estimating and forecasting a release with a real backlog (Peter Green)
Limited Capacity full

Relative estimation is a big mindshift for many developers that have been doing time estimates for years (and being repeatedly punished for guessing wrong). Deriving a release plan based on velocity (which is based on those relative size estimates) is an even bigger shift for many Product Owners. This session will walk attendees through a series of quick exercises that, after dozens of iterations with real classes, I have found teach relative estimation in a way that gets developers completely out of the business of mentally converting story points to time and back again to story points to derive their estimates. The key is visual grouping, and attendees will work a realistic product backlog through affinity estimation, planning poker, and release forecasting using velocity, with a chance for Q&A about the various techniques and their pros and cons.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Green

Peter Green

Coach and Trainer, Agile For All
Peter Green led a grass roots Agile transformation at Adobe from 2005 to 2015, starting with his own team, Adobe Audition. His influence includes the teams behind such software flagships as Photoshop, Acrobat, After Effects, Flash, Dreamweaver and Premiere Pro, as well as dozens of internal IT and platform technology teams and groups such as marketing and globalization. His work was a major factor enabling Adobe product teams to successfully... Read More →


Wednesday August 7, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Bayou A

9:00am

The Missing P: PRODUCT (Linda Merrick)
Limited Capacity filling up

Project, Program, and Portfolio management are necessary, but not sufficient. The missing element? Product Management. Viewing the software we work on not just as a collection of projects, but as a product that moves through a lifecycle is essential to good portfolio management and true delivery on business value.

Product Owners, Program Managers, and IT Portfolio Managers often lack this critical perspective, evidenced by frequently-changing roadmaps, continuing dissatisfaction from business stakeholders, and low adoption rates.

In this 75-minute presentation, we will explore the top responsibilities that are critical to product, portfolio, and personal success. Topics include:

* The secret of effective roadmaps: product lifecycles and strategies

* Developing light-weight but effective business cases

* Agile approaches for product launch and adoption

These topics will bring insight to the following track questions:

* If we are so good at Agile project, program, and portfolio management, why are so many companies on their second or third attempt?

* How have you merged organization strategy with project and portfolio management?

* What tools and techniques work for you in moving organizations to a more Lean and Agile planning and delivery process?

Participants will receive a tool in each area to help them improve their process and performance on the job.

Speakers
avatar for Linda Merrick

Linda Merrick

Senior Consultant, Trainer, Coach, Pivotal Product Management
By improving product management process and skills, we help companies choose, create, and launch successful products.


Wednesday August 7, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Canal B

9:00am

Research Lightning Talks
Short talks about research in progress.  Talks include:
  1. Larry Maccherone, "Quantify the Impact of Agile Practices" 
  2. Michael Wainer, "Agile User Interface Design Models as Outside-In Refactoring Tools"
  3. Jaana Nyfjord, "Eliciting Higher Level Conventions for Managers Coordinating Many Agile Teams"
  4. Alan Shalloway, "Third Generation Lean-Agile"
  5. Mike Coughenour, "Scaling of Systems Engineering for Agility in Complex Systems"
  6. Suzanne Miller, "Readiness & Fit: Agile Adoption Factors in Regulated Environments"
  7. Jabe Bloom, "Experiences of an Experimental Leader"
  8. Ted Hellmann, "Why Isn't Testing Research Helping Practitioners?"
  9. Richard Turner, "Applying Lean and Agile in Operational Systems Engineering"

Wednesday August 7, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Presidential Boardroom

9:00am

Agile + Lean = Speed, Customer Value, and Disruptive Innovation (Steve Bell)
Limited Capacity seats available

How do Agile and Lean work together?
What is Lean, anyhow? Lean Governance? A Lean Startup?
What does it mean to be a Lean leader? How can business and IT work better together?
Come ask questions; let’s learn together!


Speakers
avatar for Steve Bell

Steve Bell

Founder, Lean IT Strategies
What energizes me: | People are amazing and resourceful. Often however they are surrounded by wasteful business processes and leadership behaviors that can stifle their effectiveness. In the private, public and nonprofit sectors alike, Lean and Agile thinking can help us energize and align people to continuously improve and innovate in order to serve others better. | | Bio: | Steve Bell is author of 'Run Grow Transform' and 'Lean... Read More →


Wednesday August 7, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Delta D

9:00am

The Lion, the Mouse and the thorn of Usability Testing (Matthew Hodgson, Mia Horrigan)
Limited Capacity seats available

Traditionally, all testing, including assessing how easy real users can use your software, occurs in the very last phase of the project. Modern agile teams, though, now embed UX practitioners working either with the team or a Sprint behind to test features as they're produced. But what if the team lacks the UX capability to sufficiently understand and test the usability of the features they've produced? How can they assure that products are more than just functional but are highly valued and intuitive to use, particularly in an enterprise environment where users are too often informed that training will solve the problem?

Matthew will present a case study of usability testing in a Scrum project operating in an enterprise using Waterfall -- an interactive session that will examine UX techniques and the psycho-cognitive factors that underpin them to enable usabilty testing in the absence of dedicated usability practitioners. He'll detail the issues experienced in adapting user-experience testing methods and techniques – heuristics, cognitive walk-thru and expert review – to the Sprint cycle, the role the coach took in an attempt to increase awareness of the impact of design debt in the developer-only team, and the re-work that resulted that could have otherwise been avoided. Matthew will articulate the major usability findings from assessing the features produced by the team, the remedies to improve usability in the context of the Scrum by drawing on Lean thinking, and the Enterprise Definition of Done for all software development projects that emerged. Specifically, Matthew look at the question of timing of usability testing in Scrum and answer it with lessons learned from his experiences on this project, and conclude by looking at experiences with this, and a number of other teams, and the conflict in ideology that has often arisen between minimal viable product, minimal *usable* feature, and what an end-user values.

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Hodgson

Matthew Hodgson

Lead Partner for Enterprise Agile Transformation, Zen Ex Machina
Matthew has been using psychology to further ICT cultural change goals for 20 years. He is a contributing author to the books 'The Emergence of the Relationship Economy' and 'The Psychology of Aid' and continues to publish in international journals in the fields of psychology on the pragmatic aspects of learning, change, teamwork and motivation. | | As an agile coach, Matthew applies techniques from his background in psych and 20 years of... Read More →
avatar for Mia Horrigan

Mia Horrigan

Country Director of Service Delivery, Orion Health
Mia leads the service delivery implementation team in Australia. Mia's focus is on delivering value to customers as efficiently as possible and ensuring that the Orion Health Team develop and grow their delivery capabilities | | Since joining Orion, Mia has been working with the Global Product Development team to present a program roadmap and technology transition plan to one of Australia's key clients and Mia was a key advocate for the change... Read More →


Wednesday August 7, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Canal A

9:00am

Just the Facts - Overcoming Biases With Data (Brandon Carlson)
Limited Capacity seats available

According to the Standish group, 64 percent of features in systems are rarely—or never—used. How does this happen? Today, the work of eliciting the customers' true needs, which remains elusive, can be enhanced using data-driven requirements techniques. Brandon Carlson introduces some of the reasons why identifying customer needs is so difficult and how you can improve them using data collection techniques that you can employ on your projects right away. Find out how to instrument existing applications and develop new requirements based on operational profiles of the current system. Learn to use A/B testing—a technique for trying out and analyzing alternative implementations—on your current system to determine which new features will deliver the most business value. With these tools at hand, you can help users and business stakeholders decide the best approaches and best new features to meet their real needs. Now is the time to take the guesswork out of requirements and get the facts.

Speakers
avatar for Brandon Carlson

Brandon Carlson

IT Nerd, Lean TECHniques, Inc.
A self-proclaimed nerd with over 15 years of experience, Brandon has become passionate about elevating the performance of IT as a whole, and has helped numerous organizations from startups to Fortune 100 companies improve their product development and delivery systems. Brandon’s current interests include data-driven product definition/development and professionalism in the world of IT. He can be reached on Twitter and pretty much everywhere... Read More →


Wednesday August 7, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Governors D

10:45am

Hiring (or Growing) the Right Agile Coach (Lyssa Adkins)
Limited Capacity seats available

There are as many types of agile coaches out there as there are flavors of ice cream. And, their levels of leadership maturity and skill can vary just as widely. It can leave one fretting, “What am I really getting when I bring in an agile coach? And, how do I ‘grow’ my own?” In fact, what are the “must have” skills of an agile coach and how can you tell if your coach has them? The Agile Coach Competency Framework is one big clue to answering these questions. Over the past two years, this framework has guided the development of hundreds of agile coaches. Agile managers and champions also use it to obtain “truth in advertising” to hire the right coach at the right time. We will explore this framework and provide lightening-talk-style case studies that showcase how it has been used in the real world. You’ll leave with ideas and actions to help you become a more savvy purveyor (and/or developer) of agile coaches.

Speakers
avatar for Lyssa Adkins

Lyssa Adkins

Coach of Agile Coaches, Agile Coaching Institute
I came to Agile as a project leader with over 15 years project management expertise. Even with all that experience, nothing prepared me for the power and simplicity of Agile done well.My Agile experience, along with my professional coaching and training abilities, gives me the perspective needed to guide teams and Agile leaders to harness Agile as the competitive advantage weapon it was meant to be. I know the transformation path is rocky. As a... Read More →


Wednesday August 7, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Governors C

10:45am

Communication Katas: Deliberate Practice for Shared Understanding (Andrew Annett, Susan Johnston)
Limited Capacity full

The first value of the Agile Manifesto relies on a huge assumption – that we know how to interact effectively. Real world experience shows us that interaction can be tricky. Misunderstanding is common and that leads to wasted time, effort and resources.

This session will introduce you to five Communication Katas – practices you can learn and master to improve communication and working relationships. These conscious practices will prepare you for effective conversations that promote shared understanding. Small adjustments can lead to big improvements in the way teams work. And that contributes to better outcomes.

Face-to-face communication is the most important tool we will ever use. In this session, you’ll upgrade that tool as you explore and practise practical skills that increase clarity, diminish anxiety and reduce misunderstanding. Used consciously and consistently, Communication Katas help us in our individual capacity as team members, leaders and role models. They also help us develop people. When practised by a whole team, they influence organizational culture.

Join us in crafting conscious conversations that lead to results.


Speakers
avatar for Andrew Annett

Andrew Annett

Lean/Agile Coach, Leaninntuit
Andrew is a coach and facilitator who is passionate about helping teams improve product delivery. He is focused on promoting shared understanding through better communication practices.He joined the agile community having survived a career of big-plan-up-front development and transformation programs in large financial institutions. Along the way he was distracted by involvement in startups and some unusual infrastructure projects and developing... Read More →
avatar for Susan Johnston

Susan Johnston

Coach and Trainer, It's Understood / Leanintuit
I help you talk so people listen, listen so people talk and change the world one conversation at a time. A professional coach and trainer, my specialty is interaction at work, particularly as it applies to workplace change. | | I enjoy helping technical people learn the skills of coaching and facilitation that will make them more effective at work. (My learning programs are accredited by ICAgile.) | | Based in Waterloo, Ontario, I'm... Read More →


Wednesday August 7, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Bayou C

10:45am

Continual Backlog Refinement, Get Stories to Ready (David Bulkin, Kevin Fisher)
Limited Capacity full

There once was a myth that developers and testers should passively consume product backlog items created by the Product Owner. After all, the Product Owner is continually grooming the backlog.


Great product backlogs, just like great code-bases, and products, are created by the continual effort of many over a long period of time. In this session, we will look at real world strategies for working across role to look ahead and **actively prepare our user stories for upcoming iterations.**


We will review continual backlog refinement, based on various organizations situations, comparing large teams, small teams, simple domains, complex domains, etc. The session will start with a case study, move on to general knowledge sharing about readiness, and then we will have a hands-on workshop where you the attendees will **present and discuss alternative to address different organizational issues** (e.g. you will define what backlog refinement approach fits your situation).

Speakers
DB

David Bulkin

VP and Head of Training Services, LitheSpeed
David Bulkin is a VP and Head of Training Services at LitheSpeed, where he delivers training and coaching to clients in North America, Australia, India, Europe and Africa. David is a part time agile editor at InfoQ, and co-founder of the Agile Leadership Network of NJ. David has 30 years experience delivering software and systems and has been applying agile methods for 10+ years across the entire value stream from strategy and product ideation to... Read More →


Wednesday August 7, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Bayou B

10:45am

Let's Code: Test-Driven JavaScript with James Shore (James Shore)
Limited Capacity seats available

Today's applications run on the web, and they're only getting more complicated. The old toss a few lines of JavaScript on a page and pray it doesn't break approach doesn't cut it any more. In this session, we look at applying rigorous software development techniques like test-driven development to the problems of cross-browser, cross-platform JavaScript development. Bring your laptop and be prepared to code!

Speakers
avatar for James Shore

James Shore

James Shore teaches, writes, and consults on Agile development processes. He led his first Agile team in 1999 and was an early adopter of Extreme Programming in 2000. Today, he focuses on helping people understand how all aspects of Agile, from technical, to business, to social, fit together to create successful software projects. | | James is an inaugural recipient of the Agile Alliance's Gordon Pask Award for Contributions to Agile... Read More →


Wednesday August 7, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Bayou A

10:45am

Capacity Planning on the Fly!! (Maulan Byron)
Limited Capacity seats available

Find out how a 3-person performance analysis team kept up with a 200-person development organization with little more than some spreadsheets and a little light queuing theory!

Suppose you had a complex application stack of 70+ services that you knew you'd have to scale out by four orders of magnitude over the next two years. You don't have auto scaling on your private cloud--although few things auto-scale *that* far anyway. The developers are somehow too busy implementing features to add instrumentation to their code, and it's nearly impossible to obtain a representative full-stack load environment because the agile teams are changing things constantly! What would you do?

With the transition to the use of virtualized infrastructure as a invaluable part of companies strategies going forward. It is very import for organization to be able to effective apply a useful capacity and scalability approach to this new type of infrastructure.

The main players in the private cloud space are still lacking in the amount of performance metrics that they expose to performance engineers. This in tern makes it very challenging for performance engineering as a discipline to adapt their approaches to providing viable capacity and scale solutions for scaling a private cloud.

The approach I am proposing is simple in terms of how it can be implemented but has proven to offer rapid and reliable Performance and Scalability model. What this approach shows is an entire system can be modeled rapidly by simply applying the Universal Scalability model to each component and then tying each modeled component together using basic Queuing theory.

Speakers
avatar for Maulan Byron

Maulan Byron

I'm passionate about making software scale better and run faster! | Build more robust software with more fault tolerance.!?!


Wednesday August 7, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Canal B

10:45am

You're Not Failing Fast Enough: best practices for an Agile build system (Sarah Goff-Dupont)
Limited Capacity seats available

A team's agility is severely limited when developers have to wait 4, 6, even 24 hours to learn whether their latest change plays nicely with the rest of the code base. And untangling bugs introduced by other changes made in the meantime can take hours, which arrests team velocity.

If that doesn't sound like your idea of fun, what might be more enjoyable is learning a few ways to tighten the "feedback loop". If your code is going to fail, let's make sure it fails FAST! From plugins you can add to your build server, to dependent build hierarchies, to multi-threaded testing, there are many ways to grease the gears in your continuous integration system that are (spolier alert!) well within the reach of most teams. We'll explore tricks of the trade with real-world examples from real-world teams who use them.

This talk is tool- and language-neutral (with a certain bias toward plain-spoken English).



Wednesday August 7, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Canal C/D

10:45am

Experimenting in the Enterprise (David Bland, Brian Bozzuto)
Limited Capacity seats available

The life span of the S&P 500 is the shortest it has ever been in recorded history. Large organizations are dealing with extreme uncertainty that challenges the manner in which we organize, lead, visualize and deliver work. In this talk, we will explain how both mid-size organizations and multi-billion dollar organizations are adopting Lean Startup, Business Model Generation and Customer Development to rethink how they create, capture and deliver value.


Wednesday August 7, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Governors D

10:45am

How Writers Can Thrive in Agile (Gavin Austin)
Limited Capacity seats available

Many writers are trying to figure out how to meet deadlines, write quality documentation, and stay sane as their software companies switch from the traditional “waterfall” method of development to the popular Agile methodology. However, there is limited—if any—information on how writers can cope in such an environment. How do we know? Because in 2006, Salesforce.com switched to Agile. Our Documentation and User Assistance team found few external resources to help us work with Agile, even though our executives, managers, and Agile coaches were determined to help us succeed. Through trial and error, we've created several techniques to help our team of 70+ writers thrive in Agile. From our experience, you’ll learn:

* Problems writers faced when switching to Agile
* Implementation solutions for writers
* Daily best practices for writers
* Team best practices for writers
* The benefits of writing in Agile

Speakers
avatar for Gavin Austin

Gavin Austin

Principal Technical Writer, Salesforce
At Salesforce, Gavin Austin writes everything from UI text to API developer guides. Since 2008, he has delivered a number of highly-rated presentations at Writers UA, STC Summits, Agile2013, Intelligent Content Conference, Blue Shield of California, and San Francisco State University.


Wednesday August 7, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Canal A

10:45am

A Journey into Leadership: Empower Your Team (Tricia Broderick)
Limited Capacity filling up

We all experience situations where certain realizations seem obvious after the fact, yet, difficult to acknowledge in the moment. As I reflect back on my numerous struggles with successfully empowering teams, I am overwhelmed with wondering how I didn’t learn the lessons faster. As a result, I’ve committed to helping others be exposed by sharing my personal challenge of transitioning into a leader. Learn about assumptions and expectations surrounding self-managing teams, misunderstandings of the work required to successfully empower, and reasons why this trap is so easy. Leave with altered views on embracing a change in perspective that is required in order to avoid sending mixed messages to your teams. All while, gaining an understanding of the exciting new contributions and challenges you will master as a leader.

Speakers

Wednesday August 7, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Bayou E

10:45am

Temenos—the Healing Container (Olaf Lewitz, Michael Sahota)
Limited Capacity seats available

We can all engage in an authentic connection with others, and it's out of this authentic connection that healing takes place. —Marshall Rosenberg

Although learning culture is essential to Agile, our learning is often focused on the process and practices, so that we learn how to better do Agile. In addition, we can learn a lot about ourselves and one another as human beings to become better at being Agile. The better the team can improve their own behaviour, the better they will be able to improve the behaviour of their product.

Many organisational dysfunctions have their causes in people's hearts, not people's minds. Expectations, obligations, judgements — coercive behaviours are so common that most of us hide a lot of wounds and carry much emotional baggage with us. Any journey becomes lighter with less baggage.

Temenos, a format developed by Siraj Sirajuddin, is a healing container that you can create to help any team grow these capabilities and grow their community. It is viable for any kind of influencer independent of her role: leader, coach, developer, manager…

Healthy, high-trust relationships are built by authentic, empathic connections. This enables and amplifies learning within the team, and in their interactions with their customers. Our ability to delight directly correlates with our capability for emotional flow.

In this workshop, you will learn how to establish relational flow to foster courage, confidence, self-awareness and trust.

Speakers
avatar for Olaf Lewitz

Olaf Lewitz

Trust Artist, trustartist.com
Witch, Nomad, Pioneer.Trust Artist. Connecting with people to enable them to increase trust, in themselves and others.Will stay when needed and leave when wanted.Loving and challenging.Using Scrum, Kanban, CoreProtocols, NVC, agile or better.
avatar for Michael Sahota

Michael Sahota

Guide & Certified Enterprise Coach, Agilitrix (Independent Consultant)
I believe people deliver astounding results when they have Passion and Purpose. Joy and Meaning. Creativity, Safety, Trust and Belonging. I believe we can foster work environments where people can grow and evolve to unleash their best every day. | | I help people cultivate their organizational culture. To invite a more conscious way of being and relating. To evolve organizational structures and practices that foster new ways of working... Read More →


Wednesday August 7, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Bayou D

10:45am

The Art of Being Wrong (Laurent Bossavit)
Limited Capacity seats available

Hate being wrong? You are not alone - it's a dreadful feeling.

One would have to be a little crazy to keep a daily record of the thoughts you firmly believed in yesterday and that turned out wrong today. Wouldn't one? Yet, if you rarely or never *consciously* make mistakes, how do you think you can possibly improve?

This impertinent and playful workshop is an invitation to transform your everyday mistakes into a useful game of continuous improvement. There will be exercises, just enough theory to get by, and maybe some soul-searching.

Come and learn a new super-power: that of making predictions that can actually yield actionable feedback and help you improve as a forecaster in all areas of life.

Speakers

Wednesday August 7, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Governors E

10:45am

Transparent Decisions: Managing the Project Portfolio (Johanna Rothman)
Limited Capacity seats available

What do your customers care about? Running tested features in released products. What do we too often *do* in organizations? Placating enough people across the organization to making some progress on everything, but finishing nothing. Does that make sense to you?

Instead, we can use agile and lean project portfolio management. We don’t have to rely on dog-and-pony shows, prediction, math, ROI, or estimation. We have much better tools: project value, backlog value and demos.

We ask questions that help you differentiate each project's value from each other. How will *this* project move the organization forward? We start with the zeroth question: Should we do this project at all? We continue with qualitative questions and then ask quantitative questions.

We start with qualitative questions, such as using business value points, which are based not on any predictive number, but might be based on your product's position in the market, or who is waiting for your projects to be complete, or the risk of waiting of waiting for your projects to be done. What's critical is your *discussion* around the business value, not the points themselves. I'll supply you with some meaty starting questions for the business value discussion.

If you ask quantitative questions first, they devolve into ROI and you never ask the good qualitative questions. If you do need to have some idea of the budget, I’ll address that question, too. But budget is the wrong question. Value is the right question, and we’ll discuss why.

Quantitative questions are interesting too, once you understand the qualitative value of each project and its relative rank to each other. I have many suggestions for understanding where the projects are. Even more important, I have suggestions for understanding the health of your project portfolio.

In this presentation, Johanna will show you how an agile and lean approach to the project portfolio can help both technical staff and management see what’s going on, how to apply agile and lean to the project

Speakers
avatar for Johanna Rothman

Johanna Rothman

President, Rothman Consulting
Johanna Rothman, known as the "Pragmatic Manager," provides frank advice for your tough problems. She helps leaders and teams see problems and resolve risks and manage their product development. | | Johanna was the Agile 2009 conference chair. She is the current agileconnection.com technical editor. Johanna is the author of several books including: Agile and Lean Program Management: Scaling Collaboration Across the Organization... Read More →


Wednesday August 7, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Delta B

10:45am

Agile Contracting: A Systems Thinking Perspective (Simon Bennett)
Limited Capacity seats available

In the first decade of Agility, the primary focus was on "how" to write an Agile Contract. Progress has been made, but the limits to our capabilities is now around the system level effects of the contracts we put into place. Contracts that too often work against the customer's interests, whilst appearing to serve them

Come discuss and explore the bigger picture and the greater possibilities afforded by re-addressing the fundamental assumptions behind contract negotiation and customer supplier relations.


Speakers
SB

Simon Bennett

Managing Principle, LASTing Benefits
Simon is currently Managing Principal for LASTing Benefits (UK / Australia). | | LASTing Benefits is a boutique consultancy specialising in augmenting Lean and Agile adoptions with cognitive complexity and systems thinking techniques to create self sustaining organisational change. | | Simon's particular interest and expertise lie in how the systems and scenarios we find ourselves in drive our behaviour; specifically the ways in which we... Read More →


Wednesday August 7, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Delta D

10:45am

Agile Quality Assurance: The Long Ugly Tale of How We Got Better (Tommy Norman, Fahed Sider)
Limited Capacity full

Come hear the tale of a company's trek to adopt Scrum and other Agile practices and how they turned a culture of just get it done to one that put quality first. Listen to the woeful beginnings where developers outnumbered quality engineers 7 to 1 and could never keep up during each Sprint. Cringe as you are immersed into a culture where code was king and testing was often scuttled or entirely left out. Despair with us while hearing the agonizing accounts of team ripped asunder by vast distances, bristling attitudes, and disparate values. Follow along with our small band of heroes as they strive to bring the true values of Agile, starting with localized successes while continuously pounding against the walls of inertia around the company's management. Feel the hope as their movement gains hold and their number of converts increases until at last the walls of muscle memory collapse and a new era of collaborative teams delivering release ready, quality code at the end of each Sprint.

In all seriousness, this session is an account of our struggle with Agile with a focus on Quality Assurance. Presented from various view points of a developer turned QA manager turned Agile coach and the QA lead who helped him bring about a cultural focus on Quality that was 3 years in the making. We'll discuss our many missteps, our techniques to bring everyone into the fold from engineering up to management, and how we put practices in place to sustain that culture.

Speakers
avatar for Tommy Norman

Tommy Norman

Senior Consultant, Holland Square Group
Tommy Norman is a Senior Consultant with Holland Square Group leading their Agile Solutions group. For over 17 years he has been helping clients build solutions using both Agile and traditional approaches as a Certified Scrum Master / Practitioner as well as a Microsoft ALM MVP. Tommy is a coordinator for the Nashville Agile User Group, one of the original founders of the devLink Technical Conference, a past president and board member of the... Read More →
avatar for Fahed Sider

Fahed Sider

Consulting Engineer, Software Quality, Omnicell
Fahed Sider is a Software Quality Consulting Engineer with Omnicell. He is an agilest and software tester that loves to learn new concepts. Recognized throughout his career as an expert technical leader and trainer with in-depth experience in agile testing using scrum methodology. He is passionate about sharing best practices with colleagues and the tech world. When not working he enjoys backcountry exploration and outdoor adventures.


Wednesday August 7, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Canal E

10:45am

Impact Mapping: helping you understand what makes the world spin (Inger Dickson, Jeffrey Davidson)
Limited Capacity seats available

Because of Agile and better engineering techniques we have pretty much solved the problem of “delivering” software. Unfortunately, it’s not enough. Now we need to turn our focus to delivering “the right” software – software that makes an impact to the customer.

The answer to building the right software begins with a better understanding of the business opportunity and goals. Best of all, we can do this using a collection of familiar concepts, combined in a powerful new way, bringing a shared and measurable vision to agile product management. This approach is called “Impact Mapping.”

This workshop introduces “Impact Mapping” by demonstrating a collaborative approach to solving the challenge of building the right thing. Breaking into small teams, we will build a sample Impact Map, learn to identify and verify the assumptions you've made, and find new approaches to solving the business problem. We will also discuss using this to measure the output of our effort. Attending participants will receive a handout with a worked example and sample questions and techniques that help lead to a successful mapping session.

Don’t miss this opportunity to learn about and practice the techniques to uncover assumptions and motivations about your current project – and ensure your next project makes the right impact on customers and bottom line. Let's help our customers better refine and communicate their goals. Impact Mapping is at the heart of the customer voice because it literally gives voice to their needs. We will see you at IMPACT MAPPING!


Speakers
avatar for Jeffrey Davidson

Jeffrey Davidson

Principal, Leading Great Teams
Jeffrey Davidson helps teams uncover their greatness. It’s there already, but too often hiding. Using a combination of stories, engagement, and activities, Jeffrey lays the groundwork for lasting change in leaders and teams; building models of execution and cooperation, guiding world-class teams into the #futureofwork.
avatar for Inger Dickson

Inger Dickson

Lead BA, ThoughtWorks


Wednesday August 7, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Governors A

2:00pm

The Curious, Present and Empathetic Agile Leader (Gil Broza)
Limited Capacity full

As an Agile leader, your responsibility is to support teams in the effective expression of Agile principles, values and practices. Do you ever face resistance, stonewalling, difficult culture, unexpected behavior, and ingrained convictions like “Don’t even try this, it won’t work”? Do you find yourself “buying into” others’ stories, resorting to “telling,” and doubting your ability and perception? In this session you’ll learn and experience foundational beliefs, personal states and attitudes that will allow you to remain grounded, curious, empathetic, confident and adjusting even in the toughest circumstances.

Speakers
avatar for Gil Broza

Gil Broza

Principal Agile Mentor, Coach, Owner, 3P Vantage
Making software development effective, humane, and responsible


Wednesday August 7, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Bayou A

2:00pm

Tools from Psychology for coaches, trainers and team members (Bruno Sbille)
Limited Capacity filling up

Have you ever witnessed one of those scenes?

- A member of your team is constantly complaining. Whenever you want to help, he appears to systematically reject any proposed solution
- Someone complains regularly to never have recognition for his work, while you say thank you for your work quite often

Together, using two simple (but powerful) models from psychology (Karpman's drama triangle and Neil Fleming's VAK model) we will identify what kind of mechanics are hidden behind those behaviours.

With the first, you will learn that we play constantly and unconsciously one of these three roles: Victim, Persecutor and Savior. Together, we will see how these roles are all harmful to the dynamics of the team. After learning how to identify these roles, we'll see how we can respond to someone who is playing.

With the second model we will learn that amongst our five senses, we use one favourite channel to learn and communicate. We will learn to identify our own favorite channel and we will discover that it is not the same for everyone. Then we will discuss how to adapt our communication with someone having a different channel than ours.

After this session, you will have enough knowledge to actually use and try those tools at your working place, during your coaching sessions or your trainings. Moreover each of these concepts will be linked to concrete Agile Methods.

Do you want to know more about one sense to rule them all, do you want to learn to leave your superman costume in the closet?
Come and join us.

Speakers
avatar for Bruno Sbille

Bruno Sbille

CST, Trainer, Coach, ELLIBS
I'm a Trainer (CST, Agile, Soft Skills) and a Coach (Agile, Life Coach) | | I've been in IT and Business consultancy since 1999. In addition to my project management experience, since 2006 I had the opportunity to discover a lot of new "things" to put in my "toolbox": Scrum, Agile but also NLP, coaching, people management, creativity techniques... | | I'm passionate about "making things happen". I Blog regularly in English and... Read More →


Wednesday August 7, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Governors E

2:00pm

Adding Customer Insights into your Agile Process (Jennifer Fraser, Ayesha Khan)
Limited Capacity seats available

If you are trying to create a great user experience with your software then you need to stop thinking about user requirements. At least, you need to stop thinking about it the way most companies who build software do. You need to think about User Perspective. Thinking about software from a user's perspective gives you insight and empathy. There may be thousands of ways to match user requirements that talk about how the machine behaves, but there's probably only a few ways to create the software that represents true insight into what the user needs and what their experience has to feel like for it to be a success.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Fraser

Jennifer Fraser

Director of Design, Macadamian
I am a designer because I want to help people by making products easier for them to use. After more than fifteen years working as an Interaction Designer, I have designed products for many different target markets, including: creative professionals; large government agencies; and owners of small offices and home offices. I have also had the opportunity to work closely with various technology partners, such as Microsoft, Samsung and Blackberry, to... Read More →


Wednesday August 7, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Canal E

2:00pm

Lightning Talks - Technology

Moderators
avatar for Michael Sahota

Michael Sahota

Guide & Certified Enterprise Coach, Agilitrix (Independent Consultant)
I believe people deliver astounding results when they have Passion and Purpose. Joy and Meaning. Creativity, Safety, Trust and Belonging. I believe we can foster work environments where people can grow and evolve to unleash their best every day. | | I help people cultivate their organizational culture. To invite a more conscious way of being and relating. To evolve organizational structures and practices that foster new ways of working... Read More →

Wednesday August 7, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Canal A

2:00pm

Dev to Ops and Ops to Dev--How DevOps changes everything (Karthik Gaekwad)
Limited Capacity seats available

DevOps is radically changing the way organizations deliver software, but what about organizations where the ops and dev teams feel like they are far away from being able to influence the product? In this environment, operations teams are focused on supporting product features that have been written by a throw-it-over-the-wall style development team and they feel the best they can do is put out fires. Development teams are also at a loss in this type of organization because they feel like they have no insight into how their code runs and no control over the customer experience with features being released weeks or even sometimes months after they are complete.

In 2009, shortly after 'DevOps' was coined, our organization adopted DevOps as our approach to delivering software as a service. At that point we would have adopted anything if we thought it would help and to our surprise DevOps changed everything. Our talk focuses on our experiences working in DevOps teams over the last 4 years in several organizations and our goal is to give you pragmatic practices we have seen work firsthand. The goal is to have you walk away with knowledge to begin your DevOps journey or if you are already doing DevOps, to improve it.

DevOps is often championed in organizations where the end product is software-as-a-service--and for good reason as it directly impacts customers but even if you aren’t in the software-as-a-service business devops can transform how you deliver products. This talk walks through how to transform any team into a DevOps team. We will address how Ops influences Dev teams and how Dev influences Ops teams, however it can't stop there--we will show you how to involve test, product management, security and even customers into your DevOps revolution.

Speakers
avatar for Karthik Gaekwad

Karthik Gaekwad

Senior Engineer, StackEngine
I'm an experienced software engineer with a passion to quickly design and develop cloud hosted, web software products. I enjoy writing API's and user interfaces. I live in Austin, Texas and I'm an organizer for Devopsdays Austin, Container Days, and CloudAustin.


Wednesday August 7, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Bayou E

2:00pm

Agile in the Federal Space: The Power of Iterative & Collaborative Work (Omar Silver)
Limited Capacity seats available

A long-standing business standard for software development, the Waterfall method, assumes that project steps can be completed sequentially and all costs, benefits, and work can be calculated in advance. However, most IT organizations struggle to meet these prerequisites, thus lessening Waterfall’s effectiveness. As more and more IT organizations realize Waterfall’s limitations, new iterative software development and management methodologies under the banner of Agile are rapidly emerging as a viable alternative. In 2010, one of Dovel’s Federal clients required the company to switch from Waterfall to Agile. In response, Dovel created its own easily adaptable, development process that promoted an iterative and collaborative Agile approach while satisfying the standards of a Federal SDLC.

Speakers
avatar for Omar Silver

Omar Silver

Program Director, Dovel Technologies
Mr. Silver is a leader in the area of delivery methodology and practice and has ushered development and maturation of the Dovel Agile approach for Federal Government customers. Silver has worked on the FDA Emergency Operational Network, Incident Management (EON IMS) since joining Dovel in 2010 and has overseen the successful implementation of Dovel’s Agile methodology within that program. Silver has over 15 years of experience delivering... Read More →


Wednesday August 7, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Canal B

2:00pm

Enterprise Agility - A Practical De-Mystification (Jean Tabaka, Hendrik Esser)
Limited Capacity seats available

Agile is well understood and practiced in the R&D units of many enterprises. As the agile approach yields success stories in R&D, other parts of an enterprise have become interested in, or in fact pulled into, applying these Agile principles and practices. The struggle is that agility is neither well-defined nor understood at an enterprise level, i.e. outside of R&D. Despite this challenge, non-R&D teams in these enterprises have started to try agile approaches. Why? Because these organizations want to pay more attention to delivering value to their customers. Agile seems like a good approach for that. However, many enterprises struggle because there is no overall framework gluing different parts of an agile enterprise together. For enterprises to achieve agility, they need practices outside of R&D. They need structural components for the necessary vertical decision framework. And, they need to be attentive to the cultural challenges.

In this session, we bring a holistic view of enterprise agility and provide perspectives to the following questions:

- How does an Agile Enterprise create a flow of value from the customer through the enterprise and back to the customer?

- What structures for decision making are needed to support the end-to-end flow of value? How do they connect different parts of the enterprise?

- What characteristics are the foundation of the Agile Enterprise in terms of its cultural principles and values?

- What strategy and method can be used to kick-off and lead an enterprises transformation towards agility?

Through our personal experiences in a variety of successful and unsuccessful enterprise agile transformations, we will bring our enterprise insights to attendees.

Speakers
avatar for Hendrik Esser

Hendrik Esser

VP, Operations and Programs, Ericsson
Growing up in the 1980s, Hendrik was passionate computer game developer and active in a computer club giving programming lessons. After getting his diploma in Electrical engineering he started at Ericsson as a SW developer and grew into technical coordination and System Development roles. A broad interest in people and management of large organizations brought him into management roles, starting as a project manager, later heading Systems- and... Read More →
avatar for Jean Tabaka

Jean Tabaka

Agile Fellow, CA
Hey all! I'm excited to be joining everyone here. I continue to be passionate about the ways that we can apply Agile principles and values to extend humaneness in how we work. Being able to bring my passion into my 13,000 person organization is exciting and daunting. But when you work with amazing people who want to do the right thing, why wouldn't you want to give it your best? My good ol' conviction in the power of facilitation and... Read More →


Wednesday August 7, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Delta D

2:00pm

Organizational Learning with Open Space (Daniel Mezick, Mark Katz)
Limited Capacity seats available

A truly successful Agile adoption generates tremendous levels of team and organizational learning. Attend this session if you want real success with your Agile adoption by generating tremendous levels of socially-constructed LEARNING at the enterprise (system) level.

This session teaches how to use Open Space Technology (OST) as it is intended to be used: as a tool for transforming your organization. Contrary to popular belief, OST is not for education in conferences. It is specifically designed for generating authentic and lasting LEARNING transformations in organizations. Open Space is a tool for transforming ENTERPRISES.

This session describes how to leverage Open Space to strongly support success in ANY Agile adoption. The session is based on real Agile coaching engagements employing Open Space for enabling Agile adoptions in various organizations from 2009 to 2012.

The ideal audience is project sponsors, executives and those who coach them. NOTE: An understanding of Open Space is assumed. Ideally you have attended an Open Space event before attending this session.

This session explains the strong link between grief, grieving and organizational change. The model explained in this session specifically links griefwork with transitions in organizations, such as Agile adoption. According to this change model, all of the transition is grief and follows a predictable pattern. Organizations can get stuck in some phases of this progression.

Open Space is usually experienced in a diluted form, which is the common form in public “Open Space” events intended for mere education. Genuine Open Space for processing anxiety in organizations and includes careful choice of theme, substantial planning and socialization of the meeting, full proceedings, and more. Open Space is a tool for getting a group of people through a substantial LEARNING transformation.

This is more than a theoretical session. TWO specific organizational case studies are presented and explained. There is a lot of depth here; 90 minut

Speakers
avatar for Mark Katz

Mark Katz

Chief Information Officer, ASCAP


Wednesday August 7, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Bayou D

2:00pm

Questions not Stories: Experiment to improve business value (Adrian Howard)
Limited Capacity seats available

User Stories are a fantastic agile tool, but they are not the only way for the product owner and team to reach a mutual understanding of what needs to be delivered.

This workshop explores the use of hypotheses and experiments from the Lean Startup community as an alternative to user stories.

We examine ways for agile teams to reframe stories *(e.g. As a traveller I want to know the weather so that I can plan my journey)* as a series of hypothesis
*(e.g. Supplying weather information will increase ticket sales)* that are validated by experiments *(e.g. Does supplying hard-coded weather data for our two most popular routes increase ticket sales?)*.

Having the whole team involved in discovering business value ensures alignment across the organisation. You will see how using hypotheses and experiments brings advantages to the development team, the customer, and the user - ensuring we only build valuable features.

Stop telling stories about your product - start asking questions.

Speakers
avatar for Adrian Howard

Adrian Howard

Quietstars
Adrian Howard is passionate about building effective teams and great products. He co-founded Quietstars to help organisations do that using Lean, Agile and User Experience practices. | | You'll find Adrian working with startup and product development teams — doing everything from coaching & teaching to hands on user experience & development work | | With more than fifteen years experience working with startups, established businesses... Read More →


Wednesday August 7, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Governors A

2:00pm

Ways to keep learning from experience, despite project pressures (Prabhakar Karve)
Limited Capacity seats available

Agile encourages and provides opportunities to keep learning from experience. However, short iterations create continuous pressure to keep delivering the working software. Enhanced visibility also robs any possibility of having hidden buffers to think, explore, discuss and learn. If you have experienced this and feel frustrated because you are caught in the present ways of working, then this session is for you.

Working with our project teams, I realized that there are ways to overcome this challenge once we understand what stops us from learning. What I noticed is that we focus too much on time management. It is a legacy from the days of mass production and time & motion studies. With work becoming more and more white collar in nature and especially with agile approach and its emphasis on responding to change over following a plan, managing attention has become far more important. Watching our attention in action is a great habit to develop and highly beneficial while working under pressure.

Another simple but very effective tip is to keep asking what next after completing each action. We always have multiple threads running. Each thread is not a continuous chain of actions, but typically quick actions followed by pauses in between. These pauses cause our attention to be lost from many of the threads we are currently not focused on. Just asking this simple question and making sure that we know what the next action is and when we can take it is so important. I have found this to be a great habit not just at work, but in every walk of life.

Learning from experience isn’t really about problems and solutions. It is more about exceptions and opportunities. The moment we think of an exception as a problem, we are in a hurry to either defend it or accept it, closing any possibility of looking for different opportunities for change and improvement. It is important to avoid this emotional attachment. Calling it exception helps, as it is a neutral term.

There are plenty of small exceptions whi

Speakers
avatar for Prabhakar Karve

Prabhakar Karve

Director of Engineering, Impetus
When I observe and digest life’s myriad experiences, new patterns and insights emerge. I feel satisfied when I try them out in practice and share with others. When others benefit from it, even without my being aware, the insights become richer & more valuable and I experience a sense of happiness. It is who I am, pure and simple. | | In short, I find deeply satisfying work far more enjoyable than leisure time activities.


Wednesday August 7, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Governors C

2:00pm

Better Metrics for your Team (Nayan Hajratwala)
Limited Capacity full

Are you still measuring the performance of your team with Velocity, Estimates vs. Actuals, Utilization, Code Coverage, Cyclomatic Complexity, and “style violations”? Are your business stakeholders still in the dark about when they can expect new features? If so, you’re missing the boat.

The good news is that there are more powerful and reliable metrics that are cheaper to derive. Trust me, you will love these metrics and they will love you back.

During this session we'll discuss a variety of metrics, see real examples of projects they have been used on, and engage in an interactive game showing you their power and how to capture them.

You’ll walk away from this session understanding the purpose of capturing metrics, how few you actually need, and how you can apply them to your project starting on Monday.

Speakers
avatar for Nayan Hajratwala

Nayan Hajratwala

Lean / Agile Coach, Chikli Consulting
Nayan Hajratwala is the owner of Chikli Consulting. A Lean/Agile Coach with over 15 years of hands-on experience delivering software, he has significant programming experience and is a deep technologist always exploring new languages and ideas. His specialties include training software teams to increase their productivity and decrease their time-to-market while improving the quality of their product. Nayan is a speaker at many user groups and... Read More →


Wednesday August 7, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Bayou B

2:00pm

Agile Quality Scenarios: How to Be Nimble and Precise (Joseph Yoder, Rebecca Wirfs-Brock)
Limited Capacity seats available

Agile teams incrementally deliver functionality based on user stories. In the sprint to deliver features, frequently software qualities (non-functional requirements) such as security, scalability, performance, and reliability are overlooked. Often these characteristics cut across many user stories. Trying to deal with certain system qualities late in the game can be difficult, causing major refactoring and upheaval of the system’s architecture. This churn isn’t inevitable. Especially if you adopt a practice of identifying those characteristics key to your system’s success, writing quality scenarios and tests, and delivering on these capabilities at the opportune time.

We will show how to write Quality Scenarios in an Agile manner that emphasize architecture capabilities such as usability, security, performance, scalability, internationalization, availability, accessibility and the like. We will also address the when, where, and how on Quality Scenarios. This will include how to identify, profile, and outline the relevant quality characteristics. This workshop will be hands-on; we present some examples and follow with an exercise that illustrates how you can look at a system, identify, and then write and test quality scenarios.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

President, Wirfs-Brock Associates
I'm best known as the "design geek" who invented Responsibility-Driven Design and the xDriven meme. I'm also keen about team effectiveness, communicating complex requirements, software quality, pragmatic TDD, and techniques for architecting and reducing risk on agile projects and programs. I'm a slow jogger... if anyone is interested in early morning runs while at Agile 2014 it'd be fun to meet and go on a run.
avatar for Joseph Yoder

Joseph Yoder

Agilist, Computer Scientist, Consultant, Object Oriented Developer, ..., The Refactory, Inc (www.refactory.com)
Joseph Yoder is a founder and principle of The Refactory, Inc., a company focused on software architecture, design, implementation, consulting and mentoring on all facets of software development. Joseph is an international speaker and pattern author, a long standing member of the ACM, and also a long standing member and president of The Hillside Group (a group dedicated to improving the quality of all facets of software development). Joseph is... Read More →


Wednesday August 7, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Delta B

2:00pm

The Ideation Framework: Develop and Validate New Ideas Before Coding (Eli Bozeman, Josh Wexler)
Limited Capacity filling up

While nearly everyone would agree that continuous innovation is essential to a sustainable business, many organizations are reluctant to invest in new ideas because of the risk and cost associated with development. What's needed is a way to quickly and clearly communicate new ideas so that you and your team can achieve clarity before coding.

We have developed the Ideation Framework, a rapid prototyping and validation process that will take an idea from discussion to a validated concept. This workshop will consist of a series of exercises that will guide participants through the discovery of a problem, visualization of a solution and validation of the idea.

The result of this process is a clear, shared vision of the solution that has been validated by your customer. Through your learning, you may also begin to realize that you need to pivot your vision and attempt the process on a new solution. Your development team will gain a better understanding of the idea and can better estimate the feasibility and cost of building the application.



Wednesday August 7, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Bayou C

2:00pm

The Flow of the Agile Business Analyst (Steve Adolph, Shane Hastie)
Limited Capacity seats available

The Business Analyst role seems conspicuously absent from most Agile methods. Do Agile methods make the Business Analyst role obsolete like that of a locomotive fireman? Certainly not! But how does a BA exploit the short cycle times, and collaborative nature of Agile methods? Drawing metaphorically and literally from Donald Reinersten’s principles of product development flow, this workshop introduces 5 principles for the agile BA, Open the Channels, Chart the Flow, Generate Flow, Lean Out the Flow, and Bridge the Flow. First and foremost a BA is a communicator and must Open the Channels, and Chart the Flow to align all stake holders. BAs can leverage traditional tools such as use cases and other models to Generate Flow and feed user stories to fast moving agile teams. However, large backlogs of stories are wasteful and lean principles are applied to Lean Out the Flow. Finally BAs work in a complex ecosystem of mixed methods and practices, and may need to Bridge the Flow between more traditional elements of the organization and the agile teams. Fall in love with Business Analysis all over again by deliver more value without working longer hours.

Speakers
avatar for Shane  Hastie

Shane Hastie

Director, Agile Alliance / Software Education
Coach, trainer, passionate agilist from New Zealand, working for Software Education (www.softed.com) | | Member of the Agile Alliance board since 2011


Wednesday August 7, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Canal C/D

2:00pm

Where the Rubber Meets the Road: Real World Stories of Force Ranking Stuff (Todd Olson)
Limited Capacity seats available

There are many theories and models for prioritizing work for Agile organizations. Don Reinertsen has popularized the idea of create an economic model that sounds so simple for organizing and prioritizing work. However, this is often much more challenging in practices. Building an economic model is complex. There are many factors that affect prioritization including:

* Market/external factors: analyst reports, market events
* Customer feedback and deals (deal often trump generic feedback)
* Customer usage (ala Lean Startup A/B testing)
* Risky architecture stuff
* Competitive dynamics

While I wish there was a magic spreadsheet that normalized this into a single answer, I've found that this is often just as much art as it is science.

Join me where I discuss real stories about balancing these disparate sources of feedback to come up with a set of priorities.

Speakers

Wednesday August 7, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Governors D

3:45pm

Forty Years of Trying To Play Well With Others (Tim Lister)
Limited Capacity seats available

Addison-Wesley published the 3rd Edition of Peopleware: Productive Projects and Teams in June 2013. Tim Lister and Tom DeMarco wrote the 1st Edition back in 1987. 2013 is Tim’s 40th year in the business.

In his talk Tim will describe his work as a colleague, as an apprentice, as a mentor, and as a mediator.

He will describe how team dynamics have changed over the years, and how they bring new challenges to tight collaboration.


Speakers
avatar for Tim Lister

Tim Lister

Principal, Atlantic Systems Guild, Inc.
Tim Lister is a principal of the Atlantic Systems Guild, Inc., based in the New York office. He divides his time between consulting, teaching, and writing. Currently he is working on tailoring software development processes using software risk management techniques. He has been an invited speaker at the Agile Development Conference three times. Tim was a guest lecturer on software risk management at the Stanford University School of Business, and... Read More →


Wednesday August 7, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Delta B, C, D

5:30pm

Agile Alliance Members Meeting
The annual Agile Alliance Member Meetihg will be held at the Agile2013 Conference.  Members are invited to meet, hear about, and discuss Alliance business with the Agile Alliance Board of Directors.  A drink and snacks will be served.

Wednesday August 7, 2013 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Delta D

6:30pm

Sponsor Reception
Wednesday August 7, 2013 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Delta A
 
Thursday, August 8
 

8:30am

Open Jam Huddle

Not finding the session you were looking for? Want to delve deeper into a session you went to? Have an edgy or groundbreaking topic to share? Got some questions you want to discuss?

 

Then you want to come to Open Jam, where folks gather to introduce thoughts and take away ideas while building off of one another's creativity.

 

Anyone may convene an Open Jam session. They are short sessions that run throughout the day, from early in the morning, like Lean Coffee, and sometimes late into the evening! All you need to lead a session is passion and commitment.

 

We encourage interactive sessions providing opportunities to explore ideas and techniques. Sessions don't need to be formal, in fact, it's more fun if they are not!

 

So come to the Open Jam daily huddle at 8:30AM in the Jack Daniels space to choose a time slot for your session, then announce it to fellow conference participants so they can join! Feel free to tweet or promote your session using the conference hashtag #agile2013.

 

Follow @Open_Jam on Twitter for updates to what’s happening at the Open Jam track. Explore more, join Open Jam!


Thursday August 8, 2013 8:30am - 9:00am
Open Jam - Jack Daniels

9:00am

Fifty Shades of Behavior Driven Development (Richard Yu)
Limited Capacity seats available

From a software developer’s point of view, come join me for a pop-culture, restaurant and fast food referencing presentation that utilizes behavior driven development to address some of the problems we still face in an agile world.

So your team has made the transition to agile and your work is broken down into user stories. It makes perfect sense to break work down into smaller chunks, but now you're running into problems with estimation and communication. Your team is delivering value but it’s been discovered that user stories are thrashing through the analysis, development and QA processes. What is going on here?

Come a software development process with a deceiving name: behavior driven development. Behavior driven development (BDD) is a process that captures how a software system functions with sets of acceptance criteria. From a developer’s perspective this appears to be test driven development at a higher level with potential automation of those tests. However, if you take a step back and look at the bigger picture, it’s about functioning better as a team to deliver value to your clients.

We will take a look at the process of gathering standardized acceptance criteria from the perspective of the four main stakeholders in a project: the product owner, analyst, developer and QA. Teams involving more stakeholders in the grooming process can experience increased collaboration and better communication. User story estimations can bemore accurate and domain specific knowledge and terminology become ubiquitous as user stories move through the development cycle. Standard terminology propagates into software and creates living documentation within the code base. Software developers have increased productivity while creating leaner and better software with the process of TDD. These are a few advantages to BDD and there are more to explore. There are no silver bullets to anything so we will also address the disadvantages as well.

Speakers
avatar for Richard Yu

Richard Yu

Software Developer, Robert W. Baird & Co.


Thursday August 8, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Governors E

9:00am

devops - what's missing? what's next? (Andrew Clay Shafer)
Limited Capacity seats available

When the Agile manifesto was signed, the dominant delivery paradigm was software installed on the local system. There were hints of what the internet would become but the dot com bubble had just burst and most software was being shipped on shrink wrapped CDs.

In this world, system administration was a function to support the business processes. Sure, there were some systems, networks and storage problems to solve, but the primary measure of success was being able to receive and print email.

System administration, in theory and practice, stood as 'other' outside the Agile circle, left out of the party.

But... technology does not stand still. The service oriented world that we now see clearly was emerging as the manifesto was being signed. In this new world, relegating the systems to second class is not just sub-optimal, but can actually be fatal. The pressure to support highly available services created a crucible to burn away unnecessary process and elevate the theory, practice and station of system administration. If there servers aren't up, there is no software. The rise of devops as a differentiator, as the considerations of developers and operators met and aligned to become a competitive advantage.

Further, the transition to 'Infrastructure as Code' where provisioning, configuration and monitoring could all be driven by APIs, meant that a number of operational considerations start to look suspiciously like software development. Operations teams could use the larger body of knowledge, applying tools and processes born in software.

But let's not declare victory just yet...

There are still plenty of gaps. There are still unsolved cultural alignment and technical optimization issues to grapple, some made all the more apparent by the devops evolution.

This talk will walk through the evolution of Agile's influence on devops, highlighting interesting challenges and their solutions in today's understanding, then finish outlining a number of issues that remain open and unresolved from a holistic

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Clay Shafer

Andrew Clay Shafer

Clown Prince, Parvus Captus
we do what we can


Thursday August 8, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Governors C

9:00am

Balls for Africa - The Lean Startup in an African not-for-profit social enterprise (Paul Ellarby)
Limited Capacity seats available

I have been working with Alive and Kicking (www.aliveandkicking.org) for a couple of years now, and have watched them grow from a very small, single-focused organization into an enterprise that has annual revenues of around $1 million, employs almost 100 people, and affects the lives of hundreds - possibly thousands - throughout Africa.

Alive and Kicking did not know anything about lean startup techniques, yet followed this model very closely by focusing on a single aspect of their charter, and making this successful. Only at that point did they move to the second part of their brief, and then a third.

But what do they do? Their focus is three-fold - distribute sports balls (mainly soccer balls) to children in Africa to encourage engagement through play ; establish cooperative manufacturing centers that support the local community ; educate young people through their participation in sport about AIDS.

From their stitching centers Kenya, Ghana, and Zambia, they are now ready to branch-out into a more comercial venture, and I have the privilege of introducing their products, beliefs, and approach to the US market through Balls for Africa (www.ballsforafrica.org), which is a lean startup.

Things I want to get across:

Lean startup model, while formalized fairly recently, is a model that - in this instance - came directly from the people we were working with in Africa, NOT one of us so-called experts! Listen and learn - it is interesting where inspiration comes from.

The application of lean manufacturing principles can work in any environment. We are used to the Toyota Production System being used in large, repetitive manufacturing situations, but it is being employed in small, 30-person ball stitching facilities.

All soccer balls in the world are made in India or China, with the exception of some small organizations. Using lean techniques, Alive and Kicking i staking-on the large manufacturers, and making some headway by using adult workers in a cooperative environment.

Collaboration is king

Speakers
avatar for Paul Ellarby

Paul Ellarby

Principal Consultant, ThoughtWorks, Inc
My passion is helping people help themselves. This is true when I hold agile workshops where I teach teams how to help themselves in delivering software using agile and lean techniques. It is also true in my work with not-for-profit organizations, where I help them focus on their future, and help them develop plans for accomplishing their goals. And finally it is true in my recent work with Alive and Kicking, which combines a number of my... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Canal B

9:00am

Building a Powerful Agile Learning Experience (Don McGreal)
Limited Capacity filling up

Whether you are a professional trainer or trying to bring agility to your organization or team, you no doubt have encountered the difficulty in conveying agile values and principles. Learning practices and techniques is easy in comparison; You learn by doing. But how do you teach a philosophy or mindset? How do you 'do' a value?

Through trial and error, through hundreds of classes, through training thousands of agile practitioners, Gary and Don have put together a set of best practices (and not-so-best practices) for delivering powerful agile learning experiences. Participants in this session will walk away with a toolkit they can put to use the next day. The toolkit will include scenario simulations, learning games, discussion generators, reenforcement exercises, student patterns, common pitfalls, and other activities to help you get out of the way and let the learning happen.


Speakers
avatar for Don McGreal

Don McGreal

VP, training, Improving
In his role as VP of Learning Solutions at Improving Enterprises, Don McGreal is a hands-on Agile consultant and instructor.  He specializes in Agile Coaching at the enterprise and team levels within larger organizations. Don is a Scrum.org Professional Scrum Trainer who has authored and taught classes for thousands of software professionals around the globe. He is also co-founder of TastyCupcakes.org, a comprehensive collection of... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Bayou E

9:00am

Driving Through Complexity to Organizational Learning (Walt Wyckoff, Pat Reed)
Limited Capacity seats available

Our ability to learn is the ultimate measure of sustainable customer value. Imagine the value potential of an organization that understands that learning is an ongoing and creative process and can create its own future as it develops, adapts and transforms in response to the needs and aspiritations of its people. It allows people at all levels to individually and collectively increase their capacity to produce results they really care about. And ultimately, when one person in a learning organization gets smarter, everyone gets smarter.

This workshop will provide an overview of characteristics, and experiencial learning activities that are conducive to creating a Learning Organization and walk participants through the following topics, leveraginglearning stories and real life experiences (30 minutes):

1. Understand why adaptive organizational learning can be a powerful method for dealing with complexity, chaos and change to create value

2. Learn six management practices that contribute to organizaitonal learning (i.e.. understanding that learning is our most critical tool in creating customer value and assess how it fits with our organizations core value; exploring how to create a learning culture and how to align and integrate to the organizations core value along with ways to create a line of sight across the organizaition; understanding mental models and leverage multiple perspectives re: advocacy, alignment and building strong partnerships; understanding the importance of situational learning leadership, empowerment, shared decision making and accountability; exploring ways to create fluid, permeable communication channels and creating a framework for continuous learning and knowledge sharing

3. Explore ways to accelerate learning through the 70:20:10 model for optimizing organizational learning (10% classroom, 20% social, 70% experiential)

4. Review the importance of situational learning leadership, shared decision making, empowerment and accountability as key leadership skill

Speakers
avatar for Pat Reed

Pat Reed

Consultant, iHoriz
Experienced enterprise agile coach and consultant adjunct professor at UC Berkeley Agile Management Program Director on the Agile Alliance Community Leader and co-founder of PMI's Agile Community of Practice experienced Agile Executive for more than 25 years at The Walt Disney Company, Walt Disney Pictures and Television, NBC and Universal Studios, GE and Gap, Inc. 35 years teaching experience at the graduate and undergraduate levels
WW

Walt Wyckoff

Consultant, iHoriz Inc.
Agile practitioner and educator. I like to sail, am working on additional solar PV power for my house, will be one of the first owners of a Tesla Model S. I am also a scale modeler.


Thursday August 8, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Bayou B

9:00am

Lessons from space shuttle disasters for avoiding IT project disasters (John Helm)
Limited Capacity seats available

Projects die a death of 10,000 bad decisions. The result; junk bonds continue to sport a better risk adjusted return on investment. Using examples from Behavioral Economics, Decision Science and disasters such as the loss of the space shuttles, the role of poor decision making in project failures is explored. The results suggest that until decision pathologies are addressed directly, poor project performance will persist. Indeed, the poor decision to refrain from using Agile approaches when they are appropriate is all too familiar. Unbiased decision making and critical thinking can be improved by using tools and through practice. Using examples from Scrum and Agile Product Ownership several tools and techniques to help people make better decisions are presented.

Speakers
avatar for John Helm

John Helm

Principal, JHelm Associates, LLC
I am committed to improving productivity by reducing discontent through improving work and the workplace. | | Working people spend most of their waking life in the workplace; therefore, improving satisfaction at work contributes significantly to Improving satisfaction with life. While there will always be intrinsic travails, many avoidable ones are created also. | | I believe poor decisions are the root cause of most avoidable... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Governors D

9:00am

Generating Product Purpose with the Business Model Canvas (Jorgen Hesselberg)
Limited Capacity seats available

Critical characteristics of high-performing Agile teams include a clear understanding of product purpose and a deep sense of how they are creating value for the customer. This workshop addresses this concept head on by leveraging the valuable insights learned from constructing a Business Model Canvas to create a collaborative team-based understanding of the product. Developed by Alex Osterwalder, the Business Model Canvas is a low effort way of effectively describe target customers and finding ways to delight and monetize those targets without getting bogged down in detail. Through concrete examples, we'll illustrate how taking the time to develop a Business Model Canvas as a team activity aligns the team around a common goal and drives a strong sense of purpose from the inception of the value stream.

Thursday August 8, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Governors A

9:00am

Using Agile to Transform Federal IT Capabilities One Agency at a Time (Carol Macha)
Limited Capacity seats available

I will describe how embracing Agile allowed the Department of Veterans Affairs to become one of the leading IT development and delivery shops in the federal Government. I will emphasize the tremendous turnaround in on-time information technology (IT) delivery performance VA achieved through the implementation of Agile practices and using a VA specific version of Agile we call the Project Management Accountability System (PMAS). I will also share how VA’s PMAS methodology and principles are shareable to other organizations, both government and industry.

• I will begin with a description of VA’s IT organization in the 2007-2009 timeframe. It was a failing organization that was able to deliver only 30% of its projects on time.

o Project managers routinely failed to deliver capabilities on time and senior leaders did not hold them accountable

o Projects frequently got off-track and were taking longer and longer to deliver

• VA’s Office of Information and Technology (OIT) was an organization that answered yes to the following questions:

o Does your organization deliver a significant percentage of IT projects late or not at all?

o Does your organization devote time and money to projects that take years to deliver IT capabilities?

o Does your organization sustain or extend funding for IT projects that fail to deliver on time?

o Is your organization’s leadership frustrated with the current IT delivery model?

o Can your organization deliver IT capabilities early and often?

• Clearly, it was time for a return to VA’s accountability culture

o VA had to return to a culture in which it was accountable for the expenditure of its IT resources and to efficiently deliver IT capabilities needed by our country’s Veterans

o Office of Information and Technology (OIT) senior leaders wanted a project management methodology that reinvigorated accountability and embraced agile practices in daily execution

• VA returned to accountability by using Agile practices to deliver IT capabi

Speakers

Thursday August 8, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Canal C/D

9:00am

Doing Agile Programming Better (James Newkirk)
Limited Capacity seats available

For a number of years the focus of many sessions at the conference has been to get teams to adopt agile programming practices. This has yielded in many cases great results. However, in some cases once teams get past the initial honeymoon period they run into real issues with applying the programming practices on real projects. What happens when your teams hit that wall? Will they revert back to their previous ways or will they push forward.

 

The goal of this session is to talk about the issues that programmers have run into applying the agile programming practices and provide creative ways around these roadblocks.

Speakers
avatar for James Newkirk

James Newkirk

VP of Service Engineering, CenturyLink Cloud
As Tier 3's vice president of engineering, James oversees the development of Tier 3's cloud management platform. He brings almost 30 years experience in the software industry. Prior to Tier 3, James held senior leadership roles at Microsoft, Caradigm (GE/Microsoft Joint Venture) and ThoughtWorks. Earlier in his career he co-founded Object Mentor Inc with Robert C. Martin, a consulting firm that specialized in training and mentoring their... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Delta D

9:00am

A Hands-On Introduction to Exploratory Testing (Matthew Heusser, Claire Moss)
Limited Capacity seats available

Consisting of simultaneous test design, execution, reporting and learning, Exploratory Testing done well can be a powerful tool in any team member's arsenal. Done poorly, it can create confusion without adding much value. In this hands-on introduction, attendees will bring a laptop, pair with a buddy, hear a little theory, and then get to testing. We'll have some more theory, then test a second application, then a third - then conduct a retrospective to talk about how these techniques can combine to improve coverage of the application, reducing time-to-done, and allow teams to compress testing into iterations, sprints, and other timeboxes.

The theory element of the class will include quick attacks and consistency heuristics, two ways to generate test ideas when time is tight and information limited.

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Heusser

Matthew Heusser

Principal Consultant, Excelon Development
Matt has deep experience in software testing, project management, development, writing, and systems improvement. His extensive network of contacts in these fields has enabled him to put together a diversified, high-level team of experts at Excelon. | | In 2006, Matt was lead organizer for the initial Great Lakes Software Excellence Conference, a regional event that continues today. He organized the Agile-Alliance Sponsored Workshop on the... Read More →
avatar for Claire Moss

Claire Moss

Agile Tester, VersionOne
Software testing speaker, workshop facilitator, author, and blogger. Agile software tester working closely with product development team. I help teams to craft more testable user stories. Testing teacher, unit and integration test review and advisement, exploratory testing coach. Exploratory tester and test automator. | Claire Moss has always had a passion for writing, which might be a strange trait for a discrete mathematician, but that... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Bayou A

9:00am

Technical Debt Meets Agile (Israel Gat)
Limited Capacity seats available

Proponents of Agile software methods often emphasize higher productivity and shorter time to market as two major benefits. For new code bases that are not over-burdened with technical debt, it is indeed fairly straightforward nowadays to attain both benefits. The story is very different, however, when teams embrace Agile methods in the face of significant level of technical debt. The debt often outweighs methodical progress made through adopting Agile.

To effectively service debt, one needs to ensure that technical debt stories in the Agile backlog would not become ‘second class citizens.’ To that end, we propose treating technical debt as a strategic investment theme. To our way of thinking, technical debt is no different from customary budget allocations to growing market segments, tactical sales opportunities, cost reduction initiatives and the like.

The key to success in implementing technical debt reduction under a strategic investment theme ‘umbrella’ is rigorous integration of technical debt reduction techniques in the Agile method. This kind of rigor requires intentionality at two levels:
1. Forward looking backlog management that fully takes into account the long-term consequences of technical debt.
2. Ruthless operational discipline that is ready to ‘stop the line’ whenever technical debt levels get significantly out of line.

Like it or not, sooner or later you will have to service your technical debt. The techniques proposed in this presentation will enable you to implement a disciplined manner of paying back your debt.


Speakers
IG

Israel Gat

Practice Director, Agile Product & Project Management, Cutter Consortium
Dr. Israel Gat is a Cutter Consortium Fellow and Director of the Agile Product & Project Management practice, a Fellow of the Lean Systems Society, and a member of the Trident Capital SaaS advisory board. He is recognized as the architect of the agile transformation at BMC Software where, under his leadership, Scrum users increased from zero to 1,000, resulting in nearly three times faster time to market than industry average and 20%-50... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Delta B

9:00am

Creating mobile strategies based on empathy (David Peter Simon)
Limited Capacity seats available

I believe in the power of software as a tool for social change. But apps won’t change the world. People will.

In this session, you'll hear a global software delivery story about how we used agile principles and practices to build Amnesty International an app in India and conduct user research in Kenya. My report is a multi-stakeholder story about crafting strategies based on human empathy and understanding. I'll be sharing how techniques like customer journey mapping, user-test driven development and continuous design helped us investigate an ill-defined problem and posit the simplest solution. I’ll be focusing on the human factors techniques we used to understand human rights activists’ needs, and elaborate how this agile approach is valuable when thinking about creating tools that need to scale. Everyone can gain insight from the unique challenges that the non-profit, NGO, and social enterprise space faces. Attendees will learn how these project's insights can be applied to any sort of product development, and how anyone can use these sort of design insights in a project lifecycle.

We'll then focus on outcomes over outputs in an interactive workshop at the intersection of user experience and business strategy. My aim is to equip participants with practical takeaways to tackle their projects differently. We will talk about a wicked problem using a design thinking approach, and see how it integrates with agile software development methodologies.

This is an opportunity to move your good idea forward and have some fun with agile. Think of it like Lean Startup Machine for social design - in 55 minutes or less. The focus is to see how we can find a viable idea through gamestorming and similar activities, then how we'd funnel that into generative user research for next-step validation and lo-fi prototyping.

Participants will learn challenges faced when trying to kickstart an innovation strategy globally, and how to adapt a process from discovery to development that allows you to analyse a problem and fit the answer to the context.



Thursday August 8, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Bayou D

9:00am

Mo' Solutions, Mo' Problems (Tami Evnin)
Limited Capacity seats available

Solutions are the death of a product design. Learn how Tami Evnin helped to disrupt a large, product-focused organization with design, through not only educating product owners, but including them in the exploration to define problems instead of solutions.

A small but growing internal design team within a large product-focused organization has had a strong voice in the development process of our company’s client-facing products. As with any change in process, growing pains were inevitable. Instead of making cosmetic changes to old, unvetted solutions, we challenged our team to find problems that needed solving in order to create a better overall product. We introduced research methods, design studio, and rapid prototyping into our colleagues’ vocabularies early and often. Even through a series of discouraging review sessions and a multitude of poorly worded email critiques, our team came to trust and understand that our design strategy got us to the heart of our users’ needs.

I will talk *process* - the team, communication, and validating big questions and ideas; *failures* - mismanaged agile processes and unactionable critique; and *how we are moving onward and upward* - team sketching sessions and other design studio methods, communication improvements, and productive sprint planning.

Speakers
avatar for Tami Evnin

Tami Evnin

Product Designer, NASDAQ OMX


Thursday August 8, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Canal E

9:00am

Evolving Agile Contracts Through Validated Learning (Steve Holyer, Nancy Van Schooenderwoert)
Limited Capacity seats available

A Scrum Master, an Entrepreneur and a Lawyer walked into a bar …

...and said 'Agile Contracting is no joke, we need to use legal contracts and business models to deal with the business world and NOT undermine the spirit of Agile and the future we are trying to create.'

Then we formed a working group to look at real world contracting issues. We wanted to treat real-world examples of agile contracting like experiments and try to validate the effectiveness of contracts across several key dimensions including: collaboration, risk, and pre-contracting activity.

Contract negotiation is your first chance to delight the customer. Successful contracting delights the customer by actually introducing them to and involving them in the agile process. The successful (or delightful?) contract must support that.

Issues with contracts and Agile teams are tightly bound up with their context - with the people, the risks, the trust levels existing between the entities. Rather than try to understand contracting from the top down or from the general to the specific, we are starting with a live ones - real life situations happening now.

This session takes you along as we discuss what happened with our first encounter with a live one, what we discovered and what resulted from our advice and experiments with the contract.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Holyer

Steve Holyer

Principle Consultant (and Indie-label Coach), Engage-Results.com
Steve Holyer is an experienced trainer, coach, facilitator and consultant helping organisations unleash value and produce results. He is also a frequent international speaker on Scrum and Agile software development. He serves as advocate and mentor for companies, leaders and change agents looking for a better way of working using Agile practices in a productive, fulfilling, and fun way. | | From international Swiss business to emerging... Read More →
avatar for Nancy Van Schooenderwoert

Nancy Van Schooenderwoert

President, Lean-Agile Partners, Inc.
Two key interests: Agile Engineering, Agile Contracts. | | I'm interested in bringing Agile and Lean ideas to engineering disciplines beyond software - especially where it matters most: safety-critical products that simply HAVE TO WORK. Been doing this for many years; now seeing a big increase in demand for it. If you're an EE, ME or other engineer wanting to be Agile, let's talk! | | Boundaries between companies get in the way of trust... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Canal A

9:00am

MCA: A simple Technique for Prioritizing the Product Backlog (Geri Winters)
Limited Capacity filling up

A simple, effective technique I learned from hydrological engineers on a software project in Africa can dramatically ease your work of prioritizing stories and make it easier to get funding for your projects. This technique, called Multi-Criteria Analysis (MCA), is being used today to help over 30 stakeholders in the 9 riparian countries of the Nile region make cooperative decisions about the use of the water of the Nile. It is equally effective in our corporate environments.

In this session, I talk about different criteria we should consider when prioritizing user stories, including corporate goals, the vision for the direction of the product, and the needs of the customer. These criteria are often in competition; Multi-Criteria Analysis is a technique for resolving conflicts of interest in such a way that all stakeholders know that their voice is heard and their needs understood. MCA replaces a gut-level feeling for what the priorities should be with a scientific process for making decisions. It also ensures the needs of all the stakeholders are heard. Finally, I will discuss how to use MCA to: choose one solution from a list of possible solutions, prioritize a product backlog, and make a strong project proposal. The presentation material is woven throughout a facilitated workshop where we learn MCA by doing it.

In the facilitated workshop we will all be stakeholders reaching agreement on the priorities for a set of user stories. The user stories will be provided; our task will be to use MCA to reach agreement on the priorities of the stories. This hands-on experience allows us to implement the knowledge gained from the presentation. You will leave the session with an effective tool for making cooperative decisions in your company.


Speakers
avatar for Geri Winters

Geri Winters

President/CEO, Lead Consultant, Wyyzzk, Inc.
When not being consulted for large scale Agile implementations or executive strategies, I can be found pursuing one of my other passions: Directing Musicals, Hypnosis, Direct Marketing, and - with my husband - mentoring young women in STEM, particularly our all girls FRC Robotics Team: Girls of Steel. FIRST Robotics rocks!


Thursday August 8, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Bayou C

10:45am

Agile ALM – A horror/feel good/fantasy story (Dave West)
Limited Capacity seats available

Application Lifecycle Management (ALM) is described as the application of business management to the practice of software delivery unifying the practices of management, requirements, development, test and release into an integrated lifecycle. ALM is traditionally connected to tools and thus for many Agile advocates is in direct contradiction to the principles of Agility. But, as Agile becomes mainstream and scales to teams of teams the application of traditional business management and tools to the practice of Agility is crucial. Agility must move out of the Agile ghetto to embrace rather than shun ALM. It is time to consider flow and transparency, the key tenants of ALM in the context of Agile. In this talk Dave West, chief product officer of Tasktop and former Forrester Analyst describes what Agile ALM looks like and how organizations need to concentrate on the manufacturing process of software delivery and maintenance. Introducing an end to end, tool and practice based approach that supports rapid feedback, improved flow and management discipline.

In this talk Dave will cover the following points :-

• The challenge of Agile ALM
• Why ALM is a great friend to enterprise Agile
• Customer case studies and examples
• What it means to you

Speakers
avatar for Dave West

Dave West

Chief Product Officer, Tasktop
Dave West is the Chief Product Officer at Tasktop. In this capacity, he engages with customers and partners to drive Tasktop’s product roadmap and market positioning. As a member of the company’s executive management team, he also is instrumental in building Tasktop into a transformative business that is driving major improvements in the software industry. As one of the foremost industry experts on software development and deployment... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Governors C

10:45am

LEGO TDD and Refactoring (Bryan Beecham)
Limited Capacity full

In this fun and energetic session, we will learn the basics of Test Driven Design/Development (TDD) through the use of LEGO. We will create failing tests, make them pass and then refactor. We won't be writing software, we will be using LEGO bricks. By working with our hands, these technical concepts that can be tricky to wrap your head around will be simplified.


Speakers
avatar for Bryan Beecham

Bryan Beecham

Developer, Fusebill
Developer, Speaker, HumanRefactor Guide, Guitarist. | Interested in improvement of self and code.


Thursday August 8, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Bayou D

10:45am

Enabling a DevOps culture through building an in-house PaaS offering. (Brandon Burton)
Limited Capacity seats available

Providing Infrastructure to a variety of application and web developers, which ultimately serves the needs of 450+ million plus end users is tricky at best. Needs in terms of environments, monitoring, support, and SLAs varies from product to product and group to group, and Mozilla IT does its best to service them all.

To help scale Mozilla's web operations team and enable more self-service opportunities for the developer teams they support, the web operations team begin participating in Mozilla Labs' Project Petri initiative, which was formed in late 2011 to help integrate ideas and practices from cloud computing, specifically the goal of providing a Platform-as-a-service (PaaS) offering to make it easy for people with new ideas for web apps to try them quickly, with minimal impact on IT/Ops, and with an on-ramp to making webapps that are better/safer/faster/more maintainable if the ideas they're testing prove to be useful.

Late 2011 and early 2012 were spent exploring various options and Q3 2012 saw us chose ActiveState's Stackato as the foundation of our in-house PaaS. Q1 2013 will see us launch our in-house PaaS into a developer beta with a goal of hosting production web applications in Q2.

Our talk with provide a brief history of Mozilla's challenges, how we arrived at the decision to use the technologies we have, and explore some of our experiences in trying to create a culture that embodies DevOps through self-service tools, documentation, sharing, and more.

Speakers

Thursday August 8, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Canal C/D

10:45am

Scaling with Feature vs. Component Teams (Kenny Rubin)
Limited Capacity filling up

Using agile with one team and one product backlog is straightforward. But, how do we scale to support larger products/projects that involve more people than can reasonably fit on a single team? Most agile practitioners recommend scaling with feature teams--cross-functional and cross-component teams that can pull end-customer features from the product backlog and complete them. Most large organizations prefer scaling with component teams--teams that focus on the development of a component or subsystem that can be used to create only part of an end-customer feature. Given the diversity of organizations and the work that they do, it would be naive to assume that one type of team is always superior to another in all situations. In this session I describe and then apply an economic framework for making informed tradeoffs when considering whether to scale with component teams, feature teams, or a blended model. By considering the economic consequences of our choices, we can address multi-team waste and better achieve the fast, flexible flow of features while maintaining the integrity of core components.

Speakers
avatar for Ken Rubin

Ken Rubin

Managing Principal, Innolution
Ken Rubin is Managing Principal at Innolution, a company that provides Scrum and agile training and coaching to help companies develop products in an effective and economically sensible way. A Certified Scrum Trainer, Ken has trained over 22,000 people on agile and Scrum, Kanban, Smalltalk development, managing object-oriented projects, and transition management. He has coached over 200 companies, ranging from start-ups to Fortune 10. Ken was... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Bayou E

10:45am

The Pain and the Joy ...what happened when we committed to Agile (Sarah Lumbard)
Limited Capacity seats available

At NPR Digital Media, we¹d tried Agile on the cheap -- do it yourself, learn from your mistakes, go for it -- and we hit the wall. We wanted
more. We wanted to provide the teams with the luxury of focus that would deliver amazing audience experiences and we got more than we bargained
for.

This presentation is the story that begins when two executives, one leading technology and the other leading product, asked their direct reports ³do we really want to do agile? Are we ready to singly dedicated teams and leave them whole?² and their direct reports answered ³yes².
That was in April of 2010. What followed was coaching and more coaching for 25 people together: management, UX, Design, programmers, QA, and
product owners. What followed: beautiful product, executive discomfort, management discomfort (what is my team doing? How do I know what their
doing? I want to approve everything); constant reworking of how we work (new meetings, different meeting, new release cycles); failed and successful external vendor and contractor work (in that order); odd conversations with finance on capitalization (we don¹t know what we¹re
going to build); losing and regaining of faith in agile and more coaching; why a few champions are critical to keeping the faith because it waivers; our long road to executives embracing failing fast; how we learned to bring others into the fold; the looks in the elevator when we
talked about agile; and, the moments of success when agile seeped into other working group outside of Digital and into Communications for crisis
management; Progamming to develop a new radio program; and, the Library for everything.

And, we'll never be done.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Lumbard

Sarah Lumbard

VP, Content Strategy & Operations, NPR


Thursday August 8, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Canal B

10:45am

How We Successfully Adapted Agile for a Research-Heavy Engineering Software Team (Alfred Lorber, Kyran Mish)
Limited Capacity seats available

In our development team at Sandia National Laboratories we have honed our Scrum processes to where we continually deliver high-performance engineering analysis software to our customers. We deliver despite our non-ideal circumstances, which include development work that can be categorized as scientific research, part-time developers, changing team size, highly specialized skill sets and a broad range of deliverables.

In this talk we will discuss how we create and prioritize our product backlog, write our user stories, calculate our capacity, plan our sprints, report our results and communicate our progress. This talk is for you if you work in a heavily research-oriented environment such as that found in a government laboratory, academic institution or corporate research facility. If you are considering using Lean/Agile for your project in one of these environments, or have started and are encountering problems, we encourage you to come learn from our experiences.

Some of our non-traditional approaches include writing our User Stories in a way that recognizes the realities of research, arriving at the Planning Meeting with a Starting Point for Negotiations instead of simply a prioritized backlog, running a Task Based Daily Standup and running a Review meeting that is more like an Apple Keynote Address than a demo to users. We found that many of these changes were needed to address the culture of our developers, namely Ph.D. Engineers who were trained in a heavily individual-based atmosphere.

We are the Scrum Master and Product Owner of a large software development team that writes applications used for engineering analysis at Sandia National Laboratories. Our team writes scalable C++ applications that use numerical simulation of natural phenomena to model the physical environment encountered by nuclear weapon delivery systems. This is done by solving the mathematical equations that govern heat conduction and radiation, air flow, fire and other physical phenomena.

Speakers
avatar for Alfred Lorber

Alfred Lorber

Scrum Master/Agile Coach, Sandia National Laboratories
Spreading the goodness of Lean/Agile throughout Sandia National Laboratories. | | I've been a Scrum Master on various teams for the last 5 years and over the last 1-1/2 years I have been coaching many new teams, starting them off with kickoff meetings and mentoring them as they start off. | | My specialty is working in the strong research environment at Sandia and heterogeneous teams. At Sandia many teams are made up of developers with... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Canal E

10:45am

Developing Effective Training Using Agile Values (Marian Willeke)
Limited Capacity seats available

Come and gain insights for creating and delivering effective courses in a systemic fashion so that you are not constantly re-writing or re-inventing the wheel. This session fits the individual who trains, coaches, or facilitates regularly, and would like a process that ensures a fantastic learning experience without killing a weekend preparing. While learning the theoretical underpinnings of motivating and instilling a sense of responsibility in the learners, you will develop practices to keep your course roadmap relevant to your audience. This session is also valuable for individuals in high-learning cultures that desire strategies to improve the effectiveness of time spent learning.

The course development experience offered in this session is based on an agile-inspired methodology where implementation in other environments increased productivity and improved motivation. Scrum was studied, dissected, and reassembled for the needs of systemic course development. This, in turn, provides more time for adding new dimensions to courses and options for the course facilitators or coaches to use based on the immediate need of the audience.

Speakers
avatar for Marian Willeke

Marian Willeke

Director, Adaptive Learning
My passion is centered around ensuring effective learning experiences that improve people's lives. Developing a learning mindset is my ultimate goal whether working with academic programs or corporate training; formal or informal learning practices. It is my belief that our potential for agility is limited only by our capacity for learning.


Thursday August 8, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Bayou B

10:45am

The Art of Agile Practice (Thomas Perry)
Limited Capacity seats available

In theory there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is. -Yogi Berra

You can talk all you want about practice, but ultimately it all boils down to the doing. Practice well and you can achieve world class expertise in almost any domain you desire. Practice poorly and you only perpetuate an endless cycle of going through the motions with only minimal improvement, if any. Through the research of Anders Ericsson and others there is compelling evidence to suggest that practice matters more than intelligence, more than experience, more than any kind of innate skill. Practice, when done well, is perhaps the single most important and reliable predictor of mastery in any field.

If that is true, then we should all be extremely passionate about learning how to practice our discipline well. Perhaps you want to become an outstanding developer. Maybe your interest lies more with the soft skills, like facilitation. It might even be that you strive to be an outstanding leader. The question is: how do you practice?

In this tutorial, we will explore the techniques you can use to practice and hone your skills as a developer, tester or team leader. From individual exercises through collaborative games, we will explore how we can improve the way we practice both individually and as a team.

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Perry

Thomas Perry

Sr. Principal Transformation Coach, CA
Tom has been working in software development for over 20 years. He has worked on teams at startup companies, large corporations in the Fortune 100 and the State and Federal Government. His background includes testing, development, project/program management, agile coaching/mentoring and training. As part of his involvement in the greater agile community, he led the Seattle eastside chapter of the APLN. Tom speaks at a wide variety of software... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Bayou A

10:45am

De-Mystifying Kanban: Understanding Its Many Faces (Alan Shalloway)
Limited Capacity seats available

There is a lot of confusion about what Kanban is. Some of this is due to the fact that many people who have never used Kanban have been deriding it – saying it is a mechanistic team management method that doesn’t respect people. The fact that Kanban is quickly growing and gaining a reputation for success where other Agile methods have had challenges belies that categorization.

But what is Kanban? Even when listening to Kanban thought leaders one will hear different answers. 1) it’s a power agile management system based on lean-flow. 2) it’s a transition management method to assist teams to achieve continuous learning. 3) It’s a way to create visibility for executives to improve their product portfolio management. I can almost here Gilda Radner and Dan Aykroyd on Saturday Night Live describing New Shimmer!

This talk discusses how Kanban actually is a multi-faceted method that assists process, transition and collaboration. Kanban is not a mere tool, or even a set of practices. It’s a mindset that attends to people, their culture, and the systems they find themselves working in. The talk presents a few of the basics of Lean-Flow and theory of constraints that it is based on as well as some of the psychological aspects of people adopting new methods.

While this talk is intended for those considering adopting Kanban, those currently using Scrum will find it helpful as many of the principles and practices of Kanban fit well into the Scrum framework.

Speakers
avatar for Al  Shalloway

Al Shalloway

CEO, Net Objectives
Founder and CEO of Net Objectives.Co-founder of Lean-Kanban University (no longer affiliated). SPC Trainer. Co-author of 4 books on Lean, Scrum, Design Patterns and Agile Design. | Happy to talk to anyone who wants a free consult. | Also, are looking for folks who'd like to work with me at Net Objectives.


Thursday August 8, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Delta B

10:45am

Reality check for agile program managers (Susan Fojtasek, Brian Adkins)
Limited Capacity seats available

Running an agile program is hard.

We will take a pragmatic look at how agile program management might evolve over time. Unfortunately, participation in an agile project does not really prepare you for leading an agile program. We’ve been running an agile program for three years…our first delivery had 400+ participants on the various teams. Now with 3 additional deployments successfully completed, we will walk you through what has worked well, and the changes that were made to remove roadblocks that we encountered along the way.

This session will tackle the day to day challenges that you will most certainly be facing as you step into the program management role
- What kinds of decisions will you make?
- How do you influence team members when you don't have direct authority?
- When do you change directions?
- What does success look like?

It will also arm you with techniques that you can draw from to overcome these challenges. Much of the discussion will be interactive so that you are learning from your fellow participants and their experiences, as well as learning from our journey.

Speakers
avatar for Brian Adkins

Brian Adkins

Principal Agile Consultant, CA Technologies
avatar for Susan Fojtasek

Susan Fojtasek

Vice President, Consulting, Improving Enterprises


Thursday August 8, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Governors E

10:45am

Coaching: Simple Patterns That Avoid Common Pitfalls for Scrum Teams (Jeff Sutherland)
Limited Capacity seats available

For several years now, the Scrum Patterns group (scrumplop.org) has evolved patterns seen repeatedly in Scrum that solve critical problems. I've worked on a small pattern language that, when properly implemented, gets a team off to a good start and will take an experienced team hyperproductive. These patterns are like the standard plays that make a good football team great.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Sutherland

Jeff Sutherland

CEO, Scrum, Inc.
CoCreator of Scrum


Thursday August 8, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Delta D

10:45am

7 Deadly Sins of Agile Software Test Automation (Craig Smith)
Limited Capacity filling up

Automated software testing is a key enabler for teams wanting to build high quality software that can be progressively enhanced and continuously released. To ensure development practices are sustainable, automated testing must be treated as a first-class citizen and not all approaches are created equal. Some approaches can accumulate technical debt, cause duplication of effort and even team dysfunctions.

The seven deadly sins of automated software testing are a set of common anti-patterns that have been found to erode the value of automated testing resulting in long term maintenance issues and ultimately affecting the ability of development teams to respond to change and continuously deliver.

Taking the classic seven sins (Gluttony, Sloth, Lust, Envy, Rage, Pride, Greed) as they might be applied to test automation we will discuss how to identify each automated sin and more importantly provide guidance on recommended solutions and how to avoid them in the first place.

Speakers
avatar for Craig Smith

Craig Smith

Agile Coach & Director, Unbound DNA
Craig Smith has been an Agile Practitioner, Coach and one of Australia’s premier Agile Trainers for over ten years. As a co-organiser of the Agile Brisbane Meetup Group, advisor of Agile Australia, co-chair of one of the world’s leading Agile Podcasts and an Agile Editor for InfoQ, Craig is one of Australia’s heaviest contributors to the Agile community. Craig has presented at numerous conferences including Agile 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Canal A

10:45am

SPEED Design Studio (Jabe Bloom)
Limited Capacity seats available

The Design Studio Methodology rapidly engages entire product teams in the early stages of product innovation. During this initial phase it is critical to achieve two opposing goals; Divergent Thinking and Shared Understanding. One of the exciting things about Design Studio is the rapid pace, in this workshop we're going to break the speed limits.

Participants will experience 2 rounds of differing Design Studio exercises that will allow them to explore Design Studio and Structured Creativity. These rounds will be fast iterations, allowing the participants to think with their hands. After each round the presenter will briefly explain the theory underlying the exercise, allowing participants to bring back not only the process, but and understanding thereof.

After the workshop, for those interested the presenter will reserve a Open Space session to discuss the theory that informs Design Studio. We will explore establishing a theoretical basis for the Design Studio Methodology. We'll explore both Structured Creativity and Cognitive Complexity as potential foundational theories, examining how they can support the Design Studio Methodology as it is currently practiced. Then we'll turn toward potential extensions to and modifications of The Design Studio Methodology based on these theories.

Speakers
avatar for Jabe Bloom

Jabe Bloom

President & Principle Consultant, Coherent Insight
I try to collect and tell interesting stories about the future. | | Sometimes, when the stories are are compelling enough, people use them to make interesting things. | | I am an award-winning international speaker on Lean Software and Product Development, Agile, and Lean Management. | | President and Principal Consultant at Coherent Insight, Chief Flow Officer at Praxis Flow | | Pursuing a PhD at Carnegie Mellon.


Thursday August 8, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Governors A

10:45am

Agile Culture: Tools to Delight Our Customers (Pollyanna Pixton)
Limited Capacity seats available

Even today, to the detriment of agile success, most organizational cultures remain delivery date-driven—resulting in delivery teams that are not focused on creating value for the customer. So how can we redirect stakeholders, the business, and the project team to concentrate on delivering the greatest value rather than simply meeting dates? Pollyanna Pixton describes the tools she has used in collaboration sessions to help all stakeholders and team members begin the process of adopting customer-centric agile methods. These tools include laying out an end-to-end customer journey, forming reusable decision filters to help prioritize backlogs, converting features into actionable user stories, and developing a solid process for making group decisions and communicating those decisions. Pollyanna shares questions that product owners and managers can use to define the problem while making sure they don't solve the problem. After all, that is the responsibility of the delivery team.

The goal of this process is focused on bringing meaningful thoughts and creating one shared valuable vision. However, the additional value is providing a concrete beginning of moving the culture away from date driven to value driven.

The Tools

    Customer Journey
    Too often development teams focus only on solving the problem and miss the big picture of delighting customers at each stage. Remember when you buy a product, have a problem and can't find any information on their website? So, we start with the journey a customer makes from identifying their business need, finding you as the solution, trying before buying, on-boarding, engagement including support (many times support teams need tools to troubleshoot our products - often forgotten), billing, and operations, proving value (customer loyalty indicates customer satisfaction), upgrades, and cancellation when required.


    Decision Filters
    To give the whole team ownership and avoid unwanted features creeping into the project, decision filters, frame

Speakers
avatar for Pollyanna Pixton

Pollyanna Pixton

President, Accelinnova
Pollyanna Pixton's career focus has been to help develop great leaders who bring collaboration, trust and ownership into their organizations to improve the work environment and increase productivity and innovation.


Thursday August 8, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Bayou C

10:45am

Flexible Contracts (Gabrielle Benefield, Ryan Shriver)
Limited Capacity seats available

In this step by step tutorial, presented by Agile and Lean practitioner Gabrielle Benefield, we will look at the parts of existing contracts that are no longer helpful and how they fail to enable today’s flexible software development practices.

One of the greatest problems in software, is effectively understanding what the customer needs, and translating this into a form that the team can deliver. This tutorial gives practical guidance to help the customers speak effectively to the development teams, with a contract that helps increase this bridge to communication, instead of creating another barrier.

We will show you how to create great contracts from the ground up that will effectively support your work and create happier customers and happier suppliers.

### Topics include:

**Introduction**

* Why traditional contracts increase risk, waste and cost
* The benefits of flexible contracting and how this works.

**How to create a flexible contract**

* The main framework agreement
* Statements of work beneath the framework
* Different charging models, pros, cons and recommendations

**Planning and managing the process**

* How to build an incremental contract release plan
* Effective contract metrics
* Choosing which contract metrics to use for different customers
* How to build the contract model based on the metrics chosen
* How to track and measure progress during development

*Templates and examples will be made available during the session*

Speakers
avatar for Gabrielle Benefield

Gabrielle Benefield

CEO, Evolve Beyond
I want to help people build great products that are beautifully designed. I believe in Outcomes over Outputs and being highly adaptive.
avatar for Ryan Shriver

Ryan Shriver

Enterprise Technology Director, Dominion Digital
Passionate about helping teams deliver better outcomes, not just more output.


Thursday August 8, 2013 10:45am - 12:00pm
Governors D

2:00pm

Being Followed: How Individuals Help Teams Become (Michael Hill)
Limited Capacity seats available

Do you lead when you’re not the boss, or even the senior geek? Do you wish to? Guess what: you’re a coach. Coaching is exactly the art of being followed when you’re not in charge, and in this session we’ll tackle it head-on. You’ll learn:
• the basics of coaching;
• three noob Theory Traps to avoid;
• five pillars of coaching: Sorting, Inviting, Releasing, Situating, Modeling;
• using the pillars to generate or evaluate a coaching idea;
• and innumerable details, wherein the devil resides.
The session is divided into two three short talks, each followed by q&a and discussion. Coaching is not a science, and the path to success is not obvious, so ask an experienced coach what he’s learned.

Speakers
MH

Michael Hill

Software Development Coach, geepawhill.org


Thursday August 8, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Canal C/D

2:00pm

Supporting Analysts: A Real-World Tale of Transforming a Business Analyst Skeptic (Leslie Morse)
Limited Capacity seats available

Proper Business Analysis is key to building a high performing Agile team that delivers valuable products that truly meet customer needs. Supporting Analysts will give you an insider's view of a real-world BA's transformation from an Agile skeptic to an Agile Coach . You'll be lead you through what BAs are likely thinking when they first learn about Agile and be provided with insights & strategies for building a team of analysts that are not only Agile champions, but also a driving force behind hyper-productive Agile teams.

**Supporting Analysts is a lecture-style session that will cover 5 key sections:**

*1) How Business Analysts typically derive their self worth*
- What builds a BAs self-identify
- What are the values of a typical BA culture
- How BAs perceive they fit into an organization

*2) What BAs often think when they first hear about Agile*
- Initial gut reactions from the Agile Manifesto
- Emotional resistance to how Scrum is often presented

*3) Questions and concerns a BA may never ask a Coach, ScrumMaster, or Manager*
- Fears about job security and the ability to add value
- Lack of buy-in around the process and ability to do quality work
- Differences between mature & immature analysts

*4) Topics that resonate with analysts to help them overcome resistance*
- Strategies for addressing the role of a Business Analysts
- Tactics for overcoming concerns around Business Analysis processes

*5) Key aspects of the Agile framework that play to a Business Analysts strengths*
- Important soft-skills
- Critical analytical skills

**About the Speaker:**
As a Business Analyst by trade, Leslie J. Morse has lived this. She worked as an analyst at a Fortune 50 retailer and was ultimately managing a team of 24 other very competent BAs when leadership decided to convert a 275+ eCommerce team from Waterfall to Agile. Mentally she rebelled, she didn't understand and over-engineered the role of a Business Analyst within the Agile framework, an


Speakers
avatar for Leslie Morse

Leslie Morse

Managing Director, Davisbase Consulting LLC


Thursday August 8, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Governors E

2:00pm

The Power of Focus (Jukka Lindström)
Limited Capacity seats available

*“All that we are is the result of what we have thought.” – Buddha*

Focus is a great tool that we can use to increase empowerment, direction, awareness and learning, but sadly it is not often deliberately and consciously chosen. When we focus on solutions, learning or on a future positive vision it has a huge impact on our energy learning and what we can become. Unfortunately we rather spend much of our time on 'just surviving the day' and dwelling in problems, because we don't remember that we can choose.

*Choosing* and *helping others to choose* the right focus is a fundamental skill not only for coaches and leaders, but also for parents, peers and companions. Participants will learn coaching techniques for bringing focus into conversations, workshops and longer-term goals to help others (and themselves) reach their potential.

Speakers
avatar for Jukka Lindström

Jukka Lindström

Principal Coach and Trainer, Reaktor
I'm a Principal Coach and a Trainer at Reaktor. I am very passionate about thinking and personal growth. Not just myself's :), but of others'. I love helping people to reach whatever dreams they have through facilitating their thinking. | | I've been working with topics around self-organization, leadership, coaching for years and I seem to be learning more and more things that I think are worth of sharing. We are living interesting times!


Thursday August 8, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Governors A

2:00pm

ABUSER STORIES: Thinking Like the Bad Guy to Reduce Security Vulnerabilities (Judy Neher)
Limited Capacity seats available

At Agile 2011, the speaker introduced the notion of abuser stories to in the context of an overall approach to agile security.

Abuser stories is a way to capture potential vulnerabilities in software systems, using the standard user story format. While user stories are written from a user perspective, abuser stories are written from an enemy or attacker’s perspective and describe the enemy’s mal-intent and motivation.


The session will look at the concept of Abuser Stories more in-depth. We will examine:
How seemingly benign functional user stories can create vulnerabilities in our software, leaving lots of opportunity for our enemies to take advantage of our weaknesses.
How to use the concept of abuser stories to shed some light on where these vulnerabilities can be introduced.
How to craft a good abuser story.
How to craft refutation criteria so that we can determine that the attack depicted by the abuser story is not possible.
How to estimate and rank abuser stories.

Speakers
avatar for Judy Neher

Judy Neher

President/CEO, Celerity Technical Services, Inc.
Passionate about building highly collaborative, high performing teams.


Thursday August 8, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Bayou A

2:00pm

Cleaner Development Using a Branch-per-Issue Workflow (Sarah Goff-Dupont)
Limited Capacity seats available

There's an exciting trend out there, especially among teams using distributed version control. It's called story-branching, or issue-driven development. For each issue a team implements - user story, bug, spike, technical task - a new development branch is created. Madness?! You be the judge.

Story-branching protects your master code line and encourages innovation. Transferring work in progress to other branches helps keep master in a releasable state. And working in isolation on a branch gives developers more freedom to experiment.

This session will cover two common approaches to issue-driven development, as practiced by development teams at Atlassian, including a real-world demonstration showing how automation can neutralize potential branching and merging overhead for coders. Along the way, I'll discuss how issue-driven development reduces logistical friction and helps teams deliver incremental value to their customers faster.


Thursday August 8, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Bayou E

2:00pm

The Latest in Mocks for [Legacy Embedded] C (James Grenning)
Limited Capacity seats available

Practicing TDD in C is different than in Object Oriented languages. Specifically inserting test-doubles into your code and tests cannot rely on subclassing. You need to be proficient on using every stage of the build to sneak in the test doubles. Embedded developers often face the largest challenges, as they are likely to be wed to non-standard silicon-specific compiler tool chains.

In this class we'll see the latest using the linker, preprocessor, and function pointers to break problem dependencies. We'll also look at some of the tools available like CppUMock and the Fake Function Framework to avoid the tedium of creating all your test doubles and wiring by hand.

Speakers
avatar for James Grenning

James Grenning

President, Wingman Software Consulting
James Grenning’s trains, coaches and consults worldwide. With more than three decades of software development experience, both technical and managerial, James brings knowledge, skill, and creativity to software development teams and their management.  As his professional roots are in embedded software, James’ mission is to bring state-of-the-art technical and management practices to embedded development teams. He is the author of... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Canal B

2:00pm

Gaining Support for a Sustainable Agile Transformation (Dennis Stevens, Mike Cottmeyer)
Limited Capacity seats available

Command and control task level management is the norm in many organizations. In contrast, one of the key principles of Agile is around building projects around motivated individuals and trusting them to get the job done. Moving an organization to Agile can generate fear and uncertainty in the executives and management of organizations. That fear often manifests itself in an increase in the level of micro-management and the sense within teams that they aren't really trusted. These challenges can derail an Agile transformation.

This talk explores three key techniques for positioning teams and the transition as trustworthy, thereby earning the trust of the organization and gaining support from the PMO, managers, and executives to support, rather than derail, a transformation effort.

1. Tell executives what's in it for them - predictability, transparency, time to value, and quality. Show them how supporting the organizational design and management behaviors associated with Agile will increase their ability to achieve these goals. Big pictures, constant communications, and frequent interventions in conflict are required to deliver this. Use outcome-based metrics and show how executives expectations can help improve these outcomes.

2. Demonstrate engagement, progress, and control over the transformation efforts. Use a competency model to present the number of teams engaged, the agile competency of the teams, and the progress of the teams in achieving agile competency. Use the competency approach to engage the management in specific approaches to improvement. Use this model to show the light at the end of the training, coaching, and transformation tunnel.

3. Use Lean tools like road-maps, Kanban boards and A3's to demonstrate specific efforts targeted at specific improvements aligned with improving the metrics and the level of engagement with the teams. This shows awareness of the needs of the organization and the intentional management of addressing these needs.

With sufficient program management we

Speakers
avatar for Mike Cottmeyer

Mike Cottmeyer

CEO, LeadingAgile
LeadingAgile co-founder and CEO, Mike Cottmeyer is passionate about solving the challenges associated with Agile in larger, more complex enterprises. To that end, he and his team are dedicated to providing large-scale Agile transformation services to help pragmatically, incrementally, and safely introduce Agile methods. He spends most of his time leading and growing LeadingAgile, doing sales and business development, developing content, and... Read More →
avatar for Dennis Stevens

Dennis Stevens

LeadingAgile


Thursday August 8, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Governors C

2:00pm

Seven Deadly Sins of Agile Measurement (Larry Maccherone)
Limited Capacity full

Using Measurement as **levers** rather than for **feedback**, is sin #1. What's the difference? **Levers** are employed to **change someone else's behavior**. **Feedback** is employed to **improve your own performance**. The distinction is subtle but critical.

One of the most basic tenants of Agile is to trust the insight of the people closest to the work. But, here's the dilemma... as Agile scales into the enterprise, organizations are demanding measurement. I have seen many presentations on measurement and they often start with a quote like this one from Lord Kelvin, [When] you know something about [something]; but when you cannot measure it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind. A measurement regime based upon this tenant is doomed to drive you to the dark side. Rather, **the introduction of measurement to the Agile domain requires that it complement and even amplify the qualitative insight of those closest to the work, NOT replace or counter it.**

The above is just one example. This talk will walk you through the seven deadly sins to look out for when implementing an agile measurement regime, but it's not all fire and brimstone. We will leave you with a list of heavenly virtues or good practices to follow when implementing your measurement regime and we will present examples of companies that we have worked with and whose metrics regimes exhibit these virtues. This information should give you the means to bend your own execs towards risk evaluation rather than absolutes; toward measurement as an insight amplification and feedback mechanism rather than a club to beat people up; as something that your teams will seek out rather than something that they will dread.


Speakers
avatar for Larry Maccherone

Larry Maccherone

Optimizer, AgileCraft
Larry Maccherone is an accomplished author and highly rated speaker who has regularly presented at major international conferences on Lean and Agile. He is very excited to have recently joined AgileCraft where his passion for analytics and visualization is helping AgileCraft be the best way to scale Agile. Prior to that, he led the Insights product line at Rally Software. His core area of expertise is drawing interesting insights from data... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Bayou C

2:00pm

You think you know your user? Think again! (Ariadna Font)
Limited Capacity seats available

Experience UX methods to determine the right minimal amount of functionality that you can ship (Minimal Viable Product) that is what your users need/want the most.
In this fast-paced highly collaborative session, participants will experience the power of lean (quick and lightweight) UX methods first hand by applying fast and effective techniques that will force teams to focus and gain insights and, most importantly, to validate their assumptions about users and usability very early in the design and development stages.

Come to this session to:

  1. Experience the power of informal usability testing at any stage of design and development

  2. Put quick and effective Lean UX techniques to practice with a team and learn to effectively deliver a Minimal Viable Product fast

  3. Experience collaborative and iterative design first hand

  4. Build up the confidence to initiate collaborative creative thinking about ideas that have a business impact and that will wow your users


Speakers
avatar for Ariadna Font

Ariadna Font

User Experience Lead and Manager, IBM
UX Lead and Development manager at IBM building the next generation of large-scale customer experience software. I have been spearheading and practicing Lean, Agile and UX methods at Vivisimo and now IBM with the ultimate goal to improve communication, gain shared understanding and increase happiness. I strive to empower others and work tirelessly to improve the way our growing Engineering team deliver and work together. I have a passion for... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Bayou D

2:00pm

Lean Experiments - Delighting Customers in One Month (Alline Watkins)
Limited Capacity seats available

Have you ever practice Customer Development?

After reading all the books and start practicing Eric Ries' Lean Startup and Steve Blank's Customer Development for real, Alline Watkins compiled a series of best practices and tips on how to do these processes in the most productive way. Alline Watkins has coached enterprises and startups for years and has used a method that goes straight to the point to delight customers within a month.

What customers want? What users are going to use? How to avoid waste? What is a Minimum Viable Product?

Starting with the customers' problems and diving deep into their desires is possible to develop a minimum and viable product that is efficient and usable in four weeks of hard work.

Having customers and users experimenting the real value of the software before building it is the key to avoid waste and save time and resources.

Alline will be sharing her stories and illustrating the presentation with her own experience. Bring yours too, we will love to share them!

This talk is based on the blog: [http://MVPX.co](http://MVPX.co)

Structure of the presentation:
1. How to develop Customer in a month. (20 min)
Interviewing the Customer, Experiment the Solution, Acquiring Early Adopters and Developing the MVP.
2. Concepts explanation. (20 min)
Customer Development, Users and Payers, Target Problem, Lean Experiment, MVP, Build-Measure-Learn loop, Non-vanity metrics.
3. [The 13 flaws of Lean Startup and Customer Development](http://mvpx.co/flaws/) (20 min)
4. Q&A (15 min)

Speakers

Thursday August 8, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Canal E

2:00pm

Agile Education (John Miller)
Limited Capacity seats available

A self-organzing team is an amazing thing. Imagine, a self-organzing classroom. Agile is the next generation learning framework.The Agile Based Learning Environment (ABLE), an adaption of Scrum and Kanban for education, unleashes the love of learning, empowers students, and transforms school culture to a thriving model of 21st century learning. In less than a year, one elementary school has taken Agile from one classroom to the entire school and is spreading to other schools at the grassroots level. A charter school system is piloting ABLE, and sees it as the path to reforming education so that students thrive today and tomorrow. The ABLE implementation guide for educators will be shared to step you through what Agile looks like in the classroom and how you can partner with teachers to create a generation of Agile natives. Be a part of a vibrant transformation for social good, engaging learning in the present, and helping students thrive in the future.

Speakers
avatar for John Miller

John Miller

Agile Coach, The Braintrust Consulting Group
Believe Agile can make a vibrant future for society.


Thursday August 8, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Canal A

2:00pm

Growing Experts with the Dreyfus Model (Liz Keogh)
Limited Capacity seats available

The Dreyfus Model of Skill Acquisition proposes five levels of expertise, from novice through to expert. In this talk, we look at how to create simple, light-weight models for different skills, how to use them to spot individuals' strengths and potential, and how to help people move forward and achieve the goals they want, in life or in work - with plenty of pragmatic tips for getting it working and avoiding common pitfalls.

Speakers
avatar for LIZ KEOGH

LIZ KEOGH

Lunivore Limited
Liz Keogh is a Lean and Agile consultant based in London. She is a well-known blogger and international speaker, a core member of the BDD community and a contributor to a number of open-source projects including JBehave. She has a strong technical background with over 15 years’ experience in delivering value and coaching others to deliver, from small start-ups to global enterprises. Most of her work now focuses on Lean, Agile and... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Governors D

2:00pm

Agile Testing - What Isn't Working for You? (Janet Gregory)
Limited Capacity seats available

I see teams repeat the same mistakes, and others try for utopia right from the beginning of adopting agile. Let's talk about real problems - for example:
* What about testing isn't working for you in your agile team?
* What are people telling you to do, that doesn't sound right?
* Are you having issues getting the help you need from other team members?

Take this opportunity to discuss with Janet Gregory some of your very real issues.

Speakers
avatar for Janet Gregory

Janet Gregory

Agile Coach, DragonFire Inc.
An agile testing coach and practitioner, Janet Gregory (@janetgregoryca) is the co-author of Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams, More Agile Testing: Learning Journeys for the Whole Team, and a contributor to 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know. Janet specializes in showing agile teams how testers can add value in areas beyond critiquing the product for example, guiding development with business-facing tests. For the... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Delta D

2:00pm

Strength in scenarios: Getting meaningful user feedback on designs (Renee Pinter, Thomas Piggott)
Limited Capacity seats available

“What do you think?” and “How does this look?” are easy questions to ask when presenting users with potential design concepts, but they rarely give way to meaningful feedback. Using scenarios (workflow-based stories that provide a framework for getting user feedback) allows the user to give more honest, relevant feedback more closely related to the work they do on an everyday basis. It’s essential to gather user feedback during all stages of an iterative design process, and using scenarios to support design assessments works well within an Agile environment. In this workshop session, geared towards designers and product owners, we will explore what goes into creating meaningful scenarios and how they can be used. We will practice writing scenarios based on provided user workflows and paper prototypes. Scenarios can be a great tool in your toolbox for gathering requirements that your users will appreciate.

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Piggott

Thomas Piggott

High-Tech Anthropologist®, Menlo Innovations
I love seeing and understanding how people tackle problems and it's my goal to make the world a better place through design, however I can. I've been lucky enough to experience this around the globe, from Singapore to Silicon Valley, and in many different industries, such as education and health care. | | Agile has made my life easier because it helps lay out a clear plan from the start while providing the flexibility to make mistakes faster... Read More →
avatar for Renee Pinter

Renee Pinter

Experience Designer, Menlo Innovations
As a subcontractor for Menlo Innovations, Renee has spent years as a High-Tech Anthropologist(R), Project Manager and currently as Experience Designer. She actively explores how Menlo's style of agile project management methodologies can be adapted in a variety of work environments, both inside and outside the software industry.


Thursday August 8, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Bayou B

2:00pm

Story Maps, Slices, Customer Journeys and Other Product Design Tools (david hussman)
Limited Capacity seats available

Physicists often make assumptions as a tool to look deeper into a specific topic. Using this approach, assume delivery is a constant. Assume that a team is quite good a decomposing work and consistently delivering it in a timely manner. If this were the case, how would it change the way you work? How well would your product design and product discovery skills hold up to a consistent flow in delivery?

Building on the many successful delivery techniques that exist, this session examines the challenges and realities of product design. Teaching tools like story mapping and product slicing, this session will challenge you to apply these ideas to your product or domain so you leave with more than just ideas. Unlike delivery, product design is clumsy and non-linear, and you are often wrong. Thankfully, quicker delivery provides a vehicle to learn faster and steer towards the most valuable product and the best user experiences.

Stop in and let’s see what customer journeys you might want to create.

Speakers
avatar for David Hussman

David Hussman

Founder, DevJam
I split my time between leading DevJam and coaching at client sites. My coaching ranges from small teams to large enterprises and entails working with teams, programs and leadership groups. Some days I am doing discovery work, teaching product thinking and agile design and augmenting real agility with user centered design and user experience tools. Other days I am deep in the delivery space helping teams adapt agile methods to meet their needs... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Delta B

3:45pm

Agile Negotiation: The Agilist’s Guide to Persuasion and Influence (Adam Weisbart, Emily Epstein)
Limited Capacity full

Scrum transformed the way you develop software; let Agile Negotiation transform the way you get what you need for yourself and your team. Agilists put great importance on “Individuals & Interactions” and “Customer Collaboration.” Do you have thetools to support these values? Are you a high-performing negotiator?

Emily Epstein of the UC Berkeley Law School and Adam Weisbart, CST will introduce you to a framework you can use to move from positional negotiation to a value-driven approach. The transformation to Agile Negotiation is as powerful as the switch from Waterfall to Scrum. Come see why.

Speakers
avatar for Emily Epstein

Emily Epstein

Principal, Oakbay Consulting
Emily F. Epstein specializes in teaching negotiation, facilitation, mediation, and communication skills. As the founder of Oakbay Consulting, she focuses on helping clients break through impasse, collaborate across functions, and build stronger relationships. Ms. Epstein has been invited by organizations on four continents to help them overcome protracted challenges, from boosting the profitability of a Fortune 500 company to reducing the... Read More →
avatar for Adam Weisbart

Adam Weisbart

Corporate Agilist, Weisbart Consulting, Inc
Adam is a passionate Certified Scrum Trainer and Agile Coach based in San Francisco. He has created several training modules including Build Your Own Scrum which is used by trainers around the world to teach Scrum from the back of the room. He's the creator of the viral video "Sh*t Bad Scrum Masters Say", the baker of Retrospective Cookies, and author of the upcoming book Agile Antipatterns: The Scrum Master's Guide to Traps, Tripwires... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Bayou A

3:45pm

Are Questions the Answer? (David Bernstein)
Limited Capacity seats available

Could the kinds of questions we ask ourselves and others help us become better collaborators, coaches, and impact our very quality of life? Can simply asking better questions improve everything we do? This highly interactive session questions our questioning and reveals valuable techniques for accessing hidden abilities within ourselves and others. You'll be guided through a series of interactive exercises to discover how to use questions that empower and motivate us to access our resourcefulness, re-frame limiting beliefs, and strengthen rapport. You’ll practice using the Precision Model to help you instantly identify five ways we commonly distort our understanding of a situation and use five challenge questions to gain clarity and improve communication. Applying this simple skill will help you achieve new insight into any problem or situation you encounter. You’ll also do an exercise to help you discover better questions that can lead to answers you may not have thought of otherwise, and you’ll identify a burning question you can ask yourself to motivate and drive you towards greater fulfillment. By the end of this workshop you’ll have practiced several techniques for using questions to marshal problem-solving resources and collaborate more effectively.


Speakers
avatar for David Bernstein

David Bernstein

Consultant, To Be Agile
David Scott Bernstein is the author of the new book _Beyond Legacy Code: Nine Practices to Extend the Life (and Value) of Your Software._ It’s an insider’s view of the software industry drawn from his decades of hands-on experience as a software developer, trainer, and consultant to some of the biggest players in the business. With its emphasis on technical excellence, the primary audience for _Beyond Legacy Code_ is software development... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Bayou C

3:45pm

Metrics That Matter (Erik Weber)
Limited Capacity full

Metrics and measurements are standard practice in waterfall projects due to long project times, extensive costs, and high-risk outcomes. Agile projects limit this risk and therefore the use of traditional waterfall metrics no longer apply. Having a better understanding of the psychological and behavioral aspects of motivating people, we can eliminate the use of old, vanity metrics and standardize the use of new, agile measures. This presentation combines theoretical background with real-life examples and successfully applied agile metrics. It also gives managers and executives a clear charter for how to use metrics effectively and things they may be focused on that are causing more harm than good.

Speakers

Thursday August 8, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Canal E

3:45pm

Practical Refactoring (Llewellyn Falco, Woody Zuill)
Limited Capacity seats available

Refactoring is easy; the theories have been written and even automated in your tools. Yet many of us still have to work every day with ugly code and large amounts of technical debt. When faced with large code bases, we feel unable to begin and often fall back to the old excuse “that won’t work here.”

It’s time to get real. We are going to take a 300 line ball of mud, and show some new approaches and techniques so that you can actually start using those automated refactorings in your IDE to start safely changing your code little by little. We will demonstrate:

* How to act without understanding the code
* Effective orders to act on code (do these before these)
* Emergent Design
* Small steps
* How to refactor without needing permission or budget

As we go through the code understanding will emerge as well as a sense of calm and empowerment. We are going to be proving that every 2 minutes we have slightly better code, and that those series of small improvements will add up to massively better code.

Overall, this will give a preview into what the effect of small daily improvements looks like over a few months of a much larger project, so you can see how starting on the path of continuous improvement will impact your own project at work.

Speakers
avatar for Llewellyn Falco

Llewellyn Falco

Agile Coach, Spun Labs
Llewellyn Falco is an Agile Technical Coach specializing in Legacy Code and Test Driven Development. He is the creator of the open source testing tool ApprovalTests( www.approvaltests.com ), co-founder of TeachingKidsProgram ( www.teachingkidsprogramming.org ) and a PluralSight author.
avatar for Woody Zuill

Woody Zuill

Application Development Manager, Hunter Industries
I've been a software developer for 30+ years, and I'm an Agile enthusiast. I work as an Agile Coach with the original "Mob Programming" team, and have been instrumental highlighting "No Estimates" concepts. | | I've enjoy sharing my Agile experiences, and learning new things. If you are ever in the San Diego area please stop by and "Mob" with us. | | I maintain and write for both the http://mobprogramming.org website, and my own blog at... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Bayou E

3:45pm

Developing Operability (Richard Crowley)
Limited Capacity seats available

This session is about taking agile methods all the way to production. At Betable, we've settled into a process for delivering our service that lets us deploy whenever we want while retaining high confidence in our service. Our confidence is not to be confused with cockiness, though: our confidence is built by processes and tools.

Automated testing guides our development process and gates the road to production. Every engineer plays an active role in QA as opposed to having a dedicated QA team; we'll talk briefly about the advantages and disadvantages of this decision. We'll discuss the particular way we organize our code into libraries and services to maximize testability and minimize coupling between both systems and the engineers that build them. We'll discuss mocking (and try to refrain from getting religious about it), where we use it, where we don't, and why.

A continuous integration server is responsible for running tests automatically in response to each push. That's hardly novel; it's what happens after the tests pass that gives us our confidence. We'll discuss how we used to package software for deployment, how we do it now, why we changed, and why it works so well. I'll talk about how this process helps us keep dependencies few and simple and why this is so important to us.

We'll then turn our focus to Betable's staging and production environments where the effort we put into packaging and testing pays its dividends. I'll compare several strategies for process supervision and restarting during deploys and attempt to judge them by their impact on availability at these critical inflection points. We'll talk about the tradeoffs between retrying failed requests and the potential for queries of death when we do so.

In staging and production we trade testing tools for verbose logging and detailed metrics. Much is said elsewhere about these tools so I will focus on how they feedback into our process. Metrics are our proof that our confidence is not in vain. Logs are out visibility i

Speakers
avatar for Richard Crowley

Richard Crowley

Head of Operations, Betable


Thursday August 8, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Canal A

3:45pm

Effecting a DevOps Transformation in the Enterprise at Salesforce.com (Dave Mangot, Karthik Rajan)
Limited Capacity seats available

Establishing a DevOps culture in an organization of 50 people where many people are already wearing different hats, are all sitting next to each other, and get together for an all hands every week is relatively easy to do. Transforming an enterprise with SVPs, EVPs, different cultures, practices, and walls built up around functional groups over a dozen years is a much different proposition.

In this experience report we discuss why we need DevOps and how we are effecting a transformation within salesforce.com. We will describe how Gene Kim’s “3-ways”, W. Edwards Deming’s principles, and salesforce.com’s version of Agile (ADM) are related, and how we are using organizational change, ADM and salesforce.com’s Chatter to transform an enterprise with thousands of employees to practice DevOps.

Speakers
avatar for Dave Mangot

Dave Mangot

Director of Operations, Librato and Papertrail (SWI)


Thursday August 8, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Governors E

3:45pm

Mass Conversion: transitioning to agile 10,000 people at a time (Arlo Belshee)
Limited Capacity seats available

Are you in a big company? Want to do agile? See several great ideas that just wouldn't work here because they are clearly designed for smaller companies? Wonder how you could even transition so many people without diluting the knowledge and skills?

Our team of 6 is transitioning 20,000 people at Microsoft, in 400+ product teams, over the course of a year. We are addressing all the tough problems: technical practices, generalizing the roles, dealing with legacy code, altering the relationship with customers, altering the culture used in reviews, and changing the ways teams think. This is not a planning-only Agile transition; we're changing the way code is written. We're going to share both our approach and specific techniques we used to change cultures, teach skills, alter behavior, and measure success.

Speakers
avatar for Arlo Belshee

Arlo Belshee

Sr. Program Mgr, Microsoft
Arlo helps you change cultures in large organizations. He transitions hundreds or thousands of people at a time to full technical and cultural prowess in a way that sticks. | | More importantly, Arlo gives your company the ability to change its own culture. He seeks to be the last consultant you will ever need to hire. After 6 months, you should be able to adapt your culture, practices, and company structures to meet novel challenges, each... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Delta D

3:45pm

Playing with Process - Airplane Game Simulation (Dean Stevens, Rick Austin)
Limited Capacity seats available

Individuals and interactions over process and tools. Absolutely. We still need sufficient process to promote effective collaboration. How can we see our processes? What levers can we pull to improve our process? How do the people affected feel about these changes?

The Airplane Game simulation presents a way to learn some basics of process science and to learn about your own agile process. Then we look at how these concepts apply in practice. Many Agile methods have these concepts baked in. Without this understanding, your team will be tempted to inspect and adapt away from effective practices. This interactive simulation arms you with the knowledge to better understand your process and make better decisions.

Speakers
avatar for Rick Austin

Rick Austin

Enterprise Agile Coach, LeadingAgile, LLC
With over 20 years of software development experience, Rick comes to LeadingAgile as an expert in the financial services industry. Rick has worked for such companies as Antipori Software, Integrated Benefit Systems, Fiserv, and Turner Broadcasting. He has experience in applying agile to small teams, large distributed teams, and organizational change management. Rick's self-proclaimed passion is “helping teams excel by improving the craft of... Read More →
avatar for Dean Stevens

Dean Stevens

Enterprise Agile Coach, LeadingAgile
CSPO, PMI-ACP LinkedIn Profile http://www.linkedin.com/in/stevensdean/


Thursday August 8, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Delta B

3:45pm

Driving Quality Improvement and Reducing Technical Debt with the Definition of Done (Noopur Davis)
Limited Capacity filling up

Do your projects have to meet corporate quality goals? Does your organization operate in a regulatory environment, such as FDA regulations? Does your project have non-functional requirements such as performance, scalability, security, or safety? Or are you just tired of mounting technical debt? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, or if you just want to improve product quality, find out how we used the Definition of Done to address these problems. We faced these issues with many teams we coached and mentored: through trial-and-error, we have developed a multi-level application of the Definition of Done to address these issues: story-level, iteration level, and release level. In this experience report, we will share how one organization used this multi-level Definition of Done for a large Agile program comprised of multiple, distributed Scrum teams. Quantitative results will be presented to show how product quality improved and technical debt was reduced as the Definition of Done became more stringent. Although the focus of the presentation will be one organization, we will also use real world examples of the application and evolution of a Definition of Done and the results achieved from other organizations as needed.

Speakers
avatar for Noopur  Davis

Noopur Davis

Principal, Davis Systems
I am passionate about software engineering excellence. For the past fifteen years, I have been helping organizations | -- transform their enterprise to be more agile in responding to change | -- build and nurture and maintain high performance teams | -- build quality in to deliver near-zero-defect products | -- introduce better project management, quality management, measurement, and product development practices. | | I have... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Canal B

3:45pm

Lean Change: Enabling Agile Transformation through Lean Startup, Kanban, and Kotter (Alexis Hui)
Limited Capacity seats available

Scrum, Kanban and other agile methods provide a means to transform IT to a high maturity state. Yet anyone who has been part of a large scale agile transformation can tell you that outcomes are anything but predictable. Sometimes these transformations succeed, sometimes they provide mixed results, sometimes the transformation outright fails. The change tactics used, and the specific methods chosen for adoption vary wildly depending on context. In a nutshell, the only certainty about large-scale agile transformation it is to expect uncertainty.

Eric Ries definition of a startup is as follows:

A startup is a human institution designed to deliver a new product or service under conditions of extreme uncertainty.

By this definition, an enterprise Agile change initiative could be deemed a startup, one that could take advantage of Lean Startup techniques.

During this session I will present a case study on how a team of Agile change agents leveraged Lean Startup principles to create the Lean Change method, enabling what our team calls Negotiated Change on a large scale organizational transformation.

I'll discuss how we defined a change plan using a Change Canvas, and tested the assumptions behind the plan by introducing incremental waves of change we have dubbed Minimal Viable Changes.

I will showcase how we cycled through a continuous learn, build, and measure loop to steer the course of our transformation. I'll discuss how we leveraged a negotiated, customer centric approach to change.

Finally, I'll give an overview of our key pivot/pursue decisions, and describe how the lean startup approach provided us with the feedback required to make several significant changes in direction during the course of the transformation.

For more on the Lean Change method, please visit: http://agileconsulting.blogspot.ca/2012/08/lean-change-part-2-lean-change-stack.html

Speakers
AH

Alexis Hui

Manager and Co-Lead of Deloitte LEAN, Deloitte
Alexis Hui is a Manager at Deloitte Consulting and his passion is to help IT organizations transform into innovation machines focused on delivering customer delight. To help his clients deliver on this mandate, he co-founded Deloitte LEAN, a global service offering that provides a packaged set of frameworks built on Lean, Agile, Lean Startup, Customer Development and Kotter Change Management methods. Alexis has worked with clients across a... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Governors D

3:45pm

Learn different leadership styles with Star Wars Coaches (Bruno Sbille)
Limited Capacity seats available

If you are part of a self-organized team, how can leadership styles and management styles be an asset to you?
Scrum emphasize the importance of direct contact between team-members. Have you ever experienced that discussing with each other can be though according to our personality or the situation?
Do you want to discover, great collaboration techniques that are usually only taught to managers?

Ladies and Gentlemen, please get on board, fasten your seatbelt and join us to this session to find out!

First, based on movie extracts of the epic Star Wars, we will discover different styles.
Then, through intensive role play, you will learn, through practice, how to use these styles and how to use them appropriately according to a person and a context.

Although pop-corn won't be served, you'll have the occasion to be the actors of this session!
You will learn new communication tools, and be coached by Yoda and Darth Vador.

Speakers
avatar for Bruno Sbille

Bruno Sbille

CST, Trainer, Coach, ELLIBS
I'm a Trainer (CST, Agile, Soft Skills) and a Coach (Agile, Life Coach) | | I've been in IT and Business consultancy since 1999. In addition to my project management experience, since 2006 I had the opportunity to discover a lot of new "things" to put in my "toolbox": Scrum, Agile but also NLP, coaching, people management, creativity techniques... | | I'm passionate about "making things happen". I Blog regularly in English and... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Bayou D

3:45pm

The Language of Change (Esther Derby)
Limited Capacity seats available

Language shapes thought, and thought shapes action. People talk about installing change, driving change, making change happen. When change doesn't happen as fast as they'd like, the people who want change talk about resistance, and try to kindle a sense of urgency.

What if the language we use makes it harder to bring about the differences we want to see?

I was educated to be logical, objective, “stick to the facts” and rely on reason. But that’s not the only way our brains work. Metaphors pervade our lives and thinking–so much so that we often don’t notice them. Metaphors “shape what we think,” what we see, and therefore affect our choices and options.

Consider the title “Agile Evangelist.” Evangelists are people who are imbued with The Truth–and want to convince everyone else of it. Sometimes evangelists succeed–through persuasion or harsher means. Would you welcome an evangel, come to tell you how wrong you’ve been?

In this talk I'll explore the words we use when we talk about change--and how they may get in our way. I'll look at the nature of change in a complex environment. And we'll try on some different words that might open different possibilities.

Speakers
avatar for Esther Derby

Esther Derby

Founder, esther derby associates, inc.
I’m an expert in organizational dynamics and a leading thinker in bringing agility to organizations, management, and teams. How your company’s values are reflected in your environment, your culture and organizational dynamics, directly determines the quality and level of your success. When your company environment, culture and organizational dynamics are positive, mutually receptive and reinforcing, your people and teams have the capacity to... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Governors C

3:45pm

Invisible Impediments to Learning: Why Bad Things Happen to Good Agilists (Amr Elssamadisy, Steve Peha)
Limited Capacity seats available

This workshop assumes the following hypothesis: “Learning is the bottleneck of software development and delivery.” It explores this hypothesis by asking and answering the question “What is it that keeps us from learning effectively?”

We are all aware of many challenges to learning: the length of the release cycle, the clarity of the goal, the ability to learn from failures, and so on. But this is not what this workshop is about.

This workshop is about things that are in our way every single day but which we may not notice or be able to express; some of are even uncomfortable to consider. For example:

How does my mindset affect my ability to learn as an individual and to contribute learning to my team and my organization?

How does my approach to ownership advance or hinder my ability to help myself and others push through challenges and recover from failure?

How does my respect—or lack thereof—for my peers affect my ability to build software?

What does it cost me or my team when I miss an agreement? And, just as important, what does it cost when when I fail to confront a missed agreement?

These are some of the invisible impediments to learning that reduce our ability to create great software efficiently.

In this session, participants identify these impediments to learning and leave with things they can do Monday morning to accelerate individual, team, and organizational effectiveness by breaking through the bottleneck that is so often the root cause of software development inefficiencies and project failures.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Peha

Steve Peha

Founder, Teaching That Makes Sense, Inc.
I am passionate about learning. This passion has united my efforts in technology and education. I have worked in hundreds of schools all over the US and Canada. I also recently finished up 18 months as a Product Owner on the Gates Foundation's Shared Learning Infrastructure project, a large ed tech platform that supports statewide longitudinal data systems and enables a robust application ecosystem to enhance personalized learning. At this... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Governors A

3:45pm

The Cynefin Lego Game: Recognizing the Complexity Domain of your Problem (Dave Sharrock, Brad Swanson)
Limited Capacity seats available

We expect leadership teams to find innovative solutions to business challenges, and yet rarely give any consideration to how to solve these challenges. Current thinking is leading us to understand that different types of problems lie in different complexity domains, and require different ways of solving them. And the mix of solution types is shifting, meaning our traditional approaches to problem solving are not always suited to the new problems we encounter.

The Cynefin framework, introduced by Dave Snowdon, provides a simple model to understand the types of problems and how to solve them. Using Cynefin and complexity thinking can accelerate organizational learning by recognizing the problem domain for a particular situation and knowing what class of solution is appropriate. Recognizing the complexity of a problem is a behavior that will enhance learning, and failing to recognize it may restrict learning within the community.

As managers and leaders, we need to understand what types of problems we encounter, and which tools and approaches are best in each case. Using a series of Lego exercises, participants will experience each problem domain, from simple to complicated to complex to chaotic, and emerge different approaches to problem solving in each domain. Some will work, some won't. You will experience the importance of choosing the right approach for each problem domain, and what happens when we use the wrong approach to solve a problem.

Expect to understand what type of system you are dealing with by recognizing when practices stop working, and learn to decode what is happening in terms of organizational structures and communication in that specific system.

Speakers
avatar for Dave Sharrock

Dave Sharrock

VP, agile42
Dad, internet veteran, husband, entrepreneur, occasional seismologist. British and almost Canadian. Agile coach and change agent. Only Certified Enterprise Coach (CEC) and Certified Scrum Trainer (CST) in Canada.
avatar for Brad Swanson

Brad Swanson

Senior Agile Coach, agile42 LLC
Brad Swanson is a Senior Agile Coach and Vice President at agile42. He started his software career at age 10 on the Apple IIe and is now a Certified Scrum Trainer® (CST) and Coach (CSC) with 19 years of experience in management, project and program leadership, product management, and software development in both start-ups and large companies. Brad has led agile transformations using XP, Scrum and Kanban at many organizations across the US... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Bayou B

3:45pm

Products, Not Projects: Using Product Roadmaps to Deliver Value (Ellen Gottesdiener)
Limited Capacity filling up

If you’re managing your agile delivery using projects—and not products—you may be missing the point. After all, the product-to-be is the basis for the vision, goals, and expected outcomes you’ve defined for your work. Learn how your organization can benefit from an essential product management tool—a product roadmap—and how to adapt your product roadmap to your agile projects.

A product roadmap articulates how you will continually deliver a valued product over a long time horizon and provides a framework for decision making. Most agile teams focus on plans at the tactical level, such as iterations or work-in-progress (the Now-View) or near term releases (the Pre-View). But that practice can result in products that fail to provide the kind of value the organization expects. Your product roadmap focuses all stakeholders on the strategic Big-View and guides you in continually adapting immediate and near-term planning.

In this session, we explore the whys, whats, and hows of product roadmaps. You learn how to define steps for building and sustaining your product roadmaps, how to determine who is involved, and how to evaluate the options on your roadmap. You’ll also learn the essentials of facilitating roadmapping workshops. Join us to learn how product roadmaps are used on agile projects to help you deliver the right product, align organizational ends with means, adapt to changing product needs, and make tough choices that will deliver greater strategic value.

Speakers
avatar for Ellen Gottesdiener

Ellen Gottesdiener

CEO/Founder, EBG Consulting
Ellen Gottesdiener is an internationally recognized leader in the convergence of agile + requirements + product management and a pioneer in the use of collaborative practices for product discovery. She offers techniques, tools, training, and leadership in how you can engage in ways that excite, invite, and produce valuable product outcomes and happy teams. | | Ellen is a world-renowned writer, speaker, and presenter. Her most recent book... Read More →


Thursday August 8, 2013 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Canal C/D

7:00pm

Conference Party
Thursday August 8, 2013 7:00pm - 11:00pm
Wildhorse Saloon 120 2nd Ave. North Nashville, TN 37201
 
Friday, August 9
 

9:00am

5 Agile Leadership Ideas You Can’t Afford To Miss? (Pollyanna Pixton)
Free? Is anything free these days? Based on her experience working with organizational leaders and her research into what drives organizational performance, Pollyanna Pixton shares five leadership ideas to help assure the success of your agile teams. As a bonus, her suggestions won’t cost you a thing. Pollyanna’s first free idea is how to create a culture of trust—the keystone of open collaboration—within your team and organization. The second free idea is about ownership, the necessary requirement for self-organized teams. Pollyanna discusses how to give it and not take it back by asking the right questions. Number three—you can only fix processes, not people. Invest your energy toward the correct target. Idea four is to match people’s roles to their passion. You will learn how to uncover the passions in your team members. Her final free idea is that integrity matters most. Essential for teams to build trust between themselves and with the organization.

Speakers
avatar for Pollyanna Pixton

Pollyanna Pixton

President, Accelinnova
Pollyanna Pixton's career focus has been to help develop great leaders who bring collaboration, trust and ownership into their organizations to improve the work environment and increase productivity and innovation.


Friday August 9, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Canal A

9:00am

Behavior-Driven Development: Embrace Uncertainty (Liz Keogh)
Whenever we take on a project, there's always some aspect of it that's new. We can't possibly know everything about it up-front. Talking through different scenarios can help, but when customers don't know what they want, forcing them to choose an outcome just hides the problem for a while. What do you do when outcomes won't come out? In this talk we look at we can have the most effective conversations with our customers in the time we have, using examples and scenarios not just as specifications, but as sense-making tools for spotting and focusing on high uncertainty so that we can embrace it, help our customers to collaborate around it and delight them by resolving the risk early, rather than late.

Speakers
avatar for LIZ KEOGH

LIZ KEOGH

Lunivore Limited
Liz Keogh is a Lean and Agile consultant based in London. She is a well-known blogger and international speaker, a core member of the BDD community and a contributor to a number of open-source projects including JBehave. She has a strong technical background with over 15 years’ experience in delivering value and coaching others to deliver, from small start-ups to global enterprises. Most of her work now focuses on Lean, Agile and... Read More →


Friday August 9, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Canal C/D

9:00am

Business Structures, Rewards, and Why Your Company is not Successfully Adopting Agile (Geri Winters)
It’s clear that many companies have problems adopting Agile software development practices. Many very large corporations are optimized to support Waterfall development, and so the very structures of the company and its reward systems prevent the company from being able to adopt Agile. Business structures and practices that make Agile difficult to impossible include lengthy project funding cycles, heavy change control processes, a focus on projects rather than workstreams, silos, a high degree of employee specialization, matrix based staffing models, risks and controls defined around waterfall deliverables, facilities rules about moving furniture, and how work is accounted for, to name just a few.

When we reward people for becoming increasingly specialized, when we reward projects only for delivering on time and budget, then we make it difficult to impossible to implement some of the core Agile practices (co-location, dedication, responding to change, focus on business value). Introducing good software engineering practices to support Agile development, such as modular development, architectural practices, coding and programming standards, and Continuous Integration, can also be surprisingly difficult to implement because of specialization, a desire to not lay off people, confusion about how to promote and reward people, and even problems with accounting.

Different companies will have different answers as to how far they want to go along the Agile adoption curve. At the same time, we have to recognize that most major corporations will continue to do some work using Waterfall, and so the changes we suggest to support Agile cannot break Waterfall. What are some of the challenges of making the changes to better support Agile? If your company does A, and decides to change to B to better support Agile, what are some ideas for how you get from A to B and what are the potential impacts on the organization? Also, can you stop part way to B and still get benefit, or do you really have to go all the way.

This presentation will equip you with the knowledge you need to talk with your managers about whether to adopt Agile practices and how far you want to go in your Agile adoption.


Speakers
avatar for Geri Winters

Geri Winters

President/CEO, Lead Consultant, Wyyzzk, Inc.
When not being consulted for large scale Agile implementations or executive strategies, I can be found pursuing one of my other passions: Directing Musicals, Hypnosis, Direct Marketing, and - with my husband - mentoring young women in STEM, particularly our all girls FRC Robotics Team: Girls of Steel. FIRST Robotics rocks!


Friday August 9, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Governor's E

9:00am

Agile Negotiation: The Agilist’s Guide to Persuasion and Influence (Adam Weisbart, Emily Epstein)
Scrum transformed the way you develop software; let Agile Negotiation transform the way you get what you need for yourself and your team. Agilists put great importance on “Individuals & Interactions” and “Customer Collaboration.” Do you have thetools to support these values? Are you a high-performing negotiator?

Emily Epstein of the UC Berkeley Law School and Adam Weisbart, CST will introduce you to a framework you can use to move from positional negotiation to a value-driven approach. The transformation to Agile Negotiation is as powerful as the switch from Waterfall to Scrum. Come see why.

Speakers
avatar for Emily Epstein

Emily Epstein

Principal, Oakbay Consulting
Emily F. Epstein specializes in teaching negotiation, facilitation, mediation, and communication skills. As the founder of Oakbay Consulting, she focuses on helping clients break through impasse, collaborate across functions, and build stronger relationships. Ms. Epstein has been invited by organizations on four continents to help them overcome protracted challenges, from boosting the profitability of a Fortune 500 company to reducing the... Read More →
avatar for Adam Weisbart

Adam Weisbart

Corporate Agilist, Weisbart Consulting, Inc
Adam is a passionate Certified Scrum Trainer and Agile Coach based in San Francisco. He has created several training modules including Build Your Own Scrum which is used by trainers around the world to teach Scrum from the back of the room. He's the creator of the viral video "Sh*t Bad Scrum Masters Say", the baker of Retrospective Cookies, and author of the upcoming book Agile Antipatterns: The Scrum Master's Guide to Traps, Tripwires... Read More →


Friday August 9, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Delta B

9:00am

Better Metrics for your Team (Nayan Hajratwala)
Are you still measuring the performance of your team with Velocity, Estimates vs. Actuals, Utilization, Code Coverage, Cyclomatic Complexity, and “style violations”? Are your business stakeholders still in the dark about when they can expect new features? If so, you’re missing the boat.

The good news is that there are more powerful and reliable metrics that are cheaper to derive. Trust me, you will love these metrics and they will love you back.

During this session we'll discuss a variety of metrics, see real examples of projects they have been used on, and engage in an interactive game showing you their power and how to capture them.

You’ll walk away from this session understanding the purpose of capturing metrics, how few you actually need, and how you can apply them to your project starting on Monday.

Speakers
avatar for Nayan Hajratwala

Nayan Hajratwala

Lean / Agile Coach, Chikli Consulting
Nayan Hajratwala is the owner of Chikli Consulting. A Lean/Agile Coach with over 15 years of hands-on experience delivering software, he has significant programming experience and is a deep technologist always exploring new languages and ideas. His specialties include training software teams to increase their productivity and decrease their time-to-market while improving the quality of their product. Nayan is a speaker at many user groups and... Read More →


Friday August 9, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Bayou C

9:00am

Conflict Facilitation as a Leadership Skill: A Systems Approach for Leaders & Coaches (Michael Spayd, Lyssa Adkins)
Whether hot and messy or cold and hidden, conflict surrounds us as leaders. There are two common choices: become the arbitrator who breaks the tie, or throw up our hands in exasperation, deciding it’s the (self-organized) team’s problem. A third, more powerful approach is to become a skilled conflict facilitator. This hands-on workshop provides four interrelated systems intelligence tools and mindsets to help you prevent destructive conflict and encourage the creative kind: positive/negative ratio, deep democracy, the Conflict Dynamics model, and conflict protocols.

The relationship systems approach, from CRRGlobal, will be discussed and facilitated by two experienced agile + relationship systems coaches in this session. First laying a foundation with the team’s positive/negative behavioral ratio, to create a positive emotional bank account that helps people “assume positive intent” and strengthen resiliency. We then add an attitude for the leader called Deep Democracy, a systems approach to hearing all voices in a system. The heart of the approach is familiarity with the common constructive and destructive behaviors exhibited by people in conflict from the Conflict Dynamics model, a framework to think about how we get into conflict as a team. Do we take each other's perspective? Or, do we try to win the argument at all costs? There are a total 15 such behaviors, based on research into how people and teams really get into conflict. If I know these, I can talk to my team about them, have a discussion of what our favorite behaviors, then agree to work on eliminating or minimizing the destructive ones, whether passive or active. Finally, we add a behavioral structure -- Conflict Protocols -- to prepare teams for the heat of conflict. You will get practice with the Conflict Dynamics model and with Conflict Protocols in this session.

Speakers
avatar for Lyssa Adkins

Lyssa Adkins

Coach of Agile Coaches, Agile Coaching Institute
I came to Agile as a project leader with over 15 years project management expertise. Even with all that experience, nothing prepared me for the power and simplicity of Agile done well.My Agile experience, along with my professional coaching and training abilities, gives me the perspective needed to guide teams and Agile leaders to harness Agile as the competitive advantage weapon it was meant to be. I know the transformation path is rocky. As a... Read More →
avatar for Michael Spayd

Michael Spayd

Chief Executive, Agile Coaching Institute, LLC
Since 2001, I have been immersed in Agile & Lean thinking and practices. From the beginning, I was drawn into large-scale transformation initiatives, especially the change and cultural aspects. I love to work at all levels of an organization, from teams and their managers to project offices and execs. I have educated thousands of people, coached scores of teams and worked with well over a hundred managers. I am currently writing a book entitled... Read More →


Friday August 9, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Delta D

9:00am

DRIVE Workshop: Using Autonomy, Mastery and Purpose to transform your organization (Erik Weber)

The old models are broken. We see it everywhere - in three decades of declining employee engagement, in organizations that are struggling to adapt, and in a broader sense that businesses and governments alike could be doing better. That’s why cutting-edge organizations throughout the world are tossing off the outdated, mechanistic 21st century approach and embracing something new. Built upon five decades of social science, this new approach uses autonomy, mastery, and purpose as the pathway to high performance. As you will discover, challenging the existing orthodoxies isn’t just exhilarating. Today it’s the only way to survive.

Dan Pink’s book DRIVE is nearly ubiquitous in the agile community, yet until recently there were no concrete HOW-TO’s available for teams and organizations. In this 75 workshop, I’ll present an overview of the basic principles of motivation, backed by science, and illustrated through real life examples. Then we'll cover the 3 keys to motivation and engagement; and we’ll workshop some real-life HOW-TO scenarios for making this happen in the real world.

Everybody will leave with a play-book of ideas to take back to their organizations.


Speakers

Friday August 9, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Governors A

9:00am

How to Measure Value (Gabrielle Benefield, Ryan Shriver)

The Voice of the Customer is heralded in the Agile community yet we still seem to focus on increasing our velocity and creating the most elegant bullet proof code. If you are simply building the wrong product 'righter', then you risk gold-plating a product nobody wants to use. Instead we should focus on the Customer and user 'Outcomes'. What they need to achieve, be it buying a book on Amazon to improving the way we run our business processes. The Outcome Delivery movement is emerging as a community focused on helping Customers achieve value. This session is one piece in the large jigsaw of being able to help our customers articulate what they really need, instead of telling us what they want. If you can help your customers articulate clearly what outcomes they desire, and make this tangible with quantifying the results (so we know when we reach the customer 'success' threashold) and qualifying progressively that the outputs we build are moving us towards the target outcomes, then we can create a common platform to communicate. To help build the right outcomes, for the right people, at the right time.

We provide an objective framework to help you target Outcomes over Outputs and understand how being able to constantly adapt to changing target conditions and being able to create a way to measure value, will help you more than all of the 'Product Backlog' sorting techniques on the market today.

Over the past decade, agile and lean methods have brought enormous benefits to teams and organizations. These improvements have primarily focused on helping build things faster, with higher quality and improved collaboration. What hasn’t been a focus is ensuring teams are building the right things. As a result, a feature farming culture has emerged that focuses all their energy on managing backlogs and measuring velocity with little clue as to whether the improvements are achieving their intended business goals or solving a core problem. Many times the real goals and outcomes aren't even defined clearly and shared with the team.

This needs to change. Lean and agile teams including their leaders should start quantifying what value is, aligning their solutions to delivering value and iteratively measuring their progress towards these desired outcomes. Using this approach helps greatly clarify the opportunity for focus, prioritize the backlog of potential solutions for maximum impact and directly link stories with desired customer outcomes. This helps teams focus on delivering the right things from the first Sprint and leaders focus their limited resources on solutions with the biggest bang for the buck.

Ryan Shriver and Gabrielle Benefield have spent the last decade working with teams and organizations transitioning to agile. Their focus is to 'stand on the shoulders of giant's'; bringing the ideas from people like Tom Gilb and the Poppendiecks and the leading UX design thinkers in a new and simplified fashion that make these techniques pragmatic and accessible. Over the last two years they've collaborated to create a simple framework to help people understand what value is, how to measure it, and how to track the value delivered. Simple visuals, simple metrics, simple processes. The result is a practical approach to helping people continually build the right thing that compliments existing methods including Scrum, Kanban and Lean Startup.

This is a hands-on workshop where attendees will be introduced to the concepts through working a case study. We will provide our simple models to fill in and give guidance and feedback on the real world uses of this approach.


Speakers
avatar for Gabrielle Benefield

Gabrielle Benefield

CEO, Evolve Beyond
I want to help people build great products that are beautifully designed. I believe in Outcomes over Outputs and being highly adaptive.
avatar for Ryan Shriver

Ryan Shriver

Enterprise Technology Director, Dominion Digital
Passionate about helping teams deliver better outcomes, not just more output.


Friday August 9, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Bayou B

9:00am

Inspire Management (Bernd Schiffer)

One of the most rewarding change opportunities for organization to create awesome workplaces exists by being innovative at the management level. Forget step-by-step explanations of management practices (you can’t copy culture!); the key to address the management level - i.e. to foster innovations at this level - is by inspirations. In order to get an awesome workplace, you have to see awesome workplaces. There are plenty of ways to inspire people, but this opportunity is often wasted during the introduction of Scrum and Kanban methods, or never reflected upon afterwards.

In this session, I will show you several aspects of awesome workplaces. A constantly growing container for inspiring management are the Agile Management Innovations (AMI). AMIs are practices for management which lead to democracy, fairness, decentralisation, dialogue, and lot of other positive effects. These effects lead to awesome workplaces, where people are truly motivated. The idea behind inspiration is to foster creativity and innovation through a changed environment. Management practices can't be just applied; 50% of managent practices depend upon the organisation's culture. That's why we call them AMInnovations.

If you experiment with AMIs, you'll get from status quo to awesome (that is of course only when you're status quo is not already awesomeness).

I’ll introduce the concept of AMI as well as plenty of real world examples. The goal is to inspire you twofold: I will inspire you in this session to experiment with AMIs, and AMIs will inspire the people within your organisation to achieve a better workplace.


Speakers
avatar for Bernd Schiffer

Bernd Schiffer

Agile Coach, Trainer, and Consultant, Bold Mover
Bernd Schiffer is Agile coach, trainer and consultant in Melbourne, Australia. He founded his own Agile company called Bold Mover, and he's been doing Agile and Lean for about 12 years. He often works at the client's introducing Scrum and Kanban at team and management level. He deeply cares about his work, and he's passionate about running long distances.


Friday August 9, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Bayou E

9:00am

Sketch You Can! Demystifying a Powerful Collaboration Technique (Jeremy Kriegel)

"This meeting is a waste of my time." When was the last time you had that thought? Was it because the conversation wasn't focused, or people couldn't agree, or maybe they were in violent agreement, but couldn't see it? How easily do you think you can get this meeting back on track? In this session, you will learn a skill that you can apply on the spot that will help you focus the conversation and drive to consensus. Everything you need is probably already in the room.

This technique is specifically for conversations around the features, functions, and behaviors of your product. Most people are visual thinkers, so give them something visual to focus on. You can do that by walking up to the whiteboard and drawing out what people are talking about. By visually capturing the conversation in a public way, you will help all participants understand each other and come to consensus faster. "But I can't draw," you say. Neither can I, and I’ve been successfully using this technique for over 15 years. If you can draw a straight-ish line and a box, you have all the drawing skills necessary.

In this engaging workshop, you will learn how to create a basic sketch of an interface using some simple sketching techniques and UX principles as well as practice thinking-on-your-feet that will help you comfortably do this with a group.

I have used this technique to help teams focus the conversation, visualize the requirements they were requesting, quickly experiment with new ideas, and provide detailed input that I can use to design the outcome. Often, the sketch (or a photo of it) acts as the deliverable for simple problems, eliminating the need for more formal wireframes. This technique is accessible to everyone. You don’t need any special software and anyone on the team can use it. Pick up the pen and get on track again.


Speakers
avatar for Jeremy Kriegel

Jeremy Kriegel

UX Manager, BzzAgent
Jeremy Kriegel has been designing great user experiences (UX) for 18 years. Just as we need to understand the needs and context of users to craft a design solution, Jeremy believes that success also requires us to look at the business context to craft an appropriate design process. From start-ups to Fortune 100 companies, as a consultant or on an internal team, he has seen a lot of different scenarios that each required their own approach. He... Read More →


Friday August 9, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Bayou D

9:00am

Technical Debt for the Non-Technical (Maria Matarelli, Collin Fagan)
Demystify challenges in continuous software development by learning the importance of addressing Technical Debt. Leave with a new perspective and fresh ideas on how to explain it to others, even the non-technical. Hear real world examples and situations to relate the jargon filled technical world of software development to everyday life using Technical Debt as a metaphor referring to the eventual consequences of poor or evolving software architecture and software development. Understand short term and long term impacts of uncompleted changes within a codebase, and most importantly, learn techniques on how to address it.


Friday August 9, 2013 9:00am - 10:15am
Canal E

9:00am

The most valuable practice your team is avoiding. (Tim Ottinger)

Tim explains the one XP practice proven repeatedly to improve software practice significantly -- yet shunned by developers.

We will examine (and even experience!) the reasons why people are afraid to take the necessary step that just might revitalize their projects, their teams, and their careers -- and what to do about it.


Speakers
avatar for Tim Ottinger